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Harbor Freight Mini Cut-off Saw


#1

To whoever said that this saw is a good idea for cutting tubing,
thank you! I had been eyeing that at the store, and I took that as
the final nudge to get it. I do the enameled beads on copper tubes,
and I dreaded it every time I needed to cut more tube pieces. I have
a plumber’s pipe cutter, which cuts the 1/8" tubing I use, but there
was always a last little sliver all around in the middle that it
didn’t cut, and to have to do that after going through the effort of
cutting the piece off seems a bit much work. I also have a sort of a
tubing vise thing, which I clamped the tube into, then clamped that
into my bench vise (although it’s not really meant to be clamped into
a vise) and then used my saw to cut the pieces. That worked OK, but
again, it was time consuming, and a bit fiddly. This saw is so quick!
In no time I have enough pieces cut to make lots of beads.

BUT! The big but. It’s not quite perfect. On every piece there is a
little flare at one end where it seems the bit of metal under the
blade pushed out of the way at the very end of the cut instead of
getting cut off. I have to get that little snippet with a file, but
it’s still quicker overall than my other methods. Any thoughts on how
to get that last little bit to actually CUT off? Do I need to turn
the tubing a bit at the end or something? Or go slower? Or faster?
Actually, I think I tried going slower, but it didn’t work. I didn’t
try the faster idea or the turning the tubing idea yet, though.

Such a cute little thing, I’m sure I’ll have lots of other uses for
it, too.

Thanks!

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.lisagallagher.com


#2

Back in the days when my friend would my tubing on the band saw, the
edges were very rough. I got a bottle of Nitric acid and I used a 1:5
mix with water to eat the the edges smooth. Do this outside and not
under any greenery that you value. The fumes are BAD and I noticed
that tree leaves would brown and die after I did tubes under them.
I’m sure that it’s bad for the enviroment, but, I can’t ever see that
it would add a lot to the already existing pollutants. The acid also
cleans the tubing so it will take the enamel well. You might be able
to tumble the tubing with a good cut down medium. I intend to get one
of those saws, myself, very soon. It may be summer before I can do
much. In May and June we have 6 shows in 8 weeks. I’m going to be
busy just keeping up, I hope. Cairenn, the Howling Artist
www.howlingartist.com

One is only as small as one’s heart


#3

Hi Lisa,

your tube needs support, if you make a hole in a brass block that
the tube just fits through, and then set it up so that the saw cuts
through that hole at right angles but the block is still in one
piece, you feed the tube through as much as you need at a time and
you will get much better ends.

you would need a different block for each size, or a set of holes
for different sized tubes. Keep the slot near the edge where the cut
piece will come out and you can see how much you are cutting off.

A diagram would be much clearer! but I don’t know how to do that.

regards Tim Blades.


#4

Lisa, Please I have been looking in the Internet for the mini cut off
saw but was not able to find it in the harbor freight internet
catalog, is it possible to know the part nomber so we can take a look
on it.

Regards,
Thor Hedderich


#5

Hi Thor,

was not able to find it in the harbor freight internet catalog, is
it possible to know the part nomber so we can take a look on it. 

The item # on the one I have is: 42307.

It’s not the greatest in the world, but with a little care it can be
used for number of jobs that by hand would be a PITA.

Dave


#6

Catalog no: 42307 COMPACT CUT-OFF SAW
Direct link: http://tinyurl.com/346lsh

Rick Copeland
rockymountainwonders.com


#7

http://www.harborfreight.com Item number 42307

It might help to replace the standard vise that comes with it with a
v-channel and a clamp from above. Maybe cut a piece of aluminum and
let the saw cut into the block as it cuts thru so you have a backing
when it cuts thru the tube.

Does anyone know of a place to get a finer tooth balde for one of
these?

Jon


#8

Jon

Does anyone know of a place to get a finer tooth blade for one of
these? 

I would try Enco or one of the other tooling houses. I have bought
several blades such as this, although for other holders, as I
recall, they had both jewelry and regular slotting saw blades.

Terry


#9

Jon

Does anyone know of a place to get a finer tooth balde for one of
these? 

I was wrong, just checked, the blades I bought from Enco will not
work. The original blade is 2" and the ones from Enco are 1.75".
Even if you made an adapter to fit the larger hole size for the
arbor, the blade is to small to get a complete cut unless you also
raise the floor of the vise by at least 1/8 inch and I did not check
for a 45 deg. Cut, which if I remember right, was marginal.

Sorry, I thought the slitting saw blades would work.

Terry


#10
It might help to replace the standard vise that comes with it with
a v-channel and a clamp from above. 

A simpler solution is just to rotate the tubing as you cut.

Noel


#11

Terry, I saw some in the local Freight Harbor store here in Austin.
Also, they are available in their online catalogue for $9.99 for a
set of 3. Interestingly–most of their blades are indexed under
"sawblades’ one word.

Cheers,
Carol / Austin, TX


#12

Oops-- I didn’t read that well enough. You are looking for finer
toothed blades.

There is a source of diamond “cut-off” blades – which is J. Walter,
Inc.

Not sure if this will work or not. They are a wholesaler.

This small-diameter cut-off wheel is excellent for cutting steel and
stainless steel. They are available in 2", 3" or 4" diameter and
from 1/32" to 1/2" thickness. (50, 75 or 100mm diameter, 1mm - 12mm
thickness. In addition, Zip™ wheels boast an excellent wheel life
and cool cutting temperature.

http://www.globalspec.com/featuredproducts/detail?exhibitId=39890


#13

Noel,

A simpler solution is just to rotate the tubing as you cut. 

Thanks. That was an idea I’d had later, but hadn’t yet tried out. I
think that’s what I will try the next time I get a chance to get some
work done, though. I’ll let y’all know how it goes!

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.lisagallagher.com


#14

Hi,

Tooth count on blades used for this type of saw are related to blade
thickness. Generally the higher the tooth count, the thinner the
blade. Many times, blade thickness will effect blade life. Thinner
blades are more fragile.

The blade that came on the saw I have has aprox 100 teeth (if I
counted right) & is .035" thick.

If you go to an industrial supplier & ask for ‘Jeweler’s Slotting
Saws’ you may be able to find the blade you’re looking for. MSC
(mscdirect.com) has about 15 blades of various thickness with from
190 to 110 teeth. The item # for a blade.008" thick with 190 teeth
is 03293586.

Dave


#15

Lisa, if you were the person who was looking for finer blades, I
found a company that makes 2" blades. I e-mailed the rep and he
called.

If you or whomever wanted the blades can get me their zip code, he
will find a supplier for you.

Cheers!
Carol / TX


#16
I am looking for are about the size of a pencil lead. 

Here is another source:

Canemco & Marivac
Products for Electron Microscopy and Histology

#283-178
Micro-Diamond File (Round) 0.250mm ( 0.010")

#283-179
Micro-Diamond File (Round) 0.5mm (0.020")

#283-180
Micro-Diamond File (Triangular) 0.5mm (0.020")

Should be small enough
Mark