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Gold coin?


#1

Hello, I am new to this group, and to working with gold. I am
interested in making gold coins to commerate life events with my
family (e.g. daughter being born). I envision a simple design for
the coin, about the size of a half dollar with name and/or event and
date engraved on the face. I was surprised how much I would be
charged to have this done for me, and am interested in doing the work
myself.

Can someone please point me to a resource to help a beginner? Is
this task beyond a beginner?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Jim


#2

Hi James

The quote you received were most likely for making a stamping die
from steel, which yes, is a lot of work and thus relatively
expensive. It’s a little silly to make a die for one coin, however, a
cast coin would work in this case, and the only expense other than
the gold (and casting charges) would be having someone engrave in wax
or make a photoetching in photopolymer. Another idea, If you wanted
to use silver instead of gold, you could acid etch.

I can engrave a wax for you, or several other member of this group,
accurately and inexpensively, using CAD and a desktop CNC milling
machine.

I don’t do photopolymer work anymore, but there may be member here
who still does that. A photopolymer photoetching can be cast almost
as easily as wax.

If you are interesting in pursuing this further, or simply
discussing it, drop me a note at @Jeffrey_Everett3.

By the way, I make commerative coin dies for gold and silver
stamping.

Jeffrey Everett


#3

Jim,

Best advice I can give you is to get a copy of “The Treatises of
Benvenuto Cellini on Goldsmithing and Sculpture.” There you will
find in Chapter XIV - "How to Make Steel Dies For Stamping Coins."
Old stuff but still applies today … plus there’s all the
historical romance in doing it like it was done in the past.

If you have any questions afterwards I’ll be happy to answer them on
the forum or off.

With modern day steels, and using flexshaft rotary tools, hammer and
chisel, hand push gravers, perhaps a few die sinkers files – you
should be able to do as well as the old master in a very short time.

Your most expensive tool would be the flexshaft – at around $200,
the rest might cost you a little over a hundred dollars. Depends on
what kind of a shopper you are. I found a great Foredom (H model -
the biggest one made) flexshaft at the flea market for $40 a couple
months back.

You will wear out long before good tools will…

I also highly recommend the Autobiography of Benvento Cellini. I
just reread both books for about the 4th or 5th time in 35 years
last month.

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts School
2207 Lucile Ave.
Stockton, CA 95209
209-477-0550 Workshop/Studio/Classrooms