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Hammers


#1

Greetings!

I want to add to my collection of forming hammers. What
companies offer wide selections of forming hammers? Rio Grande
catalog doesn’t have what I’m looking for.

Cheers

Virginia Lyons
Metalsmith


#2

Virginia, try Schor International. I found them on the web
and do not know anything about them, but they have a good range
of hammers.

http://shorinternational.com/HammerSilversmith.htm

Brian Clarke,
Silversmithing Workshops,
@ybc
http://homepage.tinet.ie/~ybc


#3

Frei & Borel have a great selection. Jack da Silva has great
anvils too! Check out my website. I included a SNAG/ Metalsmith
magazine section and list all the current advertisers there will
be others listed direct link to ad page is

Happy hunting!


#4

I want to add to my collection of forming hammers. What
companies offer wide selections of forming hammers? Rio Grande
catalog doesn’t have what I’m looking for.

Virginia Lyons Got a list from Betty Helen Longhi last year at a
workshop: Anchor Tool and Supply has gone out of business. Try
the following: E.B. Fitler, RD 2 Box 176-B, Milton DE 19968,
Phone-800-346-2497. Never ordered from them, so cannot give a
recommendation. Another company: Casting Specialties Corp., PO Box
32, Cedarburg, Wisconsin 53012—414-375-2430 Allcraft Tool and
Supply, but I don’t have their address. Louise in San Diego
@lgillin1


#5

Frei and Borel in San Francisco, Allcraft in New York,
Metaliferous (they have old ones too sometimes), Anchor tool in
New Jersey, ARE in Vermont, also ttry the blacksmith suppliers
like Centaur Forge (some hammers are cheaper from them anyway),
and body bumping suppliers like Eastham. Then there are the
German companies like Schmalz and Fischer in Pforzheim. Addresses
anyone? Charles

Charles Lewton-Brain
Box 1624, Ste M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7, Canada


#6

I bought a wonderful set of hammers and forming stakes from
Alpha Supply in Bremerton, Washington. They have a good line of
smithing tools, and lapidary supply.
–Barbara Bequette


#7

Hi Virginia, I had a nice chasing hammer made, by Bill Fiorini.
He has a site on ArtMetal. You could contact him to see if he
still makes hammers. I had this one made several years ago, and
still have a listing of what he made, at that time, but have not
contacted him for an update. He’s worth a try. Curtis


#8

Hello, can you tell me what is best way to hammer wire like 20
gauge, if you want some little pieces to hang out of beads or
jewelry. Do you use a specific type of hammer on an anvil, and
thats it, or is their more…? Lyn


#9

Louise, Mr Fitler is in my neck of the woods and is a very
helpful person. He is also very reasonably priced. As far as
catalogs --he’s sends a catalog and then a price sheet–I like to
see the price listed with the item. So that would be my only
drawback. Delivery is great. Good Luck! Lisa Pilchard


#10

Allcraft sells a large variety of forging hammers and stakes - I
don’t have their phone number in front of me so I’ll pass it
along later. Tom Kruskal


#11

You can also try Centaur Forge in ( I believe ) San Francisco
they have an extensive selection of hammers for the blacksmithing
trade as well as many other sizes styles and weights Ron


#12

Greetings, I am often amazed at the wonder attributed to hammers.
Although I do admit that hammers are most wonderful things. A
person could make their own hammers w/ a little effort and the
tools already possesed by a beginning metalworker. Cyrus Niccore


#13

Allcraft Tool and Supply Co. 666 Pacific Street Brooklyn, NY
(1-800-645-7124) or718-789-7923 . They sell over 40 different
kinds of hammers, and all kinds of stakes and anvils.My catalog
is 5 years old, but I imagine they’re still in business.
(Although these days, it’s hard to tell) Give it a try.


#14
 "best" way to hammer 20 gauge wire

Hi, Lyn, If you want to have the hammered dimples to reflect
light, I would hammer a reasonable length of wire that would
allow you to hold on to one end of it. I would use the round end
of a small chasing hammer after I had flattened it a bit with the
flat end of the hammer, or, I would use a small ball peen
(spelling) hammer the same way. The ball peen hammer can be
purchased for a couple of dollars about anywhere. After
hammering, I would cut the small lengths required with wire
cutters or a jewelers saw. If they need holes in one end to
secure them to your project, I suppose I would use the flex shaft
with a small diameter drill bit in it. After filing the ends,
and polishing they would be ready to use. --Barbara


#15

Hi Virginia, A good way to get hammers to your specifications is
to make a wooden pattern and have a local casting shop cast them
for you.

Richard Whitehouse


#16

I may be off the subject of hammers a little but I need a little
help. Im no silversmith but I make sculpted collars using a plain
rawhide hammer and steel neck mandrell. By doing this the collar
takes on a great tailored shape as that of a human torso (the
neck area) Is there a better hammer for this? and is threre a
stake that I could use to make this same shape instead of the
neck mandrell? Any help will be appreaciated.


#17

Try Harbor Freight (tool company). Their hammers are primarily
for the construction trade but what wonderful buys on hammers of
all kinds (from ball ping to star faced shrinking hammer).


#18

Hello Preston, It sounds to me as if you are doing everything
right. I make the occasional neckpiece and I think I do it about
the same way. You could try a plastic faced hammer to save a
little time. Have fun. Tom Arnold


#19

Lyn - I hammer wire with the slightly curved end of a planishing
hammer and a flat anvil. Be careful not to let the edge of the
hammer or anvil dig into the metal. If you keep your hammer and
anvil clean and shiney (zam rounge works well) then you need
almost no finishing on the wire.

Tom Kruskal


#20

Can anyone tell me where is best place to store Butane cartridge
refills for small torches…is it safe in the house?..I know
it is very flammable…this is my first time using torch…and I
was very nervous looking at the package, because of all the
labeling about the hazardous contents…Lynn