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Green gold alloy?


#1

Hello all,

I have a client who is looking for a green gold (that they
supposedly saw in the past) that is the color of “first press olive
oil”. I do most of my own alloying for various colored metals, but
have not come up with this tone of green gold.

Typically I alloy fine silver and fine gold for my green golds, but
I am thinking that their memory is less than accurate, or that the
surface was an enamel, or perhaps some alloy that I have not seen
before.

Any suggestions are welcome. Feel free to contact me directly.

Thanks!
Jim
James Dailing


#2

Good luck, Jim. Trying to match a client’s memory–especially when
described so specifically and with a culinary twist–can be a rabbit
hole. Better to show them what you CAN make and walk 'em if they
don’t like it.

Hope all is well down south.
A


#3

Black Hills Gold has been leaves. I’m assuming it has to do with more
copper In The alloy. See of you can research what they do to get
green


#4

Oh yeah. That’s pretty much the alloy that I would use: .999 silver
and 24k. Dull, yellowish green. Very soft…


#5
Trying to match a client's memory--especially when described so
specifically and with a culinary twist--can be a rabbit hole.
Better to show them what you CAN make and walk 'em if they don't
like it. 

I know Andy.

I’ve alloyed 14 and 18kt green gold and neither alloy quite match
what they are looking for.

I might try a small amount of 20kt green and see what I come up
with. that or include a small bottle of first pressed olive oil
along with the ring to dip from time to time.

Thanks
Jim
James Dailing


#6

Hi Jim,

Just a thought: in my reading about the brain and perception, one of
the things that came up was that people remember colors wrong.

The brain always remembers colors as more saturated than they really
were. So your guy may “remember” olive-oil green, but it may well
not have been that color, really. If that’s the case, you’re never
going to match what he remembers, because he’s wrong.

Get it as green as you can, (w/silver) and then call a line at that
point.

FWIW,
Brian


#7

Color, I think, is always subjective…


#8

There are some really green colored alloys they have 2-10% cadmimum
in them along with the silver and gold and sometimes a trace of
copper to darken the green.

But as cadmimum is very toxic and carcinogenic I would decline to
make it.

Jim

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#9

found a mix on the Brepohl Book with 1-2% zinc, mostly silver and a
trace of copper to darken the green, there are some real old recipes
I would haveto dig up my college notes for, I think the brepohl book
comes close, with its alloys the other is Diego Pinton book. the old
recipees call for some zinc with the combination of silver and
copper to make the different greens, although I am sure the cadmium
alloy probably has a very nice colorbut for its carcinogenic hues I
would pass. Hratch


#10

In the back of my mind I remember when I worked in a trade shop that
alloyedits gold, they where making green gold and the secret was
manganese. I alsoremember they said if it was not added correctly it
would not work and burnaway or not mix This was 35 years ago so I do
not know what percent and at that time my job was rolling and drawing
the metal, I did not do the alloying.

I would love to know if manganese was used or if they were pulling
my leg as I was the noise little girl in the shop and they would
tease me all the time when I asked question.

Lauren


#11

Nice to have a little copper. Maybe that would help to harden the
alloy…


#12

Manganese is used in some experimental white gold alloys to replace
the use of nickel but never heard of it being used in green gold.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#13
Nice to have a little copper. Maybe that would help to harden the
alloy... 

Wouldn’t that make the green gold look more yellow?

Paf Dvorak


#14

I use gold, and silver to make my green gold unless I want a slightly
different color of gold then I play with adding different alloys to
achieve those different colors. always keeping mind that Men see
colors different then Women. Scientifically proven fact. As a man I
have to compensate for this problem. Women just do not see colors the
same as men!..

Panama Bay Jewelers


#15
I use gold, and silver to make my green gold unless I want a
slightly different color of gold then I play with adding different
alloys to achieve those different colors. always keeping mind that
Men see colors different then Women. Scientifically proven fact. As
a man I have to compensate for this problem. Women just do not see
colors the same as men!..... 

I have an old gold alloy book (1940s?) at home that mentions green
gold alloys - not sure how green. I’ll have a dig if I remember
tonight.