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Hoke Tip Sizes


#1

Recently, I purchased a used Hoke torch. Unfortunately, it came
with the wrong tips (Maco: N-1, N-2, N-3) which have female
threads. The torch also has female threads. In my efforts to buy
the appropriate tips, several questions have come up that the
supply companies have not been able to answer. The only sources
for Hoke products that I�ve found are (Romanoff and FDJ) which have
either not responded or was unable to help so I turn to the experts
(those of you that really use the equipment).

I intend to use the torch with both Natural & Propane / Oxygen to
do silver jewelry construction and light casting. The catalogs
list 3 standard tips for Natural gas and 4 for Propane. Each tip
has different stock numbers and different prices between the gases.
This leads me to believe that the two gases requires different
tips.

Questions: Is there a difference in these tips? Are different
orifice sizes needed for Natural/Propane gases or do the sizes
overlap?

I am also interested in purchasing the precision tip set (six
tips) for the Hoke torch but again the description suggest that
there might be some overlap with the standard tips.

Questions: If I get the precision set, is there any need to get
the standard tips or do they also overlap? Will the precision tips
work with both my gases?

Any help with this questions or other recommendations on setting
up a Hoke torch will be appreciated.

Mike
The Short Horn from the Long Horn State


#2

Questions: Is there a difference in these tips? Are different
orifice sizes needed for Natural/Propane gases or do the sizes
overlap?

Yes, there are differences in the tips. The natural gas tips have
a “flower bud” orifice, rather than a single hole orifice. I
personally use a Hoke torch (designed for natrual gas) with
propane. So I am actually using it with the “wrong” gas. I did
this so that I could switch to natural gas at a later time, and it
works. Actually, propane only burns 100*F hotter than natural gas.
I use the precision set with propane for 80% of my fabrication
work. The “flower bud” tips are ideal for casting and platinum
welding.

Questions: If I get the precision set, is there any need to get
the standard tips or do they also overlap? Will the precision tips
work with both my gases?

Yes, if you get the precision set, I recommend getting the
standard natural gas tips as well. Yes, the precision tips will
work with both gases, as will the standard natural gas tips.

I have the Vigor catalogue numbers for those three tips. They are
as follows:

BT-142 .037"
BT-143 .041"
BT-144 .047"

Please note, that the Vigor company has since been bought out by
Grobet File company and I 'm not sure which of the numbering
systems are now being employed. Grobet File company used the
H.R./GFC numbering system and Vigor used it’s own. If you contact
a local supplier that has a current catalogue, they can advise you
as to which numbering system is being used.

Some additional hints about the Hoke Torch…

I set my gas pressure at 6 psi, and the oxygen somewhere between
18 and 20 psi. I might suggest installing check valves somewhere in
your the torch system, as the Hoke torch does not have a built in
check valve arrangement.

Good luck, and let me know how it works out for you,

Eben Lenz


#3

Mike: I have used the Hoke setup for both natural gas and propane.
When I was at school we used the Hoke and natural gas, I then
purchased a torch for my own home studio. I use the same tips. I
really didn’t know that there were different ones for natural gas
and propane. I haven’t had any problems. As for the precision
tips(CHARLES YOU MAY BE INTERESTED IN THIS). When I was at school
our instructor Akira Ikegami showed us how to modify these tips for
more precise work. If you take a tip off of a mechanical pencil,
check to make sure that the tip is metal and not just chrome
painted plastic, you can then solder the pencil head to the #3 tip
using HARD SILVER SOLDER. By finding different pen and pencil
parts you can come up with a variety of different sizes of tips
that you can use. Even though to buy the set costs only about
$25.00. It is still kind of fun to make your own.Hope that helps.

Cary James Designs
P.O. Box 336
Manuels,Nfld.
A1W 1M9
(709) 834-4745


#4

Eben, thanks for sharing your advice and experience. You also
seemed to have anticipated some of my other questions. I should
have put my questions out to the Orchid group sooner, instead of
asking the jewelry and welding supply sources - which didn’t help
any. I can�t wait to get my order off.

You indicate your using 6 psi with your gas. Is that with propane
or have you now swithced natural gas? It seems like I�ve heard
somewhere that it is illegal to use regulators on natural gas.
That doesn�t make since to me, but is it true?

Thanks. Mike


#5

You indicate your using 6 psi with your gas. Is that with propane
or have you now switched to natural gas? It seems like I�ve heard
somewhere that it is illegal to use regulators on natural gas.
That doesn�t make since to me, but is it true?

Hi Mike,

Glad I could help. I currently use natural gas with my Hoke torch
at my day job. At home, I use propane with my Hoke. In both
cases, I’m using the precision adaptor set, as well as the three
previously mentioned tips. Fortunately, I have a cousin who works
for a utility company in upstate New Yrok. He has given me
considerable insight into natural gas as a fuel. Generally
speaking, natural gas is delivered to your building at somewhere
between 6 and 8 psi. This is why I set my propane pressure at 6
psi - therefore, the torch valve settings are relatively close.

My understanding about regulators on gas lines is #1) it varies
from state to state as to what local codes apply; #2) any domestic
type gas stove has a regulator installed on the gas line. It looks
something like the regulator found on propane barbeque grills; #3)
perhaps most importantly, there should be some type of “flash
arresting” device. The one device I have seen in Boston, consists
of a water column in which the supply is introduced under the
water. The natural gas bubbles up through the water to the exit
port that goes to the torches. This is essentially the same layout
as one would find in a water pipe from the “bad old 70s”. I hope
this clears up your current questions, please feel free to contact
me with any others.

Eben


#6
      When I was at school our instructor Akira Ikegami showed us
how to modify these tips for more precise work. If you take a tip
off of a mechanical pencil, check to make sure that the tip is
metal and not just chrome painted plastic, you can then solder
the pencil head to the #3 tip using HARD SILVER SOLDER.

We have done the same thing by soldering on tiny brass tubes,
usually with gold solder. Really is nice for tiny little jobs.

Mark P.
Wisconsin