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Flat Bed Scanners


#1

We have been using a flat bed scanner for quick pictures to be used
in insurance documentation reports that we often provide for a
significant purchase. The scanner works well for this purpose but
has some limitations. The biggest problem is it really only allows
for a head-on shot of rings looking straight down at the gemstones,
or a flat profile view. Most ring photos would benefit from a 3/4
view showing the top and some of the sides, giving you more of the
sculptural sense of the ring. I have a sense that the scanner has a
shallower depth of field than a camera so less of the object can be
in focus. (The scanner is great for flat objects like old coins.) I
suspend rings in a shallow, white lined cardboard mailing box, with a
slot in the bottom to hold the shank, the center stone resting on the
scanner bed. It is very easy to import the images into Word
documents. Because of the simplicity of the set up I think it might
be useful to you for certain things, but not a particularly a good
record of your work.

Anthony Toepfer


#2

anthony - to get your 3/4 profile of your rings on a scanner, since
you already put the shank into a slot in white cardboard, why not
hold the ring at the angle you want for the profile & cut an
upsidedown ‘U’ in the cardboard at that angle, bend cardboard into a
’tent’/sandwich board & then scan it - works for me when i need a
better shot than my digital sometimes camera from hell will give -
good luck - ive


#3
...anthony - to get your 3/4 profile of your rings on a scanner, 
since you already put the shank into a slot in white cardboard, why
not hold the ring at the angle you want for the profile & cut an
upsidedown 'U' > 

Ive. Following your suggestion, I find that I can get very
acceptable 3/4 view ring shots with my scanner. What an elegant
solution for the problem, kudos to you and Orchid. I cut the U flap
in the bottom of my white lined shallow box. I am also pleased by
the amount of the ring that is in focus. What advantages do you find
that the digital camera has for you?

Anthony


#4

anthony - just back from an art show - (another exercise in
re-assessment of criterea for judging potential customers & composing
new, esoteric, vitriolic cusswords describing rain!) & found your
post, thanks! the real advantage to the scanner for some jewelry
shots seems is the detail you can get due to the closeness of the
light source versus distance necessary for getting the whole image
with the digi cam. i shoot my other pieces by eastern exposure from
noon to 5:00pm; the proximity of the 8x8 window to the water where i
live has a great effect on larger pieces, but not on detailed smaller
ones. if you ever have to shoot polished spectrolite or labradorite,
do it by daylight - it turns the fire into a beacon! ive