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Historical Jewelry Manufacturing processes


#1

I’m looking for historical documents that would tell me what the
gold and enamel jewelry production of the early 1900s might entail.
What kind of chemicals were used? What was the manufacturing
process? I’m looking for American manufacturing processes -
specifically in the Northeast states.

Thanks!


#2

Jack,

You may wish to contact the Newark Museum in Newark, N.J. Newark was
a world leader in Jewelry production in the 1800’s and early 1900’s.
They have a large collection of Jewelry as well as a great archive.

If You Like Antique, Vintage or Custom Jewelry Visit us on the web
at: http://www.demarkjewelry.com

Greg DeMark
greg@demarkjewelry
www.demarkjewelry.com


#3

My name is Karen Martin Schwarz and I 'm new to the group.

I have a book, published by Dover titled “Metalwork & Enamelling” by
Herbert Maryon that shows the first edition as 1912. As it 's a
Dover book it may still be available.

Thompson Enamel has several books on the history of enameling.

http://www.thompsonenamel.com/products/publications/index.htm

From their catalog:

On Divers Arts Theophilus, paperback, 1979, 216 pages illustrated.
Translated from the Latin by John G. Hawthorne and Cyrill Stanley
Smith, Dover Publications, Inc., New York. “I have made it my concern
to hunt out this technique for your study as I learned it by looking
and listening.” On Divers Arts, c. 1122, is the oldest extant manual
on artistic crafts to be written by a practicing artist. Theophilus
teaches, with rigorous attention to fact but also with great
reverence, the making of pigments for fresco painting, the
manufacture of glue, the technique of gold leaf on parchment (the
first recorded European reference to true paper), how to blow glass
and design stained glass windows, fashion gold and silver chalices,
make a pipe organ and church bells. Precise instruction (earliest
known instruction) on enameling, chasing, repousse, niello, and
beaded wire work prove Theophilus’ first-hand knowledge of his
craft.

While I have never seen this book, it has been carried by Thompson
for as long as have been dealing with them, which is over 20 years.
They must feel it is worthwhile.

Karen


#4
I have a book, published by Dover titled "Metalwork & Enamelling"
by Herbert Maryon that shows the first edition as 1912. As it 's a
Dover book it may still be available. 

My copy of this is about 10 feet away from me as I write this - one
of the first really great jewelry books I ever got, about 30 years
ago. One of the little gems it holds is several pages of photos of
twisted wires - “twisted square, twisted again onto a large square
wire.”, etc, Not a large book, but a real gem.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#5

John,

This book is still available and has gone through several reprints.
You can order it from Amazon.com. The prices start out at $6.00 for a
new copy from one of their outside vendors or $9.97 from Amazon. A
used copy will set you back a whopping $1.92. I was intrigued by the
description so I have a new copy on it’s way. Thanks for the heads
up.

James S. Cantrell CMBJ


#6

OK, so this won’t tell you about “early 1900s American processes” as
you were looking for, but for anyone interested in how things were
done in an earlier time, I’d recommend “On Divers Arts”, which is
translated from a text written at about, if I remember correctly,
1100. It’s not exactly a page-turner, being from so long ago, but it
really is interesting to learn how things were done “way back when”.
It covers stained glass, too. There are very detailed descriptions,
as well as diagrams, showing the equipment, tools & processes.

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.designsbylisag.com


#7
OK, so this won't tell you about "early 1900s American processes"
as you were looking for, 

Hmm, if you are looking for turn of the 20th century
one book I can recommend is Henleys Formulas for Home and Workshop

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0517293072.htm

The original version was written in 1907 and included things like
adhesives, abrasives, soldiers, metal alloys and other things. It was
reprinted in the late 70’s. I often use it as a starting point for
trying to relate historical formulae to modern processes.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL
@Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org


#8
I'd recommend "On Divers Arts", which is translated from a text
written at about, if I remember correctly, 1100. 

yipee! another title to add to my collection…can you give me a bit
more bibliographical info…please! i looked on alibris but it didn’t
show up… thanks R


#9

On Divers Arts

by Theophilus, John G. Hawthorne (Translator), C. S. Smith
(Translator)

Paperback: 216 pages
Publisher: Dover Publications; New Ed edition (August 1, 1979)

can be ordered here:

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0486237842.htm

Mike O’Toole


#10

I’d recommend “On Divers Arts”, which is translated from a text

yipee! another title to add to my collection..can you give me a
bit more bibliographical info..please! i looked on alibris but it
didn't show up.. thanks R 

It’s pretty easy to find as a Dover reprint. (ISBN 0-486-23784-2). I
think the last copy I bought was cover priced in the 12 dollar (US)
range.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL
@Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org


#11

“On Divers Arts” is available from Dover Publications for $14.95 at
doverpublications.com. This is an excellent book. Dover also has
other books on historical jewelry including reprints of catalogs.

Dana, Loomis CA