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Good Supplies Non-Wholesale?


#1

Is there a good source for jewelry supplies that don’t require you to
have a wholesale liscence? Catalogs, websites, etc… Other than Rio
Grande there has to be other sources out their for tools, silver
sheet and wire, etc…

If the best way is wholesale (here comes the dumb question), how does
one acquire a wholesale liscence or whatever is needed to purchase
wholesale?

Thanks,
Tee


#2

Hello:

My suggestion is that you call the membership department at
Manufacturing Jewelers and Suppliers of America. They run a free
referral service and can search the database of MJSA members for what
you need.

The same service is also available online at http://mjsa.polygon.net,
but it sounds like your type of search is going to require a human
being. Just call Joann Stojek at 800-444-6572, ext. 3024 for a
little help.

Take care,
John Harvey
MJSA Communications Manager


#3

Try Indian Jewelers Supply 1 800 545 6540 LOL no hassel
buying from them and the prices are pretty good along with good range
of f tools findings and materials Leon K St louis


#4

Here are a couple of places you can try: TSI, Seattle WA
1-800-426-9984 email: TSIaid@aol.com Swest, Dallas, TX 1-800-527-5057
There are others, but I had the catalogs of these two handy! Hope
this helps. Laney

Laney Clark Kinetic Jewelry Designs


#5

Tee, As far as I know, there is no such thing as a wholesale license.
I have had my own business for 27 years and have never been asked for
a wholesale license when opening an account with a supplier. I have
found that one of the best for everything, metals, findings, stones,
tools, packaging & display is Stuller in Lafayette, LA. If I order
before 5 pm I have it the next day via FedEx. They have extensive
catalogs, helpful and knowledgeable employees, and efficient service.

Phone 800-877-7777.
Joel, Nyack, NY
www.schwalbstudio.com


#6
If the best way is wholesale (here comes the dumb question), how does
one acquire a wholesale liscence or whatever is needed to purchase
wholesale?

There is no such thing as a wholesale license as far as I know. The
only thing that might resemble such a thing is a resale tax number.
This allows one to buy without paying a sales tax, but somewhere along
the line a use tax or the collection and payment of a sales tax are
going to be in order. Check with your state authorities. If you wish
to buy “wholesale”, you need to buy in bulk. That is what the market
requires. Not arbitrary rules by a state governing authority. Maybe
you will need such a license in China. Personally, I regularly refuse
to buy from anyone that “requires” a sales tax ID.


#7
how does one acquire a wholesale liscence or whatever is needed to
purchase wholesale?  

Depends on what state you live in, but what suppliers are looking for
to sell “wholesale” is a resale certificate - an indication that you
are registered to sell goods to the public and to collect and remit
the sales tax thereon. Contact your state sales tax office and ask
how you get a vendor’s license or whatever they call it in your
state. Include your vendor’s license # (or resale # or whatever) in
your correspondence with your suppliers - and tell them that your
purchases are intended for resale - that means ( at least in Ohio )
that they don’t have to charge sales tax on the material to you and
you do to your customers - unless the have a vendor’s license/
reseller’s certificate too. (If you’re in a "Value-added Tax’"
location, it’s a whole 'nuther ballgame.)

Some suppliers (the more ethical ones?) will require further proof of
your bona fides before selling to you at wholesale, such as a photo
of your storefront or copies of invoices from other suppliers. This
is to prevent John Q. Public from cutting you out of the equation and
buying direct from your suppliers. Its hard enough for a poor jeweler
to make a decent living without meeting your best customer at your
wholesaler’s counter saying, “I’m just buying a nice two-carat
diamond and a beautiful ring to mount it in and I’ll stop by your
studio and let you set it and size it for me.” Aaarrrgh! Best of Luck

Mike


#8

I just did this. In Utah, first you need to register as a business in
the state. Also, get a fed. id number. After that, you can apply to the
state for a tax number. This gives you a certificate to buy things for
your business with out paying tax. This would also be used for
wholesale purposes.

miki


#9

Wholesale license? As far as I know, there ain’t no such animal.
However, some suppliers may request a “resale number” (for
businesses) so they don’t charge you sales tax. If you are not in
business and you have no resale number you can still get your
supplies, but you pay sales tax (where applicable) on your
purchases, and you will probably have to pay retail prices.


#10
    If the best way is wholesale (here comes the dumb question),
how does one acquire a wholesale liscence or whatever is needed to
purchase wholesale?  

You need a resale license from your state dept.of taxation.Then
you’ll have a number that shows you’re in business when you buy from
wholesale vendors.The money you save buying wholesale you get to give
to the state when you sell something, because you have to pay sales
tax. It’s the wonderful world of jewelry! Have fun, Ed


#11

If you are in the USA, contact your local TAX department (I looked in
the phone book) and the license is not to buy wholesale, but to sell
as such. If you are selling your goods directly to the public you
need to have a VENDOR License (this is what allows you to buy
wholesale, in most cases.) If you sell in various counties, you may
want to get the TRANSIENT VENDOR’S license. In Ohio, we have
different tax rates in various counties, and the TRANSIENT license
allows me to sell in any of them. The license cost me $100.00 (or
was it $80.00??? sorry, don’t remember) and is renewed for $40.00
per year.


#12

Tee didn’t say what state. If it’s NY, you only need to call the NY
Sales Tax authority and they will issue you a resale number. You
don’t register with the state (unless you’re a corporation, of
course.) If you want a DBA (Doing Business As) name to open a bank
account or something, you’ll need to register with your county clerk
and pay a small fee. It’s certainly not necessary to get a Federal
Tax ID, unless you have employees which you will be withholding income
tax and social security for. Actually, I sort of doubt that it’s
necessary in Utah, but I could be wrong.

OK, now we have info on two states. Only 48 to go .

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#13

And, don’t forget, buying at wholesale prices for resale purposes is
only for materials used in your products that you (or another gallery)
will sell at a later time with sales tax attached. Meaning… you
(should) only not pay sales tax for metals, findings, and gems.
Finishing supplies are debatable. Tools don’t count.

Hope this helps!
Lori


#14

North Carolina issues Retail Sales Tax numbers and Wholesale Tax
numbers. The bank just uses your SS number for the DBA account.
Every county has a person or office to see about getting the application.


#15

And, don’t forget, buying at wholesale prices for resale purposes is
only for materials used in your products that you (or another gallery)
will sell at a later time with sales tax attached. Meaning… you
(should) only not pay sales tax for metals, findings, and gems.
Finishing supplies are debatable. Tools don’t count.

Ahh… this is not necessarily true. The state issuing the
certificate will have publications regarding what is taxable and what
is not. In NY, for example, the list of exempt sales includes:

“Machinery or equipment and related parts, tools and supplies used in
the production of tangible personal property … for sale.”

Another hint - read the publications. Do not rely on verbal
from state employees. Ask your accountant if in doubt.
Some state employees earn points by generating additional revenue
from taxpayers and will lie to do it. If you pay sales tax where you
don’t need to, you can probably get it back, but it won’t be easy.

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#16
Machinery or equipment and related parts, tools and supplies used
in the production of tangible personal property .... for sale.  

I hate to say, but I understand this as being machinery or equipment
which you manufacture or purchase and plan to RESELL . . .that’s why
it’s FOR SALE. Not machinery that you buy to use to produce a
wholesale product which you then sell. So the machinery would not be
exempt from “sales” taxes. They don’t really specify if it is the
machinery or the personal property which is “for sale.” Gee, I have
never thought of jewelry as personal property, but I guess it is.
(Gee, I may be way off base on this one . . . being the skeptic
that I am.)

I do think that you can avoid sales taxes if you purchase from
catalog suppliers who do not do business in YOUR state.


#17
   I hate to say, but I understand this as being machinery or
equipment which you manufacture or purchase and plan to RESELL  . .
.that's why it's FOR SALE.  Not machinery that you buy to use to
produce a wholesale product which you then sell.  So the machinery
would not be exempt from "sales" taxes.  They don't really specify
if it is the machinery or the personal property which is "for sale."
 Gee, I have never thought of jewelry as personal property, but I
guess it is. <G> (Gee, I may be way off base on this one . . . being
the skeptic that I am.) 

I have to agree with your last statement . Read it carefully.
“tools and supplies used in the production of tangible personal
property…” This is in the listing of exempted items. Perhaps the
fact that I left out part was confusing. To fill it in - “…
production of tangible personal property, gas, electricity,
refrigeration or steam for sale.” Jewelry is certainly “tangible
personal property.”

   I do think that you can avoid sales taxes if you purchase from
catalog suppliers who do not do business in YOUR state. 

Not legally, in most states. You are obligated to be a good citizen
and voluntarily send in the appropriate amount of tax on any
purchases on which sales tax was not collected by the vendor. The
revenue office of your state will be happy to supply the proper forms
. The difference is that a vendor who does not have a business
presence in your state is not required to collect the tax. You are
still supposed to pay it.

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#18

I finally have to speak up. You have to take into account your
audience here; every state looks at purchases of tools, etc.
differently. Here in Wisconsin, we have a sales & USE tax. This law
means that if you order a tool or supply from out of state and pay no
sales tax on the purchase, that you must report said purchase on the
Sales & Use Tax remittance form and pay the sales tax on the purchase
to Wisconsin(5%). A lot of people ignore this, but wait for the audit
and that’s the first thing they check. Basically, if you use it,
consume it, hold as a sample, or take out of inventory for personal
use, you’ve got to pay up the tax. --That said, I am not a CPA and am
not offering advice, only my interpretation of the law as I see it;
ask your CPA for advice.


#19

Ahh… this is not necessarily true. The state issuing the
certificate will have publications regarding what is taxable and what
is not.

I thought this was more of a federal issue and what the IRS
regulates. Anyway, it’s always up to the individual as to how much
personal risk they are willing to assume when purchasing items and
indicating if they are for resale. I personally like to play it safe
and talk to my accountant.

Lori Bugaj


#20
The state issuing the certificate will have publications
regarding what is taxable and what  is not. I thought this was
more of a federal issue and what the IRS regulates. 

Not so - the Feds are NOT involved in sales taxes (yet) - sales and
use taxes are strictly states’ concerns and each of our fair fifty
has its own convoluted set of rules and regs designed to keep lawyers
and accountants busy and happy as clams - ain’t government wonderful?

Mike