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Flattening objects


#1

Has anyone got a better way of flattening say 8 gauge 1 inch round
jump rings, or 2 inch diameter sheet, than placing them on a piece of
leather or cardboard and hammering them ? Thanks, Peter Slone


#2

Have you tried using the Hydraulic Press to flatten your jump rings,
or using the mill on a “dead roll”? Helene


#3

Peter, Flattening is an art to itself. My favorite method is to use a
flattening hammer. This is a piece of bench top equipment that has a
spring loaded vertical ram with a flat steel face. When you slam it
down hard with your hand, the face slams into the flat base of the
tool, with enough force to flatten just about anything a jeweler
could ever make.

In actuality, I cannot imagine making something really flat by
hitting it onto a soft leather or cardboard surface.

Alan Revere


#4

Peter, I flatten my sheet stock and junp rings in a Hydraulic press. I
place them between two sheets of stell and press. The steel needs be
polished of course or else surface texture is transfered. I also use
a piece of 18 ga nickel silver on one side when i need jrings that
are flat on one side and half round on the other. The nickel silver
has just enough give to form a sort of die that lets the top of the
jump ring stay round and flattened on the bottom. Hope that makes
sense. Frank


#5
 Has anyone got a better way of flattening say 8 gauge  1 inch round
jump rings, or 2 inch diameter sheet, than placing them on a piece
of leather or cardboard and hammering them ?    

What is "2 inch diameter sheet??? Have you tried placing said objects
betwee the padded jaws of a large vise and firmly squeezing them
straight? How flat do you want them? Are we talking “all parts
parallel to a given plane,” or are we talking “reduce * gauge to half
its original thickness?” Think rolling mill in that instance. Lots o’ luck.
Mike


#6

Peter hello! For the jump rings you need to flatten try an old valve
from an engine head. If you drop in to an auto machine shop, they
will have plenty. I have never been charged. You then need to grind
it perfectly flat and polish if you wish. Probably 1/2 hour minimum.
Soften the tip that you will hit with a hammer so it doesn’t crack
and splinter. They are well tempered. One of my often used, favorite
tools.


#7

Alan - I’ve never heard of a “flattening hammer”. Where can you get
one of these items? Gini


#8
My favorite method is to use flattening hammer. This is a piece of
bench top equipment that has spring loaded vertical ram with a flat
steel face. 

Where can I find this or see a picture of one?

Alan, you probably already know, but the cardbord ( the thin kind
from the back of manilla envelopes) or leather is placed on your bench
block and the object is hammered on top of that. And your right, it
doesn’t make them exactly flat but gets some pieces darn close. I also
use this method to make a flat piece of metal ever so slightly convex
enabling me to sand the top without rounding the edges and corners–
something like a medallion, cross or a pendant.


#9
    Alan - I've never heard of a "flattening hammer".  Where can
you get one of these items? 

When you are refering to a “flattening hammer”, do you mean a FLATTER
used by blacksmiths?

A flatter looks similar to a hammer except the face is flat and about
2" X 2" square. The side opposite the working face is flat, round
and much smaller than the working face.

Set the object to be flattened on an anvil. Set the flatter on top of
the object with the square face down. Hang on to the flatter handle
keeping the square working face parallel with the top of the anvil.
Strike the back of the flatter head with a hammer of the appropriate
size. Repeat the last step as needed to get the desired affect.

With steel, this is done with the steel red hot. Softer metals may be
flattened cold.

There are many blacksmithing tools and technics which also work, on a
smaller scale, in a jewelry fabrication shop.

I hope I have been helpful.

John


#10

A quick note on using a Blacksmith’s “FLATTER”. They look like but
are not hammers, they’re hardened and tempered to be held against the
metal being shaped and small head hit with a hammer. Also keep the
face as smooth and/or polished as possible, mirror finish to get a
mirror finish, all marks on “FLATTER” face will transfer to your
metal.