Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Hematite


#1

i was wonder if anyone knew how to make Hematite (Hemalyke) beads. or
if anyone has some resources that i could use to learn how to make
them.

all i know is that the hematite is crushed and then mixed with a
binder. i don’t know what the binder is or the molding process. any
info would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jack


#2
    all i know is that the hematite is crushed and then mixed with
a binder. i don't know what the binder is or the molding process.
any info would be appreciated. 

Jack, that is not the way they are made. The stone is to an
approximate preform size and then run through a bead mill to grind to
shape. They are then mass tumbled to polish.

Crushing hematite results a red powder. Hematite is Iron Oxide,IE
rust. As a professional stone cutter, I refuse to work it for two
reasons. First, there is no value to the finished pieces, and second
the clean up after working it is a nightmare. Everything is covered
with a red stain that is almost impossible to remove. Buy the ready
made product.

Don


#3
all i know is that the hematite is crushed and then mixed with a
binder. i don't know what the binder is or the molding process. any
info would be appreciated. 

I don’t think so Jack. Hematite beads are made from the mineral in
exactly the same way that beads are made from quartz or ruby. I don’t
know what the process you’ve heard is but I don’t think you can sell
the resulting beads as hematite as they’d no longer have a crystalline
structure. Crushed hematite is red, not black (the name hematite
should tell us this if we have a little Latin and less Greek.)

Tony Konrath
Gold and Stone
www.goldandstone.com
tony@goldandstone.com


#4

You might try…lapidary arts…704-537-7099…roberta Or the darling
imports company…800-282-8436…konard carling ANDY


#5

Hi everyone, Actually, pace Tony’s comments, Jack is quite correct
about the nature of hematite. I quote from one of my suppliers:

"We have used a different spelling [from haematite] here to denote
the use of a re-formed and moulded version which now mainly replaces
solid haematite as a raw material for for jewellery manufacture."
Unfortunately I know nothing about the technical procedures used, but
at least Jack will know that there are such technical processes… Best
wishes Stevie


#6

In th UK the imitation is known as Hematine and is definitely molded

  • you can see the mould lines on the product often, but may be
    finished with normal lapidary techniques - considering the price I
    doubt it. It should definitely not be sold as Hematite.

I am completely with Don on the mess it makes but I do cut it since
it is local material for us and the reason for existence of many towns
around here.

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
@Andy_Parker
www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023


#7

I’m going to throw doubt on the “molded hematite” or “reconstituted
hematite.”

(Incidentally the UK spelling - from the Greek for blood - the red
streak that the material makes when drawn across a white unglazed
ceramic surface - is heamatite)

I’ve qualified as a gemologist so I know a fair bit and I’ve never
come across any reconstituted material. A good trawl through the web
gives me a few rumors - but I’ve not seen any reliable lab reports
that confirm the existence of the stuff. Even if a suppler says that
that’s how their beads or cameos are made I think they are mistaken
and that the they supplied is incorrect.

Any other gemologists out there who have further info? I’m quite
willing to be proved wrong!

Tony Konrath
Gold and Stone
www.goldandstone.com
tony@goldandstone.com


#8

Hello Tony, et al, I am aware of one supplier (Fire Mountain Gems)
that advertises a synthetic hematite they label “hemalyke.” How in
the heck it is synthesized remains a mystery. I’ve not seen it in
person, but the photos look just like hematite - price is about the
same, so your suggestion that it is really hematite makes sense.
They also have a magnetic “hemalyke” bead in their catalogue. Anyone
know about this stuff??

Judy in Kansas
Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
237 Seaton Hall
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-2936


#9
    I'm going to throw doubt on the "molded hematite" or
"reconstituted hematite." (Incidentally the UK spelling - from the
Greek for blood - the red streak that the material makes when drawn
across a white unglazed ceramic surface - is heamatite) 

No. The English spelling is haematite, which the the Concise Oxford
defines as: a ferric oxide ore forming dark red or reddish-black
masses. [Latin haematites from Greek haimatites (lithos) ‘bloodlike
(stone)’ (as haematin)] I have another supplier who uses the term
’hematine’ for reconstituted material; the point is to distinguish it
from the natural material.

    I've qualified as a gemologist so I know a fair bit and I've
never come across any reconstituted material. 

Actually, I buy from suppliers who are also qualified gemologists,
who say that what they are selling is reconstituted material.

   Even if a suppler says that that's how their beads or cameos are
made I think they are mistaken and that the they
supplied is incorrect. 

They are being honest, not ignorant. There is a difference.

Best wishes
Stevie