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Flux glass?


#1

When trying to melt down some sterling silver scrap, I added a little
boric acid (about 1/2 tsp). After trying several times (even getting
it to the melting point, but then solidifying when I tried to pour it
into the ingot) a dark maroon colored coating appeared on both the
silver and the crucible. It is smooth and shiny and hard. Looks like
it was enameled actually. I remember someone in passing mentioning
something about the appearance of flux glass, but not sure what that
is or if that is even what I am dealing with. Does anyone know what
this is and how it can be removed. I would like to save both the
crucible and the silver if possible. Thanks in advance.

Heather


#2
Does anyone know what this is and how it can be removed. I would
like to save both the crucible and the silver if possible. Thanks
in advance. 

It is perfectly alright to have crucible covered with flux. Flux from
metal is easily removed by pickling. I have a short clip showing how
to reuse scrap metal.

http://www.ganoksin.com/benchtube/video/688/Frugal-Goldsmithl

While clip was shot with 18k gold, the actual difference is very
slight. It is a decent introduction to the process.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#3

It’s melted flux. Don’t remove it from the crucible, and pickle your
silver to remove it from there.


#4

Sounds like you have a coating of Borax flux on the metal and your
crucible. No big deal… put the silver into your pickle pot heat it
up and the flux will dissolve. The crucible is a little harder just
take a carbon rod if you have one or stainless steel and heat the
crucible up and scrape out the flux until you get it to where you can
live with it…

It only takes a little flux to do the job. I use a salt shaker and
sprinkle a little on the metal with practice you will see how much
it really takes to keep the metal shinny in the melt.

By the way 20 mule team borax soap is the same thing you buy at the
jewelry supply house for $$$$ more :slight_smile:

Vernon Wilson