Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Flex shaft tools


#1

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I have
seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft tool.
I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the greater
versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or opinions about
the different tools would be helpful.

Thanks,

Ken Hunrichs


#2

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I have
seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft tool.
I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the greater
versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or opinions about
the different tools would be helpful.

Thanks,
Ken Hunrichs

I would like to add a question to Ken’s question, I have developed a quirk
for doing work under a 10x microscope because of the extreme precision I can
get. One problem I have with this is I can never get flex shaft burs that
are really
small enough to do all that I would want to. I’m just wondering if anyone knows
of perhaps another profession that might use smaller burs that I could possibly
use for my purposes.

        Richard Laspada never does anything normal <bg>

#3

Ken,
Personally like fordom, Have always had one…They make a variety
of models, an assortment of handpieces, in multiple price ranges .
I own five fordoms , three of which are different models, But have chosen
to use same handpiece on all machines. I use foot reostats on all units
as I feel it gives more control…I’ m sure that many othrer companies
make these units, Just as good, possibly less expensive…
MY two cents
Best wishes
cj
Kenneth L. Hunrichs wrote:
I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I
have seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft
tool. I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the
greater versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or
opinions about the different tools would be helpful.
Ken Hunrichs

G.B.A. Ltd.
Gemstone Brockerage Associates Ltd. Telephone (518)
438-5487
P.O. Box 8930
Albany, New York 12208

INTERNET ADDRESS Http://www.bizpro.com/gba
Http://www.polygon.net/~3576
Email adresses
3576@polygon.net
@j.lanese
gba@bizpro.com

MEMBER OF POLYGON NETWORK, INC. POLYGON # 3576
MEMBER OF JEWELERS ADVISORY GROUP ( JAG )

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR EMAIL LIST OF GEMSTONES, DESIGNER CABOCHONS, FACET AND
CAB ROUGH


#4

Kenneth L. Hunrichs wrote:

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I have
seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft tool.
I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the greater
versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or opinions about
the different tools would be helpful.

Thanks,

Ken Hunrichs

orchid@ganoksin.com

Ken - I use a Foredom “R” series flex shaft, which I prefer for it’s
ability to torque at very low speeds. It makes a great stone setting
shaft. In addition, I use the quick change flexible handpiece - Foredom
makes a good one and so does Pfingst. In buying the handpiece, the
extra dough for a better quality one really does pay off.


#5

Kenneth L. Hunrichs wrote:

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools.
Richard Lucas makes by far the finest flex shafts . I don’t know that
you can find them anymore tho.Stick with your basic Foredom flex shaft.


#6

Hi Richard

I’ve been working under a zoom scope for years, doing some of my setting
and carving under up to 40 power. I also have a tool called a gravermax
which has 2 air hammers and a high speed turbine which uses 1/16" burs.
My favorite miniature burs are the tiny rounds that get as small as .3mm
on a 3/32: shank. I also like to use tiny inverted cone burs for setting
bagguettes. The light touch you get with an air turbine is ideal for
working under high magnification, but as you have noticed, tiny burs are
scarce. Look to the dental supply houses for 1/16" burs. I have also
made some burs myself for the most delicate work, it’s amazing how
simple unusual shapes will cut gold at very high speed (400,000 rpm).

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830

Richard Laspada wrote:


#7

Jeffrey Everett wrote:

Hi Richard

I’ve been working under a zoom scope for years, doing some of my setting
and carving under up to 40 power. I also have a tool called a gravermax
which has 2 air hammers and a high speed turbine which uses 1/16" burs.
My favorite miniature burs are the tiny rounds that get as small as .3mm
on a 3/32: shank. I also like to use tiny inverted cone burs for setting

Gee you guys and I thought my ball peen hammer, chunk of railroad rail
and a couple of 16 penny nails were precision tools.Now we have
something that blows alot of air and spins a handpiece??What
next?))…Seriously, I have a Pfingst flexshaft machine that I have had
a number of years and it has been very good and have had virtually no
problems with it.


#8

I’ve been working under a zoom scope for years, doing some of my setting
and carving under up to 40 power. I also have a tool called a gravermax
which has 2 air hammers and a high speed turbine which uses 1/16" burs.
My favorite miniature burs are the tiny rounds that get as small as .3mm
on a 3/32: shank. I also like to use tiny inverted cone burs for setting

Thanks for the input, where does one get those .3mm burs?

       Richard Laspada

#9

Richard Laspada wrote:

I’ve been working under a zoom scope for years, doing some of my setting
and carving under up to 40 power. I also have a tool called a gravermax
which has 2 air hammers and a high speed turbine which uses 1/16" burs.
My favorite miniature burs are the tiny rounds that get as small as .3mm
on a 3/32: shank. I also like to use tiny inverted cone burs for setting

Thanks for the input, where does one get those .3mm burs?

           Richard Laspada

The usual sources Richard, Gesswein is where I get mine. Their order
line is 1-800-243-4466. They’ll send you a catalogue is you ask.

Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830


#10

Check with your dentist,

Mind generally uses the same size but he also has some with smaller shafts.
I have tried to use some of his ‘to-dull-throw-outs’ really not very good.
But the smaller ones that he wasn’t using are great … these were for
polishing. . a porous ceramic like material.

Jim

At 06:21 AM 10/11/96 +0000, you wrote:

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I have
seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft tool.
I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the greater
versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or opinions about
the different tools would be helpful.

Thanks,
Ken Hunrichs

I would like to add a question to Ken’s question, I have developed a quirk
for doing work under a 10x microscope because of the extreme precision I can
get. One problem I have with this is I can never get flex shaft burs that
are really
small enough to do all that I would want to. I’m just wondering if anyone
knows


#11

Ken’

Thanks for the question… Finally I can contribute for a change… not
much, but just a little! . . Feel guilty always asking and never
contribution…

I have two… The only name here is, Foredom. I have two different speeds
but both variable by a foot pedal. Max speeds are 15K and 18K really don’t
see the difference relative to cost and of course the 18k was more costly.

Problem that I wasn’t advise or ware of was the difference with bur speed…
there are High speed and I guess Low speed … the real difference is that
the high speed, which I purchased, cut pretty d… fast for a beginner… to
fast for doing cuts around prongs, etc. Also I am aware that the dremel
burs have larger shafts that do the Jewelers burs… Not a problem but you
have to adjust/key the standard Foredom head which requires a key
adjustment from one but shaft size to another . . bother!! Wish I would
have gotten a quick adjusting head on one of the Foredoms… lots of $$$
when getting started.

Tried several bur enhancers/perseveres … currently use only that ‘old high
school’ sports favorite, …Oil of Wintergreen… I’m sure there are some
who will recall!!!

Now if you are looking for cheap, And I mean cheap, Two end, polishing
tool, I can put you in business(as least here) for $50.00!

Look forward to hearing from others … particularly about head… would
like to purchase a ‘hammer head’ … understand this is the easy way to do
channel sets … I’ll just bet this gets attention as I have been advised
of many, many ways to do channel sets the EASY WAY… DON’T REALLY BELIEVE
THAT I’VE BEEN TOLD THE BEST YET!

Let’s here from the Pros,

Jim

At 12:50 AM 10/11/96 -0400, you wrote:


#12

Jim: if you go to buy a hammer hand piece for your Foredom, buy Foredom’s
version. I goofed and bought Gesswein’s top of the line model, its a great
tool but its Swiss made and the TIPS are 10-20 bucks apiece! Foredom’s tips
are five dollars. Unfortunately, I didn’t know Foredom made a hammer
handpiece unti too late…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#13

Jim Chambers wrote:

Ken’

Thanks for the question… Finally I can contribute for a change… not
much, but just a little! . . Feel guilty always asking and never
contribution…

I have two… The only name here is, Foredom. I have two different speeds
but both variable by a foot pedal. Max speeds are 15K and 18K really don’t
see the difference relative to cost and of course the 18k was more costly.

Problem that I wasn’t advise or ware of was the difference with bur speed…
there are High speed and I guess Low speed … the real difference is that
the high speed, which I purchased, cut pretty d… fast for a beginner… to
fast for doing cuts around prongs, etc. Also I am aware that the dremel
burs have larger shafts that do the Jewelers burs… Not a problem but you
have to adjust/key the standard Foredom head which requires a key
adjustment from one but shaft size to another . . bother!! Wish I would
have gotten a quick adjusting head on one of the Foredoms… lots of $$$
when getting started.

Tried several bur enhancers/perseveres … currently use only that ‘old high
school’ sports favorite, …Oil of Wintergreen… I’m sure there are some
who will recall!!!

Now if you are looking for cheap, And I mean cheap, Two end, polishing
tool, I can put you in business(as least here) for $50.00!

Look forward to hearing from others … particularly about head… would
like to purchase a ‘hammer head’ … understand this is the easy way to do
channel sets … I’ll just bet this gets attention as I have been advised
of many, many ways to do channel sets the EASY WAY… DON’T REALLY BELIEVE
THAT I’VE BEEN TOLD THE BEST YET!

Let’s here from the Pros,

Jim

At 12:50 AM 10/11/96 -0400, you wrote:

I am interested in hearing from your group about flex shaft tools. I have
seen several companies that make simular products but there must be
differences which I should look for when shopping for a new flex shaft tool.
I have been using a dremel tool for a while and would like the greater
versatility and power of a flex shaft tool. Any comments or opinions about
the different tools would be helpful.

Thanks,

Ken Hunrichs

orchid@ganoksin.com

orchid@ganoksin.com

Jim,
Well me here again and I bought a cheap 50 dollar hammer tool from
Alpha Supply and wish I would have gotten the expensive one…Channel
setting is best done with a setting tool by hand in my opinion although
I am not heavily into the diamond(faceted stone) setting thing.The
hammer handpiece is a bit radical and you best have sticky spit or the
stone will end up elsewhere if you try and use the hammer handpiece for
setting.I use mine for a varity of surface textures mostly on
silver…Gavin…


#14

Dave,

Done at the right time!!! Would have gone to Gesswein… However, always
understood that the swiss made the better products of nature, ie, burs,
tweezers, at least according price and advertisements

Jim

At 04:25 PM 10/13/96 -0800, you wrote:


#15

Dave,

Done at the right time!!! Would have gone to Gesswein… However, always
understood that the swiss made the better products of nature, ie, burs,
tweezers, at least according price and advertisements

Jim

Jim, yeah the thing is probably really well made but I doubt the Foredom
hammer handpiece is any less, but saving nearly 100 bucks is worth it and
besides the Swiss hammer has metric threaded points and can’t find a cheap
substitute. Hopefully the Foredom is american threaded but for five bucks a
tip you can’t go wrong. One of the Swiss tips is 20 bucks! For a tiny piece
of metal, yikes!!! Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#16

At 02:05 PM 10/17/96 -0400, you wrote:

Dav

Jim: if you go to buy a hammer hand piece for your Foredom, buy Foredom’s
version. I goofed and bought Gesswein’s top of the line model, its a great
tool but its Swiss made and the TIPS are 10-20 bucks apiece! Foredom’s tips
are five dollars. Unfortunately, I didn’t know Foredom made a hammer
handpiece unti too late…Dave

For the last few years I have been using the Badego hammer handpiece. I
find it far superior to any other hanpiece on the market. It has a great
weight and feel in the hand and doesn’t get as hot as the others out there.
I’ve tried them all and have a drawer full of scrapped models. my 2 cents
worth. Dna