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Flush setting of heart shaped stones


#1

Hello all. I have a number of heart shaped cubic zirconia which I
would like to flush set into some jewelry. I want to set about 100 of
these stones, in sizes of 4, 5, and 6 mm, into a large bracelet and
would prefer to flush set them rather than using prong settings. Does
anyone have any suggestions for an easy way to set these stones? I
have set one or two by using a graver to carve out the seat, etc, but
since I plan on setting such a large number, I was hoping for an
easier way to accomplish this. My initial thoughts were to drill a
small pilot hole and then make a chasing punch to form the seat
around the hole. Of course, it would still require some clean-up with
a graver, but any other ideas would be welcome.

Thanks to all and Happy Holidays,
Jim DeRosa
James DeRosa, Jr.
140 Clifton Drive
Boardman, OH 44512-1616
330-782-0702


#2
    "Hello all. I have a number of heart shaped cubic zirconia
which I would like to flush set into some jewelry. I want to set
about 100 of these stones, in sizes of 4, 5, and 6 mm, into a large
bracelet and would prefer to flush set them rather than using prong
settings. Does anyone have any suggestions for an easy way to set
these stones?" 

Hi Jim, I have an idea, based on a series of gem carvings I once
did, with inset faceted stones. Although I’m barely a newbie at
flush setting, I think something similar could work for you… What
I did was to measure both the width of the stone and the approximate
circumference of each of the two lobes atop the heart. Once I had
that measurement together, I’d trace it with a suitable scribe onto
the material in question, then drill pilot holes in the center of
each lobe and the center of the “V” point. Then, I’d gradually
enlarge the lobes until they were just shy of my target size, and
enlarge and shape the “V” with a diamond-plated 3-square needle
file.

I think that if you were to follow that same path, but then
substituted a #2 or #4 needle file, driven downward at ~= a 40
degree angle (with the file’s point aiming down towards the heart’s
cleft), you’d be able to achieve a perfect seat for all sides but
the cleft, itself (which is usually unseatable, anyway). Whatever
remains of the “cleft point” in the metal, then, would serve only as
a decorative finial, to preserve the appearance of continuity. If
you try this out, please let me know how you fare; I’m more than a
little curious!

Hope this helps, and Happy Holidays,
Doug Turet
Douglas Turet, GJ
Lapidary Artist, Designer & Goldsmith
Turet Design
P.O. Box 162
Arlington, MA 02476
Tel. (617) 325-5328
eFax (928) 222-0815
anotherbrightidea@hotmail.com