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Heat shield products


#1

hi
99% of the time i use toilet paper that i wet w/ water. as
all juvenile delinquents know it clings really well to whatever
you throw it at. garnet sand that is wet works. i’ve tried
something called thermo clay available from borel& frei. it
really reminded me of delft clay used for sand casting. both are
kinda expensive. the thermo clay works for solder asembly as well
and is reusable. compared to toilet paper it seems cumbersome if
you just need a heat sink.


#2
On a related topic, has anyone used any of the heat shield
products (e.g., the one by Vigor that comes in a ReddiWhip like
can -- not as tasty though) while soldering?  What have you used
them for -- soldering with stones in place? protecting delicate
wire work while soldering? etc.  How effective are they?  Which
brands do you recommend.

i have been using heat shield for several years and find it is a
wonder. it protects even after it dries. i prefer the jar to the
areasol can it is cheaper and what doesn’t harden can be reused.
you do have to pack the piece well especially silver with
stones, but i get great results. i have also used it to protect
stones in heads adajacent to the one i am retipping. not for
everyone, but with practice and experience it can save you hours
of pulling and resetting not to mention broken prongs and tips
from same.


#3

Best heat sheild I have used is wet toilet paper. As long as it
remains wet, the stones are safe. A bit crude, but works fine.

Bill Raby


#4
Best heat sheild I have used is wet toilet paper. As long as it
remains wet, the stones are safe. A bit crude, but works fine.

Thanks to recommendations of the group I tried toilet paper and
wet sand in a teacup. Both worked really well and save $$$ on
the heat shield. Do love that wet toilet paper, brings back
childhood memories :wink:


#5

In most circumstances, I use a small beaker of water to shield heat from
stones…If I am just sizing or soldering a ring at the shank, I can usually
get by with using a large, sharp flame and hold the ring in my fingers (on
gold only as it is a poor conductor of heat). Then after soldering, I immerse
the ring in the water.
Ken