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Gemstones set on shell cameos


#1

Hi, I have a problem. I have taught myself to carve cameos and now I
find I have one I wish to augment with melee as a necklace and and
earring. What is the appropriate way to set a faceted gemstone to a
shell cameo?

Most I have seen have been tourist grade with glued on stones. Since
even the hypo cement I have used in the past has limited time
constraints. I have seen after 5-7 years it will fail at times. What
is the best way to ensure the diamonds I use stay put for
generations?

Also a friend took pictures at Torro del Grecco and they are using a
curved metal block set on the bench top edge to support the dop stick
when carving is this type bench attachment something I can buy? I
use my foredom to get the blanks ready to carve but then use hand
engravers.

Thanks in advance.
Teri


#2

Hi Teri,

I have a problem. I have taught myself to carve cameos and now I
find I have one I wish to augment with melee as a necklace and and
earring. What is the appropriate way to set a faceted gemstone to a
shell cameo? 

Firstly… pictures, I love cameos, and will be making some custom
cameos, but machines will help me, as I will be using models I
create in a CAD package. I’ll carve a few by hand to get a feel for
the material first, but as I said I love cameos, and would like to
see your work. I opened up one of my reference books (it was about
Gladiators), and there was a cameo with a male as the subject… it
was perfectly carved.

Now to your problem, glues can work, but a discrete bezel or claw
setting, could be used for effect an security. If you don’t plan on
setting the gem yourself, go and speak to a setter and ask for their
advice (they prefer you to ask for their advice as early as
possible).

Regards Charles A.


#3

Teri- I’ve had to fix these before. In the old days they used to
drill a small hole in the cameo at the point where the center of the
necklace was as well as two points where the “chain” for the
necklace ends. The “chain” was usually a twisted wire soldered to the
pendant, usually a small diamond shaped white gold plate with a small
diamond bead set into it. A fine silver tube is soldered to the back
of the pendant and that is burnished on the back side of the pendant.
Like a bead set stone in a small plate in the middle of an onyx ring.
The two wires are inserted at their holes and bent over. No glue
necessary.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#4
A fine silver tube is soldered to the back of the pendant and that
is burnished on the back side of the pendant. Like a bead set stone
in a small plate in the middle of an onyx ring. The two wires are
inserted at their holes and bent over. No glue necessary.

Just wondering how you’d do this without burning the cameo?

I suppose you could use that piece of fine silver tube you
mentioned, and use a punch to expand the tube into the hole you
drilled, then bezel set the diamond?

I’d prefer to not use glue, for something I’m doing this year, but
as one of the components would be damaged by any application of heat,
I think I’ll have to :frowning:

Regards Charles A.


#5

Charles- The diamond is first set into a small plate. It can then
have a tube soldered on the back as well as the wires for the chain
part. Then the cameo is drilled and the chain wires and tube are
inserted into the holes drilled. The wires are bent, and the tube is
burnished on the back. No glue. We kinda frown on the use of glue in
stone setting around our shop.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#6

I would never set a stone with glue, although I’d make an exception
for pearl.

I have some heat sensitive wood that I’m going to use in a special
pendant, I could make a nice bezel, and I prefer harder cold
connections, but it would ruin the concept of the piece, so I have
to use a “little” glue. I will have to use a “little” glue on the
back of an opal, due to the concept.

I was going to use animal glue, but that can come apart if water
gets on it.

I set my first stone last year, and it was a very satisfying
exercise :slight_smile:

I’m really enjoying making jewellery these days, stressful, but
rewarding.

Regards Charles A.