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Fuel tank storage


#1

Hi Folks, I’m finally taking some “down time” to rearrange the studio
a bit to optimize efficiency and work flow. Of course, every action
has an equal and opposite reaction, so now I need to revamp my
ventilation system, do some rewiring, figure out where everything
else will fit, etc.

It seems the most perfect place now for my oxygen and acetylene
tanks is on their side, in the caddy. Pretty stable and very
unlikely to be disturbed. Is there any problem or issue with storing
and using these tanks on their sides?

Thanks in advance!
Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#2
    It seems the most perfect place now for my oxygen and
acetylene tanks is on their side, in the caddy.  Pretty stable and
very unlikely to be disturbed. Is there any problem or issue with
storing and using these tanks on their sides? 

Hi Dave, An acetylene tank should only be used when it is in the
upright position. Acetylene is dissolved in acetone and stored as a
liquid in the tank.

Timothy A. Hansen
TAH Handcrafted Jewelry
web-site: www.tah-handcrafted-jewelry.com
e-mail: @Timothy_A_Hansen1


#3

Hi Dave; I don’t think you’ll want to store the acetylene tank on
it’s side. Call the place that fills them for you and ask, but
here’s a story I was told. It wouldn’t surprise me if somebody in the
know told me that it’s all balogny, but here goes.

There is crushed corn-cob in the tank, and there is always a little
liquid acetone left in the tank when you run out all the gas. That’s
why you don’t want to run them completely empty. From what I hear,
you’ll start squirting flaming liquid out of your torch if you do.
It would figure, if this were true, that it would be sooner that your
torch would become a flame-thrower if the tank were on it’s side.

Can somebody either confirm or deny this take on it?

David L. Huffman


#4

More than using, you should NEVER store an acetylene tank on it’s
side. They have an expanded Ceramic honeycomb material that is used
to dissolved the Acetylene into, and setting it on it side can cause
damage to the matrix inside as well as cause liquid acet. to enter
your hoses. While HP oxygen can be stored on it’s side, it’s best to
always use it in a vertical position.

And finally, the tanks will take up less floor space if they are
standing

Anyways, hope that helps
-Doug
(hi, I’m new here…glass blower/jewelry student)


#5
    It seems the most perfect place now for my oxygen and
acetylene tanks is on their side, in the caddy.  Pretty stable and
very unlikely to be disturbed. Is there any problem or issue with
storing and using these tanks on their sides? 

G’day Dave. The Oxygen will probably be OK on it’s side, but I
think it would be wiser to keep the acetylene tank upright. There
should not be any liquid acetylene rolling about as although it is
dissolved in acetone, the solution is is absorbed in something like
pumice. But I don’t like the idea; I have been in dozens of places
where acetylene gas is used, but have never seen it other than stored
upright. But why not get the opinion of the gas supplier?

Personally I use propane (from a short squat tank and you’d have to
work at it to knock it over) - which is hot enough with oxygen to
melt platinum using a decent torch. But I have my oxygen cylinder
chained upright to the wall with a good stout chain, and I have the
spanner chained to it. – Cheers for now,

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#6

Acetylene tanks should not be used on their sides because they
contain some acetone in the tank. Using the tank on it’s side
increases the chance of drawing acetone into the line and regulators.

Jack Reisland


#7

Dave – acetylene tanks should never be placed on their side! I don’t
remember the details, has something to do with something settling
out, but it is a definite no-no!

Margaret


#8

Yes, there is a problem of laying acetylene cylinders on the side.
Acetlyene tanks are filled with acetone and the gas is pumped in and
disolved in the liquid. The gas then vaporizes off the top of
liquid. If you lay the tank down, it is possible to get some of the
liquid to get into your regulator, hoselines and torch fouling them
up. I sold these gases for 37 years so take my word for it. It is OK
for the oxygen to lay down.


#9

What is really happening here is that the acetylene is dissolved in
acetone which, in turn, is in the holes in a porous medium of one
sort or another. Kinda like the fizz in a Coke with crushed
ice…When the pressure is lessened, by opening the valve, the
acetylene evaporates and goes into the regulators an on to the
torch. All well and good until one of us doofus jewelers lays the
tank on its side! Then when we open the valve the pressure forces
the liquid acetone throught the regulator/ torch system! If you
light it, it makes an unholy smoky mess. Obviously, I’ve done it.
Tom Hollis


#10

Dave, I have always been told that this is a no-no…tanks must be
store in an up-right position. Kelly


#11

My father and brothers (being welders their whole lives) have warned
me on countless occasions NEVER PUT THE TANKS LAYING DOWN!!! and
NEVER PUT OIL ON THE TANKS KNOBS/HANDLES!!! you risk explosion. Lee