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Florentine burr


#1

Good day everyone,

Quite awhile ago there was a post from someone who mentioned using a
Florentine burr for their flex shaft.

Does anyone remember this?

Thank you,
Laurie


#2

You can still buy a “Florentine” Graver. But here is the neat note
on them, they will have two numbers on the side of the graver. e. g.
“10-14”.

The #10 means the number of digging teeth per cut, and the #14 is
the width size. As a setter, I haven’t seen or used them for years.
but hand-engravers use them often in their patterns. They even come
as a curved or a flat tool, they can be used inside of curved
surfaces, so very handy to have! BTW, when you are using them, the
finish is about 90 degrees to each series of cuts. It’ll appear like
this .

But the whole idea is not to cut too deep, mainly to mark the
surface of the metal.* It’s used as a fill-in, in flat engraved
areas.* Basically, a cutting pattern in between the engravers’
design.

Looks absolutely great when used with graver line-cutting! I know you
were asking about the bur, but I thought I’d put my few cents worth
in, on this topic…Gerry Lewy


#3

Laurie I don’t recall the post but have used a Florentine burr
before. What is your question?


#4

That may have been me. I do have a couple of florentine burs but
seldom use them any more. I used them a lot when I worked in fast
paced repair shops.

If I was sizing a florentine finished wedding band I’d use it to
touch up where the size seam was. Speed was paramount in those shops
so no time for hand engraving. Now that we do just custom I can take
my time and do it by hand if needed.

I have two. One is a flat sided cylinder and the other is flame
shaped with a point on one end to get into tight spots.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#5

Laurie,

Gesswein has two wheels that will work. Good luck.

Dede


#6

Hi Laurie. I started a thread on this-maybe that’s what you are
remembering. Specifically because I had purchased a florentine bur
from Rio many years ago which I love because it produces nice
parallel lines as a design element. They actually offered three
sizes and I was thinking of getting another size but Rio no longer
carries them and the other ‘florentine’ burs I’ve purchased from
other vendors don’t produce the same pattern. They produce an almost
sandblasted effect. Nice but not what I was expecting.

I did find one on line that looks like my original but I didn’t buy
it.

Mary Lyons