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French term "recoupe" in English


#1

Hello all,

I’m searching for the English equivalent of a French term. The term
is “recoupe.” It relates to a grain setting, when the jeweller cuts
around the grains to make a brighter edge.

I have a book about settings in English, translated from French,
which calls it “cut-up” (in inverted commas) but I’m not convinced.

Would anyone know what this technique of “recoupe” is called in
English?

Many thanks!
Sandra


#2
I'm searching for the English equivalent of a French term. The
term is "recoupe." It relates to a grain setting, when the jeweller
cuts around the grains to make a brighter edge. 

Sounds like “bead & bright”.

Noel


#3
Would anyone know what this technique of "recoupe" is called in
English? 

Recoupe is a sub-group of Cut settings. Others been pave, thread,
and etc. “Cut Up” is a wrong translation. “Cut Down” is a proper
term. Cut Down is used with individual stones. When group of stones
is involved, the term “Covered” is used.

Covered settings are used when soft transition required between
areas which set with and areas which are not. An example
can be like an incrustation, or a border of pave. A lot of times it
is used, when design element have a very specific contour, but
goldsmith lacking gemstones to fit the contour, so covered setting
is used in these cases.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#4

“recouper” means “to cut again”. You have here a touch-up
operation by cutting, a “cut-up”. Nice and creative translation, I
would say.


#5

The Anglo Saxons were doing grain setting long before there were
French people :wink:

A name wasn’t mentioned for the technique, at the time of the
conversation, but I could ask for more if you like?

Regards Charles


#6
"recouper" means "to cut again". You have here a _touch-up_
operation by cutting, a "cut-up". Nice and creative translation, I
would say. 

While ‘recouper’ (verb) can be translated as simply ‘to re-cut’, it
is perhaps instructive to look at the root verb ‘couper’ for the
underlying meaning-set (spectrum of meanings).

The root verb ‘couper’ has several meanings that include ‘to cut
down’, ‘cut off’, ‘chop’, ‘slice’, ‘spoil’, ‘dilute’ (e.g. wine), and
even ‘slice’.

Also, while this looks to be a verbal-use one would have to examine
the original use in French to know for sure. It could also be a
clever or idiomatic use of a noun/verb mix (e.g. ‘A re-cut’).

The root noun would be: une coupe - a cutting, cut-out, cut, haircut,
cup (e.g. La Coupe du Monde ‘The World Cup’), bowl, glass, section

While I don’t know what the term is in French idiomatic terms of
jewelry, I would bet it is some one or more of these.

For me the word ‘recoupe’ does leave one with the idea of a
’touch-up’ through the method of cutting, since one would not need to
’re-cut’ without an initial ‘cut’.

Just my $.02.

Cheers!
Christopher


#7

Hi All

I think my “serti grain recoupe” is a “thread and grain setting.”

Best wishes
Sandra


#8

Hi christopher

Impressive work… And smart analysis.

When I Was working in the US, I used to describe that precise
operation of doing a bright cut on the side of a grain set as doing
a “fillet” (to be pronounced “fealett”) as in french it is called so
(well at least in Belgium)… My Americans friends seemed to
understand that term pretty well…

Have fun.
Ced


#9
When I Was working in the US, I used to describe that precise
operation of doing a bright cut on the side of a grain set as
doing a "fillet 

Sorry for been picky, but there are no grains in recoupe technique.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#10
Sorry for been picky, but there are no grains in recoupe
technique.

Well, yes you’re being picky… My dear Leonid!

Ha ha, I can picture people’s faces behind their screen thinking:
Another one who bites the dust from Leonid’s intervention…

I'm searching for the English equivalent of a French term. The
term is "recoupe." It relates to a grain setting, when the jeweller
cuts around the grains to make a brighter edge. 

My english is probably a bit rusty, but still, I think I was in the
thread, and trying to help… I’m a french talking Belgian, and
believe me, I know what means “recoupe”.

This being said, it could be a good oportunity for you to step back
and check your posts in different conversations these last weeks. Do
you realy think you’ve been constructive or even at least helpfull
for people? At the beginnig I thought it was some kind of humor…
[]! For what I saw, you seem to be a good jeweller… So what do you
think about staying humble and do what you do best… Lets say you
sudenly wanted to change people, than, please consider my little
advice: following my experience being nice will help you reach your
goal… With all my considerations to your work…

Best wishes,
Ced


#11
This being said, it could be a good oportunity for you to step
back and check your posts in different conversations these last
weeks. Do you realy think you've been constructive or even at least
helpfull for people? 

Now I am confused. You said that recoupe is bright cutting around
grains. I said that there are no grains in recoupe technique. Now you
are saying, that I am not constructive and not helpful.

Do you think that given wrong is been constructive and
helpful ?

It has nothing to do with language. It has to do with technique
itself, whether you know what it means or not. As simple as that.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com