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Hardening silver pin backs after soldering?


#1

Does anyone have a method for hardening silver pin backs after
soldering?

CS


#2

As far as I’m aware, the traditional method is to work harden it by
twisting.

I’ve found it best to make the pin about 10mm longer than required
and bend the unwanted end at right angles to make a long “L” shape.
You then hold the “good” end securely and, with the short “L” in
pliers, twist the pin one or two complete turns. Test its springiness
by “pinging” it and twist more if required. You can then cut the
unwanted bit off and file the work hardened pin to shape.

There is a nice little benefit from the twisting because it leaves a
rather attractive shallow barley sugar look to the pin, which also
makes it slightly more resistant to sliding out should the clasp
come undone. Of course, if you don’t like the barley twist look you
can always file it smooth - its very shallow.

Regards, Gary Wooding


#3

Hi

Does anyone have a method for hardening silver pin backs after
soldering? 

I twist them.

Chris
http:// www.rockwaterstudio.com


#4
Does anyone have a method for hardening silver pin backs after
soldering? 

You can try work-hardening by lightly hammering the pin on both
sides (might flatten it slightly).

Better: avoid annealing the pin in the first place by riveting it in
place after all soldering operations have been completed. (Complete
polishing your piece before riveting the pin in place so you don’t
have it in the way.)

HTH
Dick Davies
Sometime metal bender


#5

I was taught to twist the wire until it’s hard but before it’s too
brittle. Blue tape around the post, just keep your wrist straight
when you do it, using one pliers to hold the base of the post in one
place tightly (or you’ll risk twisting it off), the other at the top
(over the top really). Then twist with the top wrench.

Kim Paluch
http://of-the-earth.org


#6
You then hold the "good" end securely and, with the short "L" in
pliers, twist the pin one or two complete turns. 

That sounds like a good idea. I cut posts to the size I want, solder
them onto the back and then twist them using needle nose pliers about
2-3mm from the ends of the posts. I twist by holding the pliers
tightly for a couple of twists, then less tightly so that the posts
slips through pliers’ jaws, thus creating the groove that the
"butterfly" back sits in. However, doing it my way would mean that
the wire past my groove is not being hardened and could, I suppose,
eventually snap off - so I’ll try your method Gary.

Helen
UK
http://www.hillsgems.co.uk


#7

Better yet, use either nickle silver or stainless steel for your pin
backs. In most cases, silver is not going to be hard enough to stand
up to the stresses on a pin (poking through a heavier fabric,
supporting a mid-size or heavier brooch, spanning a large gap,
etc.). That’s pretty standard practice and does not impact the
hallmarking of the piece.

Karen Goeller
No Limitations Designs
Hand-made, one-of-a-kind jewelry