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Gold Sizing


#1

Today I was visiting with a friend who showed me a woven silver
brooch she’d made. To enhance it further, she put the gold sizing Rio
sells on some of the areas and applied gold leaf on top of it.
However…24 hours later the gold was still tacky (damp) in spots. I
asked her why she did this technique instead of Keum-Bo and she said
it was so much easier—no heat to deal with, no flying pieces of
gold, etc.

I looked in the Rio catalog and am wondering if this product is
actually to be used on metal. Most sizing I’ve seen in the past was
for wood.

Wondering if anybody has experience with this product, if it’s to be
used on metal…and if it holds up.

Also, thanks to everyone who responded to my tumbler query. I’ve got
3 machines going right now and am experimenting.

Liane Redpath-Worlund


#2
Wondering if anybody has experience with this product, if it's to
be used on metal...and if it holds up. 

It may be that it needs to be drier before the gold is applied.
Normally, it’s applied with the sizing just barely still tacky, if
even that, rather than wet.

And yes, people use it. Check out the work of David Huang. If you’re
not familiar with his stuff, you’ll enjoy seeing what he does.
Wonderful holloware objects, often lined or decorated with gold leaf.
I’ve asked him why he doesn’t electroplate, and he says he prefers
the look of gold leaf. Quite different, perhaps richer in appearance,
but also just a different surface, and works well for him. Plus,
unlike Kum Bo, it works on metals or materials other than silver.
Much of Davids work is copper, and the gold leaf is very rich
looking indeed on those objects. On David’s work, of course, these
are decorative objects, not jewelry to be worn. I’d expect it to be
less resistant to abrasion or wear and tear than Kum Bo or
electroplating, since the bond is essentially glue, not metalurgical.
But used properly on carefully chosen surfaces, it should be quite
servicable within those limitations. You’d probably not want to put
a gold leafed item into an ultrasonic very long or to steam clean the
heck out of it either.

Peter Rowe


#3
I looked in the Rio catalog and am wondering if this product is
actually to be used on metal. Most sizing I've seen in the past
was for wood. 

Yes, it really is intended for use on metal, it does take forever to
dry, though I don’t remember exactly how long. I’m with you, I’d
encourage your friend to learn Keum-boo. If she buys the book by
Celie Fago, gets the tools she says to get, it will be easy. An agate
burnisher is essential.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#4

It may be that it needs to be drier before the gold is applied.
Normally, it’s applied with the sizing just barely still tacky

Thanks for your input. Both she & I have seen Keum-Boo done and have
tried it on our own. But it seems the artists/teachers who we’ve
watched are so familiar with the process they ‘fly by the seat of
their pants’ in knowing exactly when the metal is hot enough. I’ve
tried this process and just watched my gold disappear as did my
friend. This is what made the sizing so appealing. I will look for
the Celie Fago book as well.

Liane Redpath-Worlund


#5
it seems the artists/teachers who we've watched are so familiar
with the process they 'fly by the seat of their pants' in knowing
exactly when the metal is hot enough. I've tried this process and
just watched my gold disappear 

Fellow-Orchidean Elaine Luther showed me (and others) a great
method, if you want to try again. When the tip of a toothpick
touched to the silver surface scorches, it is hot enough. At that
point, you can usually remove the piece from the hot plate, or turn
the hot plate off, so it won’t continue to get hotter. Unless the
silver piece is extremely dainty, it should stay hot enough long
enough to get your gold burnished on.

And, by the way, though it is great to have an agate or hematite
burnisher, I have not found it to be essential. You just need to
switch burnishers every so often, or dip your (steel) burnisher in
water and dry it, because if it gets too hot, the gold will stick to
it.

Noel


#6
But it seems the artists/teachers who we've watched are so familiar
with the process they 'fly by the seat of their pants' in knowing
exactly when the metal is hot enough. I've tried this process and
just watched my gold disappear as did my friend. 

Good God! What happened to your friend?
(pulling self together now)

But seriously, Celie covers the temperature thing in her book. Keum
boo is so easy when you’ve got the right tools.

There’s also a video out now, I haven’t seen it, but Rio sells it.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#7

There are two excellent DVDs available on the process of Keum-Boo by
Christine Dhein, Assistant Director of the Revere Academy.

Keum-Boo Basics - The Art of Bonding Gold to Silver
Volume 1 Dangle Earrings

Keum-Boo: Beyond the Basics - Bonding Gold to a Soldered Form
Volume 2 Hollow Pendant

You can order online at www.christinedhein.com or call 415.407.5389.

Michael David Sturlin
www.goldcrochet.com
www.michaeldavidsturlin.com


#8

http://www.pmcconnection.com/pdf/KUMBOO.pdf
Here’s a two page document on the basics of doing Keum-boo.

Elaine