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Hold down clamps for a drill press


#1

I recently purchased a drill press, but I have no idea of what
to use as HOLD DOWN CLAMPS. I’ve checked every catalog I have,
and Have NOT seen anything that would “fit the bill.” Any
suggestions??? (all would be appreciated!!!)

Thanks for any advice (in advance!)


#2

to use as HOLD DOWN CLAMPS. I’ve checked every catalog I have,
and Have NOT seen anything that would “fit the bill.” Any
suggestions??? (all would be appreciated!!!)

Your local tool supplier or even hardware shop may have a
vice-grip product ( or it is v-g like) that has an upper jaw and
a ring-bolt in place of the lower - hold on, i’ll just look it
up in the catalogue -…right, here it is… it is a locking
hold down clamp, Vice-Grip model 11HD and Grainger list it in
their 1997 catalogue at 25.85 USD. Try them at www.grainger.com

  • they will most likely have a location near you, if you are in
    the United States.

Cheers
Douglas


#3

I recently purchased a drill press, but I have no idea of what
to use as HOLD DOWN CLAMPS. I’ve checked every catalog I have,
and Have NOT seen anything that would “fit the bill.” Any
suggestions??? (all would be appreciated!!!)

How big is it? If it is small enough to put on your bench, and
has any flat portions on its feet, drill holes in them (one per)
and bolt the frame to a piece of 3/4" plywood. Makes a
portable, yet very rigid platform. (Works great on my
mini-router table.) Use any kind of clamp to secure the plywood
base to your work bench.

        Tom LaRussa
        Tom's Gems -- rough and cut gemstones
        Web Site  --  http://www.digiweb.com/~mrlablee
        Email  --  @Tom_LaRussa

#4
 I recently purchased a drill press, but I have no idea of
what to use as HOLD DOWN CLAMPS. 

What size drill press & what size hold downs are you looking
for? Also wh at size parts do you want to hold down? There are
several ways to go to solv e this problem.

Dave


#5

Try MSC Industrial Supply 1-800-645-7270 or www.industry.net/mrop/msc

I personally prefer a cam action vise that is suitable for about
98% of my needs. An inexpensive import starts at $60.00. Other
styles are available that allow you to swivel and tilt. Also,
Harbor Freight may be a good source > >Steve D.


#6

Check woodworking catalogues or an woodworker supply store… if
all else fails I have give or take 100 burried in the basment…
Best wishes

cj
Gemstone Brockerage Associates Ltd. Telephone (518)438-5487
P.O. Box 8930 Albany, N.Y. 12208
Http://www.sweet-sites.com/gba cj-gba@worldnet.att.net
Agents for: Lukusuzi Gemstones Ltd. of Zambia
Lake Valley Minerals of Malawi
Truva Minning of Turkey
Fortune Gems and Jewelry Ltd. of Tanzania
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR EMAIL LIST OF FACET &CAB ROUGH AND FINISHED GEMSTONES


#7
Your local tool supplier or even hardware shop may have a
vice-grip product <SNIP> Vice-Grip model 11HD and Grainger list it in
their 1997 catalogue at 25.85 USD. 

These have been about long enough that in this area (Memphis,
TN) that the discout tool dealers at flea markets have them for
about $15. For folks outside the US, I have seen a Taiwanese
knock-off for about the same price. Unless all the knock-off
are coming to the US (doubtfull!) you should be able to get them
’most anywhere. They work great, and are quite versitile.

Marrin and Mary Delle Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell


#8

How big is it??? It’s small enough to use a drumel (sp?) tool.
It’s about 14 inches high, totally adjstable (height, depth,
width of bit, etc . . .) It does have flat feet and it has an
aluminum (or similar metal) base which is about 5"x 5" square.
The base has diagnal holes in it (look like

                              \   /
                               \ / 
                               o < is where the drill bit goes

through the base.)
/
/ \

there are some small holes at the end of the “X” (* four of
them- two on top, two on bottom kind of like where the *'s are) I
guess that is where these HOLD DOWN clamps are supposed to go.
(or so I assume . . .) I did see some mention about some sort of
vice, but I’m not sure whether that is what I should be using???

What I want to do is drill holes through more than one pre-cut
piece of silver. (ie: if I’m making an earring, I want to take
the right and left piece and drill a hole through both so I can
hang something from the hole. . . or if making a linked
bracelet, I want to drill through 4 or 5 of the pieces (to be
linked) so the holes are uniform. (Am I making sense??? : ) )


#9

I bought one from Sears to hold a hand drill several years ago.
It holds the drill firmly, has an adjustable base plate and
bolts to any surface. I’m positive they still make them.
Roland


#10

Check woodworking catalogues or an woodworker supply store… if
all else fails I have give or take 100 burried in the
basment… Best wishes

Hi CJ, Please send the 100 or so burried in your basement to:
12199 Apollo Drive, N. Royalton, Ohio 44133-3302 (G!!!)

I will check the woodworker supply stores, If I can find some-
I’m sure they are around, and while I’m at it, I’ll have to find
that “Museum wax” (can’t spell the R word . …) too!

Thanks!


#11

C- clamps, available any hardware of home improvement store;
(did you get table with press?) or you can use most any kind
of clamp like quick clamps. I’d go with c clamps,
inexpensive & versatile and my garage is full of 'em. Have
you had problems with just using your hand? Only used it on
wood so far, but Ken just holds it. K&K


#12

One way to hold multiple sheets of metal together for drilling
is with double sided scotch tape.

Depending on the size of the pieces 1 or 2 strips between each
sheet shou ld do the trick. Then if you need something to hang
onto you could scotch ta pe the whole assembly to a piece of
scrap metal. Be sure the metal is free o f dirt & oil before
applying the tape, clean it with alcohol.

If the holes are correspond to any of the sizes of a hole punch,
you’ll g et cleaner holes with a punch than a drill.

Dave


#13
One way to hold multiple sheets of metal together for drilling
is with double sided scotch tape.

Based on a recent soldering thread, I have wondered whether it
might be possible to use superglue to hold pieces together when
cutting multiple sheets for marriage-of-metals, and for drilling
precisely matching holes, such as this question addresses. For
me, if the pieces are clamped together, the clamps are in the
way. I have not used double sided tape, but have experienced
’creep’ with it in other applications. The parts could be
separated with either a soaking in acetone to desolve the
superglue, or heated to burn it away.

Has anyone tried this? What is the opinion of the group about
this?

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell


#14

Has anyone tried this? What is the opinion of the group about
this?

Well, I won’t speak for the group, but… I have used and still
use superglue all the time when working in my studio. It is
great for olding pieces to be sawn ( as per your query ),
drilled, filed and just about any thing where two or more pieces
eed to be treated in the same way. I also use it when making
bezels for small cabs - I simply glue the flat side of smaller
cabs to a piece of steel rod which is set into a block of wood -
this way I get a handle on the stone, and it will sit on my
bench without dissappearing. I filed the steel flat so that I
get good adhesion and away I go. The stone just pops off after I
have a very nicely fitting bezel - works great for oddly shaped
stones.

Cheers
Douglas


#15
  Based on a recent soldering thread, I have wondered whether
it might be possible to use superglue to hold pieces together
when cutting multiple sheets for marriage-of-metals, and for
drilling precisely matching holes,  

Yes, I have tried this and it works great. Just burn the super
glue off after drilling (use good ventilation)

Susan


#16
Well, I won't speak for the group, but... I have used and still
use superglue all the time when working in my studio. It is
great for olding pieces to be sawn ( as per your query ),
drilled, filed and just about any thing where two or more pieces
need to be treated in the same way. 
I also use it when making
bezels for small cabs - I simply glue the flat side of smaller
cabs to a piece of steel rod which is set into a block of wood -
this way I get a handle on the stone, and it will sit on my
bench without dissappearing. I filed the steel flat so that I
get good adhesion and away I go. The stone just pops off after I
have a very nicely fitting bezel - works great for oddly shaped
stones.

Thanks for the info!
A question here…Does this mean you are checking the bezel for
fit by inserting it into the bezel “upside down”? What do you
do about highly domed stones, or are you doing this (I guess you
must be!) before the bezel is attached to it’s backing. I’m a
’newbie’ at this, and just wanted to make sure.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell


#17

If your drill press has a table upon which you stand your work
and that table has slots in it, you can buy a vice that can be
bolted to the table. You can also get clamps that bolt through
the slots to hod work down. If you don’t have any slots in your
drill table. you are going to have problems holding youir work
down. Richard W UK


#18

Hi Marrin!

I know this conflicts with what others have written, but thought
you might like to hear a “dissenting” opinion.

I did try this with superglue. The superglue bond is pretty
brittle and for me did not hold up to the “abuse” of being
worked. If all you were doing is drilling a hole it might work,
but probably not much more. I considered epoxy, but getting the
pieces separated again might be a challenge, even with Attack.

I think I’m going to try to find some of that double-sided
carpeting tape someone mentioned earlier in the week.

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#19

Well, I tried the carpet tape some time back, and didn’t like
it! I had difficulty with the two pieces creeping out of
alignment, even though they were VERY well stuck together.
Based on your experience, I might try some of the more viscous,
gap filling superglue. It is supposedly a little more flexible.

Thanks for the feedback. I’ll let you know what I think after I
try it.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell


#20
 If your drill press has a table upon which you stand your
work and that table has slots in it, you can buy a vice that
can be bolted to the table. You can also get clamps that bolt
through the slots to hod work down. If you don't have any slots
in your drill table. you are going to have problems holding
youir work down. Richard W UK  >>

There are slots in the drill table. Please tell me more about
this vice. Thanks!