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How did they do it?


#1

I just had a customer e-mail me about a pendant she saw someone
wearing on T.V. and I can’t for the life of me figure out how the
designer got this to lay properly. She has a small pin shaped like
a moon and she wanted it converted into a pendant…This is how she
described the one she saw… "It was a tiny chain that placed the
crescent moon pin in the little hole at the bottom of her adam’s
apple. It sat UP with the chain at the high end and longer on the
other side attaching at the bottom end. The pendant sat upright in
that little hole. " If I made the piece as described, it would be
laying on it’s back for sure! Do you think she pinned the clasp to
the back of her dress or something?

Wendy Newman


#2
It sat UP with the chain at the high end and longer on the other
side attaching at the bottom end. The pendant sat upright in that
little hole. [hollow] 

wendy - had she had it pinned to her neckline in the back every move
would relocate the pendant. she either had it surgically implanted
or adjusted it constantly off-camera. but it’s possible that in
fabricating the necklace one side of the chain had been measured to
precisely set in her neck hollow & when she centered the catch in
the back it pulled the bottom side of the chain taut until it sat
where she wanted it, which let the top chain droop just enough to
hold it upright - then had a friend staple it to the back of her
neck (that’s a joke people). any of the above requires more time
than my schedule allows so i’d have to super glue it - which reminds
me of a friend at school who asked me to glue one of her father’s
gold coins to her bare skin just under her collar bone to set off a
new strapless dress for a big social thingy to which we were ‘double
dating’. by evening’s end the coin had slipped so far down into her
considerable cleavage she was getting offers to forego finder’s fee
for salvage rights. it honestly happened people - ive


#3

Hi Wendy, How about if the chain is fused into a solid length - like
a chain-shaped wire - and then make the necklet like the ones you see
with wire and beads?

Best wishes,
Ian
Ian W. Wright
Sheffield, UK


#4
    "It was a tiny chain that placed the crescent moon pin in the
little hole at the bottom of her adam's apple. It sat UP with the
chain at the high end and longer on the other side attaching at the
bottom end. The pendant sat upright in that little hole." 

This is a tad confusing to follow. But if I’m picturing it right,
the chain comes around the neck to the top of the upright moon, then
continues around the neck leading from the bottom of the moon. Sort
of like this? (I hope the diagram that follows works)

C___

Maybe it wasn’t link chain. Maybe it was memory wire, or maybe even
fairly stiff omega-type chain? If it were somehow welded or soldered
solidly to the moon pendant in the appropriate places at the top and
bottom, that would hold the pendant upright, and would position it in
about the right spot to put the pendant in the hollow of the throat.
Actually, if that could be done, it sounds like it would look neat!

–Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Pet Motif Jewelry
http://www.featheredgems.com


#5

Wendy, I’m not at all sure that I fully understand the description,
but here’s a couple of things to think about:

  1. The crescent moon isn’t necessarily the same thickness
    everywhere. Could be thicker and heavier towards the bottom. Would
    that help?

  2. Being on TV it could just be that it had a lump of Blu-Tack or
    some other “mechanic” hidden behind it. Not joking either.

    Kevin (NW England, UK)


#6

I recently saw a pendant with a similar illusion. It was hung on one
chain, as you describe, but also on invisible fishing line in the
opposite direction. This kept it hanging properly, but the fishing
line was invisible unless you looked closely.

Karen Hemmerle
Boulder, CO