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FYI conversion chart for Gauge - Inch - Millimeter


#1

Conversion Chart for
Gauge - Inch - Millimeter (rounded to second decimal)

29           		.013"       		0.33 mm
28          		.014"       		0.36 mm
27      			.016"       		0.40 mm
26      			.018"       		0.46 mm
25      			.020"       		0.51 mm
24      			.022"       		0.56 mm
23      			.025"       		0.64 mm
22      			.028"       		0.71 mm
21     			.030"     		0.76 mm
21           		.032"      		0.81 mm
20          		.0355"     		0.90 mm
19           		.042"      		1.07 mm
18          		.050"       		1.27 mm
17      			.058"       		1.47 mm
16          		.065"       		1.65 mm
15          		.072"       		1.83 mm
14          		.083"       		2.11 mm
13          		.095"       		2.41 mm
12    			.100"      		2.54 mm
12          		.109"       		2.77 mm
11	          	.120"       		3.05 mm
10      			.134"       		3.40 mm

Compliments of: Rough and Ready Gems, Inc. P.O. Box 621813
Littleton, Colorado 80162-1813 tel: 303.933.7670 fax: 303.933.7056
www.briolettes.com Your source for Fine Gemstone
BRIOLETTES And Precision Ultrasonic Drilling


#2

Check out Ganoksin’s online conversion utilities at:

enjoy
hanuman


#3
    Check out Ganoksin's online conversion utilities at:
http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc 

REALLY HANDY volume calculator - links to other converters, too. Goes
hand in hand with this link. If/when you need it, it’s so cool:

http://grapevine.abe.msstate.edu/~fto/tools/vol/index.html

#4

Conversion Chart for
Gauge - Inch - Millimeter (rounded to second decimal)

29 .013" 0.33 mm
28 .014" 0.36 mm
27 .016" 0.40 mm
26 .018" 0.46 mm
25 .020" 0.51 mm
24 .022" 0.56 mm
23 .025" 0.64 mm
22 .028" 0.71 mm
21 .030" 0.76 mm
21 .032" 0.81 mm
20 .0355" 0.90 mm
19 .042" 1.07 mm
18 .050" 1.27 mm
17 .058" 1.47 mm
16 .065" 1.65 mm
15 .072" 1.83 mm
14 .083" 2.11 mm
13 .095" 2.41 mm
12 .100" 2.54 mm
12 .109" 2.77 mm
11 .120" 3.05 mm
10 .134" 3.40 mm

This chart does not check out with others— Hoover and Strong,
McCreight, Rio Grande. The US uses the Brown and Sharp system and I
Believe most everyone else uses metric measurements. A few sizes
conflicted with memory… then they don’t seem to really check out …
This chart seems to be for the Birmingham iron wire measuring
system. There are at least 8 wire gage systems and several systems
for sheet metal that are all a bit different. Even the old
Machinery’s handbook 1966 edition recognized the problem and
recommended using decimal measurements when specifying material. The
old stuff hangs on in some industries with a resulting need to
always check things out when just a gage number is specified. jesse


#5
"This chart does not check out with others " 

Dear Jesse & Fellow Orchidistas, My Conversion Chart used the
Birmingham Gage aka Stub’s Iron Wire Gage.

I based my chart on Small Parts Company’s catalogue from whom I buy
my drill tube which I use to make ultrasonic drill bits for drilling
gems.

I copied their small diameter stainless tubing chart -gauge to
inch conversion- as the initial basis for my chart. I then added
the metric portion based on a 25.4 mm to the inch conversion.

From what I understand in your post there are more than one type of
gauge measurement.

I used to measure and label all my ultrasonically drilled hole
diameters using inches. (i.e…e. 0.018", 0.020", 0.025" etc.) but
many jewelers complained and wanted a gauge measurement. Now It
seems I have been basing my conversions on the wrong gauge system.
What is the gauge system American jewelers use? What about the rest
of the world, do you use gauge, metric, or… ?

I will make a new chart adding that gauge system. Please post a few
comparative conversions (gauge to inch) from your info so I/we can
see what the difference is.

Live and Learn.

Thanks, Steve Green - Rough and Ready Gems - Briolettes and
Ultrasonic Drilling www.briolettes.com


#6

Go to a library and look at a copy of “Machinery’s Handbook”. look
under wire and sheetmetal gages – gives some explanations

On the web see: http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/wiregage.html No
explanations

http://www.sizes.com/materls/wire.htm some explanations

and shows 17 (!!!) wire gage systems— not a bad place to look.

http://www.efunda.com/designstandards/gages/wire_forward.cfm

And then there are sheet metal gages!!!

You are doing the right thing with decimals. In the US the Brown
and Sharpe system is the one to use but there are exceptions in some
industries with some materials.

Jesse


#7
In the US  the  Brown and Sharpe system is the one to use but there
are exceptions in some industries with some materials. Jess 

I think you are right, I have always been under the impression that
one was for non ferrous (sp?) metals and the other was for ferrous.

So if you buy 30Gge binding wire (for instance) it may
not be the same size as 30Gge gold or silver wire.


#8

This posting makes it obviously clear that everyone should only use
inches or millimeters, doesn’t it? Sandra