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Flooring for studios


#1

Question - I have seen places that had the thick rubber floor mats
that came in “tiles” and interconnected. I use the thick rubber mats
wherever I stand a lot (got mine from Grainger), and I am wondering
how they would work for the whole floor?

The issues with concrete have been covered. As one with allergies
who lives in a hot/humid climate, carpet would be out for me. It
holds dust, mold, mildew, etc., etc.!

I have wood floors in my jewelry “studio” as it is in my house
proper, but concrete in my art studio, which is sort of under the
house and houses my VERY heavy printing press and paper press. My
concrete floor is finished smooth, and painted with a commercial
concrete paint. It has been there 10 years now, and works very well,
no moisture problems, etc. As I said, I have the rubber pads in the
places where I do a lot of standing, so the concrete has not been a
problem for me - on the other hand, I don’t do my jewelry down there,
and the idea of a stone hitting the concrete floor makes me cringe!

You can also purchase “wood” flooring that is really a laminate, and
can “float” on top of whatever subsurface you have. That might be an
option.

Best wishes!
Beth in SC where it is finally genuinely cold (in the 30’s F!)


#2

My flooring choice has worked well over a poured concrete slab. I
cut sheet masonite into “tiles” 24" x 12". I then pre- finished
them with an oil based sealer and installed them as I would a
ceramic tile. I used mastic as an adhesive and grout in between
them. They look great and work really well!

They offer the resiliency and contrast that I need for all of those
run-away parts and fragile stones, they offer a warm wood-floor feel
to the space, but they also have an interesting stone-like look
(probably because of the grout lines). Without looking carefully,
it is difficult to see that it is only masonite. It is
inexpensive, and has been on the floor during many rainy seasons
without lifting or buckling. I am very happy with the choice.

I would be happy to email a photo of the floor to anyone interested
in seeing it.

Karen
Karen Olsen Ramsey
http://www.artjeweler.com


#3

Beth Wicker asked

Question - I have seen places that had the thick rubber floor mats
that came in "tiles" and interconnected.  I use the thick rubber
mats wherever I stand a lot (got mine from Grainger), and I am
wondering how they would work for the whole floor? 

On a related matter that may be of help to you, I have thick rubber
matte-finish rubber tiles (not interconnected) that are glued to the
floor in my bathroom and half-bath (that is, bathroom minus the tub).
The tiles are intended for use in locker rooms and are rugged. They
tend to look a little dusty, but clean OK with a vacuum cleaner and
clean very well with ammonia in water or other liquid cleaners. They
come in various colors (I have black).

Daniel Kamman
www.industrialjewelry.com, www.consultant.com


#4

I may be coming in late here, but my recommendation for a studio
floor is dense particle board. We have had it in two studios now and
love it. Every once in a while someone asks us what it is and we
tell them imported cork.

We put down full sheets 4’x8’ and screw them down. Then we’ve coated
them with a floor polyurethane. They look great, don’t dent the
jewelry and the price is right.

Hope this is helpful.

Carla


#5

How about trying putting down the plastic floor protectors for
hardwood floors…just cut away the bubbled up areas of the tiles.
Places like Staples, Office Depot , Office Max, etc sell them. They
come in various sizes. Lilyan Bachrach