Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Glues and Class advice


#1

I am co teaching a local workshop in viking weaving. The other
teacher is the glass person. The idea is that she would make pendants
with them and I would take two afternoons to teach the weaving and
then teach them to wire them up so they can hang them on their own
chains. She thought that she could tack fuse the two layers so that
there would be a groove to hold the wire. She made three samples for
me and the idea worked fine. However, things did not go well with
the student glass. Layers slid and edges fused. She is now off on a
trip and I have the problem. I have students doing some grinding
along corners but don’t think that fifteen people and two Dremels
will get the groove to suit me. Much as it pains me, I think I will
need to resort to glue as well. I know about E 6000 but think that it
would show. I don’t trust super glues and I never manage to mix epoxy
so it hardens. Are there other glues that anyone could recommend?

marilyn


#2
I don't trust super glues and I never manage to mix epoxy so it
hardens. Are there other glues that anyone could recommend? 

Here is the epoxy secret: use two toothpicks.

Don’t use the epoxy that comes in a syringe. Use the two separate
tubes. Squeeze out equal amounts on a piece of index card. Mix with
the first toothpick, discard. Apply with the 2nd toothpick.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#3

Marilyn,

ZAP is a good glue to use. I just purchased some amazing industrial
marine quality glue from a local home show. I’ll let you know how it
works. It will instantly glue metal to glass to rubber, etc. It won’t
bond your fingers together and comes off with acetone. It also has a
shelf life of 5 years. I have been trying to solve a pesky problem
with a short silver peg and biwa pearl for a production piece. Hope
it works.

-k

Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
50 Guinan St.
Waltham, MA 02451
Ph. 781/891-3854 Fax 3857
http://www.metalwerx.com/
Jewelry/Metalarts School & Cooperative Studio


#4

Hi All,

Most of the mixing of epoxie for jewelry work is done in small
amounts. I recycle the screw-on tops from those soda and water
bottles for this job. They are a perfect little cup to mix in. I also
use the 2 toothpick or wooden matchstick method of mixing.

Another great item from around the house to recycle are the plastic
dishes from frozen dinners. I have found lots for uses for these and
it beats tossing them in the landfill.

Rick (In the clouds today on top of Little Mtn.)
Beads, Bones& Stones
earthworks inc(+)rivendell-farm.com


#5
I don't trust super glues and I never manage to mix epoxy so it
hardens. Are there other glues that anyone could recommend? 

Now that my Internet and e-mail has stabilized after hurricane
Wilma, it is my great pleasure to again ask for and offer advice to
one of my main passions - Orchid.

Please don’t give up on epoxy. First, never mix the two parts on
paper or other porous surfaces, such as cardboard. The resin and
hardener will absorb into it differently due to their slightly
different viscosity and may not harden properly. A small plastic
baggie, coffee can lid, etc., will do fine. The same goes for what
you use to stir them together. Chopsticks, toothpics, rolled-up
paper, etc., will also act similarly to a porous surface. I use a
metal paper clip, folded double at one end to stir, and the other end
to apply. This is the best way I’ve found to keep the resin and
hardener equal.

It’s great to be back,

James S. Duncan, G.G.
James in SoFL


#6

Also, I think epoxy has a definite shelf life. I buy the smallest
possible quantity, and when I have problems with it not hardening, I
usually find that it’s too old.

Janet Kofoed


#7
   It's great to be back, 

Hey…welcome back James. It HAS been along time but always have
the welcome mat out for a fellow Orchadian.

Cheers, Don.


#8
Chopsticks, toothpics, rolled-up paper, etc., will also act
similarly to a porous surface. I use a metal paper clip, folded
double at one end to stir, and the other end to apply. This is the
best way I've found to keep the resin and hardener equal. 

just as an aside - I use a couple of those broken drill bits that
seem to breed on my bench for mixing glue -might as well get another
use out of them…

Christine in Sth Aust


#9

I mix epoxy on a 4 x 4 inch smooth tile with an artist pallet knife.
I bought the tile at Home Depot.

I find it best to mix the epoxy for a short time then wipe the epoxy
off the pallet knife then continue mixing. I have a feeling that the
residue on the knife does not mix as well as the epoxy on the tile.

The tile can be wiped clean with painters thinner.

I always mix more than I need and set the surplus aside for future
evaluation of the cure. If the surplus does not harden the epoxy on
the project will not harden.

The clear epoxies harden but seem to remain sticky for a short time.
For inlaying large stones I use Devcon aluminum filled epoxy paste
not the liquid. That stuff hardens like a rock.


#10

I’m not exactly sure what the work you are describing looks like and
functions. Could we get a picture?

I do a few different applications for gluing glass to metal and
fabric. This is only to secure the work, so the piece doesn’t wiggle
out of place etc.

I use superglue for the fabric coated elastic, two part epoxy (solid)
and there is a one part epoxy (slightly flexible) which works fine,
though it takes 24hrs to cure.

I have these at the studio, the brand is LePage, I believe.

good luck
Aimee Kennedy
www.fineandgood.com


#11

To glue glass to metal, there is a great adhesive made for use with
watch crystals. It drys absolutely invisible, with the excess
totally dissapearing around the edges. It dries very quickly by
placing it in ultraviolet waves like direct sunlight, blacklights, or
tanning bed lights, in a matter of a minute or two. If it will hold a
mineral glass crystal in a watch securely, then jewelry applications
should be a piece of cake for it. I use it daily for years now, but I
cant remember the name of it. If anyone is interested in it, I will
look the name up. When I buy it, I empty the small tube into a small
plastic container so that I can dip and apply with a tiny screwdriver
tip. It never drys up till its exposed to strong ultraviolet waves,
so it lasts forever. By the way, it will not work between any other
combination of materials than glass and metal, or glass and glass. It
has to do with refractive index of the materials.I have tried to glue
2 plastic watch crystals together, like a sandwich, and it never
dried, even under intense ultraviolet waves.

Ed in Kokomo


#12

Marilyn:

I don't trust super glues and I never manage to mix epoxy so it
hardens. Are there other glues that anyone could recommend? 

I strongly recommend Tri Olyse. It is a clear, non-yellowing UV glue
that cures with an activator instead of UV light. Very easy to use.
One drop of glue per square inch on one surface, lightly paint the
activator on the other side. Let them dry for a moment then
assemble. Make sure you get your pieces positioned right quickly
because it bonds almost instantly - the only way for it to come off
is for glass to come with it. Cures to workability in 15 minutes. It
is optically clear and rated to 3,000 psi. A little pricy - around
$22.00 but goes a very long way. Very commonly used for glass to
glass fusing and jewelry findings to glass. We use it to glue
sterling findings to fused glass. Have never had one come apart in
two years of use. You must follow the directions, though. I’ve known
people to have bad results if they don’t wait for it to flash off or
use too much. We buy it from our local glass shop. If you Google it
there will be multiple hits. Hope this isn’t too late for your
students - just going through my archives.

Good luck.
Larry


#13

Hi Ed,

To glue glass to metal, there is a great adhesive made for use with
watch crystals. It drys absolutely invisible, with the excess
totally dissapearing around the edges.

I would like to know the name of this adhesive.

Thanks,
Margaret


#14

Larry

This glass to glass glue have you tried it silver to silver?
Looking for something to use on sterling

Thanks
A long time lurker


#15

Thanks for all the references. I don’t have time to get any of the
glues and yes, there were some interesting one recommended. If I were
doing more of this, I would try some of them. Since this is community
ed type class and I didn’t have anything to do with the making of the
class, I am just going to take some of the glues that I have and
explain to the students that there are other and better choices if
they want to hunt them down.

marilyn


#16
I would like to know the name of this adhesive. 

Most watch material supply places have it. Casker, in Cinncinati is
where I buy it from. They simply call it Clear UV Adhesive. Their
part number is #120.126, priced at $5.95 for.7 oz with a needle
applicator.

Ed in Kokomo


#17
I would like to know the name of this adhesive. 

The one I use is “Loctite Clear Glass Adhesive.” I get from
watchmakers supply houses. C. R. Time and Cas-Ker both carry it.

Del


#18

Tim:

I’ve never tried silver to silver. Is there a reason you can’t
solder? If you would like to send me your e-mail address I’ll give it
a shot and get back to you.

Larry