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Heavy textures in wax


#1

Hello all!

I have a custom ring on my plate right now that I’m getting really
into and having fun with (yeay!), it is a daily wear ring in silver
and so the customer agrees that a heavy shank with a texture is the
best way to go, it is going to get banged up may as well make it look
delibrate… only problem with a hammered texture is that she
already owns a few of my hammered rings and she doesn’t want them all
to look alike.

I think I’m out of textures I can easily do to the metal, so I’m
experimenting with textures in wax and trying out samples of
everything I can think of, are there any techniques that you
wonderful people can suggest? She wants the ring to be a door-knocker
so I have lots of room to play in.

Cheers!
Norah Kerr
www.besmithian.com


#2

Hi Norah,

What about taking an impression of a suitable tree branch with a
rough surface using the two part silicone putty that sets up cold.If
you found a branch the right size you just fill with molten wax and
cut out the centre

regards,
Tim Blades.


#3

How about using decorative punches (like leather punches or ones that
you make yourself) and just punch a design into the metal or if you
are working it in wax, do the designs in the wax with the punches.

JD


#4
I think I'm out of textures I can easily do to the metal, so I'm
experimenting with textures in wax and trying out samples of
everything I can think of, are there any techniques that you
wonderful people can suggest? 

Way - ell, this would be a great time to use Precious Metal Clay.
What it does is take texture.

Hmm. If you don’t want to try PMC, you could do a Castaldo Quick Sil
(RTV) mold of some interesting texture and then pour wax on it.

You could use some of the many texture plates that are on the market
for polymer clay and Precious Metal Clay. They come in plastic, brass
and silicone.

My own Silicone Texture Plates ™ could be used with wax. I’ve
never done it, but of course it would work. My STP “Erosion 1” would
make a cool ring. (apologies for being promotional, I don’t mean to
be, just answering the question and this is what I work with.)

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#5

Norah,

If you have a wax pen with a heat control you can turn the
temperature down and use the pen tip to create textures.

Greg DeMark
www.demarkjewelry.com


#6

I remember some wedding rings a friend made many years ago…she
took an iron rod the rod was about 1/4 inch thick and it was twisted
first in one direction and then in the other…in a moment of
inspiration, she heated the rod and rolled in onto pink sheet wax
and got a raised impression (texture) fron the negative places in
the rod. You could twist any type of metal and do the same thing. I
believe the tool was initially made from a square rod. The finer the
twists, the finer the “texture” I made texture on my wedding band by
diging the blade into the wax and twisting…I cut a curl out like
you get when you sharpen crayons. All the little chatter marks from
the not straight edge made interesting texture also. Heat a coarse
file and mark the wax. Have fun. MF


#7
I think I'm out of textures I can easily do to the metal, so I'm
experimenting with textures in wax and trying out samples of
everything I can think of, are there any techniques that you
wonderful people can suggest? 

One technique that’s given amazing results has been to pour hot,
liquid wax on the insides of peppers ( where you find ridges and
other textures) or onto curly lettuce leaves. When the wax
solidifies, carve the large piece into usable shapes and sizes for
your project.

Karen Strauss


#8

Textures in wax

I create several textures on wax models.

One method uses a pointed dental tool to produce a grainy sand cast
texture in the cast metal. The sand cast texture is produced by a
pointed dental tool. The tip of the tool is pressed against the wax.
The tool tip is rotated against the wax in small circles. The action
causes grooves to be cut in the wax. The motion is repeated until
the graining texture in the wax is produced.

One method uses a small spade shaped dental tool to produce a
texture that looks somewhat like the surface of a walnut. The tip of
the tool is drawn in parallel lines in the wax which cuts grooves in
the wax. The process is repeated until the desired texture is
produced.

Another technique is to spread sticky wax with a dental tool on the
surface of the wax model. This technique produces a surface similar
to that produced in oil paintings created with a pallet knife.

A heated tool can be drawn through the slightly melted wax on the
model.

Melt small pieces of wax on a artist pallet knife and then flick the
melted wax onto the model.

I have photos that shows the various textures and a paper describing
and showing the processes. I could send the paper upon request.

Lee Epperson


#9

One of my favorite textures for wax was the idea of a friend of
mine, not my own. Crumple foil up and flatten out; silicone mold from
that. It’s like reticulation, but not quite as smooth. It’s pretty
cool once it’s cast and you can shape the flat textured wax
(especially if you use aluwax) into just about anything. It’s
wonderful stuff.

V.


#10

If you are going to beat it up then beat it up. You can roll it on
rocks, brick, concert, you get the Idea. Don in Idaho where its been
cold too long


#11
It's pretty cool once it's cast and you can shape the flat
textured wax (especially if you use aluwax) into just about
anything. 

Why aluwax? I looked it up-- it’s a dental product, wax with
aluminum powder in it so that it will cool really slowly to allow
time to force into and around details. That would seem to mean it
wouldn’t burn out completely and/or would contaminate your casting.
What is the advantage in this kind of application?

Thanks!
Noel


#12

I create several textures on wax models. One method uses a pointed
dental tool to produce a grainy sand cast texture in the cast metal.
The sand cast texture is produced by a pointed dental tool. The tip
of the tool is pressed against the wax. The tool tip is rotated
against the wax in small circles. The action causes grooves to be
cut in the wax. The motion is repeated until the graining texture in
the wax is produced.

One method uses a small spade shaped dental tool to produce a
texture that looks somewhat like the surface of a walnut. The tip of
the tool is drawn in parallel lines in the wax which cuts grooves in
the wax. The process is repeated until the desired texture is
produced.

Another technique is to spread sticky wax with a dental tool on the
surface of the wax model. This technique produces a surface similar
to that produced in oil paintings created with a pallet knife. A
heated tool can be drawn through the slightly melted wax on the
model.

Melt small pieces of wax on a artist pallet knife and then flick the
melted wax onto the model.

I have photos that shows the various textures and a paper describing
and showing the processes. I could send the paper upon request.

Lee Epperson


#13

I was taught to use it by people that use it religiously for their
work. I don’t know if the aluminum has any effect on the castings. I
haven’t had any problem yet and I haven’t heard them tell of any
problems. I like it because, as you said, it cools at a slower rate.
I melt it into RTV molds with a soldering iron or wax pen. It allows
me to be sure to remove all bubbles in the mold.

But the thing I like best about it is that I can warm it with my
hands and work it repeatedly. It is very maleable (sp) for very
original designs. It is tricky to ensure it keeps its shape for
casting, but I think cooling the set sprue tree would solve that.

And it smells nice too.

If anyone has had any problems with the aluminum in casting, let me
know. I think it is used in dental casting, though I’m not sure what
is cast with it (gold?).

But the people who taught/teach me use it in their classes for their
students. So if it caused problems in casting, I would think it
would show up in failures of their students’ castings. I haven’t seen
it in the 3-plus years I have been with them.

But it’s an interesting thought to pursue.

V.


#14

Thanks for all the suggestions, I’m going to have some fun trying
some of them out.

As for the powdered aluminum I would think that it would burn rather
well it is only a little iron oxide short of being thermite. Or is
that idea a little hair raising?

grins

You guys rock, keep it up.

Norah :slight_smile: