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Firescoff bottle?


#1

While I think Firescoff is s pretty good product, I don’t really
think it is worth the price. It was $25 last time I checked. maybe
more by now.

The bottle it comes in, on the other hand, is really nice. It sprays
a really fine, even mist that dries instantly when it is sprayed on
hot metal. The other sprayers I have tend to have larger droplets
that make for a less even coat.

All this is by way of explanation for why I could use one or more
empty Firescoff bottles, if there is anyone out there who uses it
regularly, so they have extras lying around.

I will be happy to pay mailing costs.

Thanks!
Noel


#2

Hi Noel,

I’ve been meaning to post this for some time but haven’t yet. I too
liked the Firescoff bottle, but eventually it would clog and no
amount of cleaning would clear it.

I found a really good alternative. It’s called a Misto olive oil
sprayer. I know you can order it from Amazon but a search on the web
might point you to a local brick and mortar shop that carries it.

It operates by pump action. The body and lid is aluminum and can
build up nice pressure, especially if the sprayer is only about half
full. It produces a nice fine spray. I believe it sells for $10 and
has lasted longer than any plastic spray bottle I’ve used in the
past.

Larry


#3

Firescoff is VERY expensive for working on holloware, but worth the
price for jewerly making/repairs.

Jeff Herman
hermansilver.com


#4

I have the top of the bottle. if you need one I would happy to send
one to you…

Andy The Tool Guy


#5
While I think Firescoff is s pretty good product, I don't really
think it is worth the price. It was $25 last time I checked. maybe
more by now. 

Well it’s debatable.

Firescoff replaces three products.

  1. it’s a flux,
  2. it’s a heat shield, &
  3. it removes the need for pickle.

If you buy pickle, flux and thermal paste, you pay just about the
same.

However if you don’t need to play with acids that’s a win in my
books.

On a side note I sell all of the above products in the store, so I’m
happy for people to buy whatever they like :slight_smile:

Regards Charles A.


#6

Hah! I had a Misto bottle, which I used for-- wait for it-- olive
oil! It suffered the same fate you describe-- it became terminally
clogged. How long have you used one for flux? Has it kept going
longer than the plastic ones?

Noel


#7

I have been using a Firescoff bottle filled with Prip’s for a couple
years. It has such a great spray. Periodically I run the top under
very hot water tobreak up any firecoat that has clogged up in there.
I prefer Prip’s but keep some Firescoff around for coating 14K gold
cause it really seems to help. Will hang onto an extra bottle for
you. -Carrie


#8
While I think Firescoff is s pretty good product, I don't really
think it is worth the price. It was $25 last time I checked. maybe
more by now. 

I think I am posting this tenth time.

combine dry borax and boric acid in 1 to 1 ratio.

fill up container to the rim (I am using old stove coffee pot
without cover) add water to the mixture, whatever it will take.

optionally add a bit of phosphoric acid. If you do not have one it
works well without it.

To use it.

It is solid when it’s cold, so bring it to gentle simmer on the
stove.

Dunk an item and you ready to go. It solidifies on contact.

A cupful will last you years. The cost is less than a buck.

It performs better than any commercial product.

The only reservation, it can produce heavy coat.

If thin coat is desired, solution has to be boiling.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#9
......fill up container to the rim (I am using old stove coffee
pot without cover) add water to the mixture, whatever it will
take.

Make sure you do NOT use tap water!!! Use distilled water! Tap
water usually has all kinds of undesirable stuff in it…

Janet in Jerusalem


#10

I spoke to a friend today, and he thinks Firescoff is an awesome
product.

He doesn’t like the area effect of the spray bottle, so he modified
the bottle by gluing on a thick needle from a syringe.

This way he gets to apply the Firescoff where he wants it to go.

I thought is a simple and practical solution, worth sharing.

Regards Charles A.


#11
I spoke to a friend today, and he thinks Firescoff is an awesome
product. He doesn't like the area effect of the spray bottle, so he
modified the bottle by gluing on a thick needle from a syringe. 

After reading Charles A. comments, I offer two suggestions regarding
flux.

Reuse a body spray bottle for Prip’s flux - be SURE to keep the
little cap. At the end of the day, fill the cap with water, invert
the bottle and insert it into the cap so that the water covers the
spray hole. Store the bottle inverted until next use. Guys, this is
an opportunity to gift your lady. and don’t forget to ask for the
emptied body spray bottle AND COVER.

If you have a diabetic friend who injects insulin, ask for some used
syringes. Fill them with your flux of choice (I like Batterns). You
can place a minute drop of the flux exactly where you want it. To
keep the needle tip free from clogging, fill the needle cover with
water and carefully put the needle back into the cover. I made this
easier to use by filling a heavy ash tray with plaster of paris and
put the needle cover (opening up) into the plaster so that when
hardened, the cover is secured.

Easy then to put the syringe into its cover, and to remove with one
hand with no danger of piercing yourself!

Of course we mess with sharp objects all the time, but why not be
cautious.

Judy in Kansas


#12
Reuse a body spray bottle for Prip's flux - be SURE to keep the
little cap. At the end of the day, fill the cap with water, invert
the bottle and insert it into the cap so that the water covers the
spray hole. Store the bottle inverted until next use. 

Thank you. Now that you’ve suggested this, I can’t imagine why I
never thought of it. For my diamond sprays I’ll use alcohol instead
of water.

BTW, 2 ounce fingertip sprayers are available at Walmart for a
dollar each in the “trial and travel” section of the “health and
beauty” department.

Al Balmer
Pine City, NY


#13
Easy then to put the syringe into its cover, and to remove with
one hand with no danger of piercing yourself! 

Grinding the sharp tip off the syringe will make it considerably
safer to use. I’ve used this method on a number of the horse-sized
horse syringes I reuse for various purposes on the bench and in the
barn.

Linda in central FL


#14

Firescoff and USED INSULIN SYRINGES

UH. FOLKS - IF YOU GET SOME USED INSULIN SYRINGES EVEN FROM A
FRIEND: first mix bleach and water and rinse, the syringe with the
mixture (1:5) at least 3 times to insure there aren’t ANY BLOOD
PRODUCTS left in the syringe. PERIOD! Second Sally Beauty supply sells
a vast variety of controllable spray tops that fit on any size screw
top bottle some go from ultra-fine mist to pin-point application and
they cost about 2 dollars with tax if you aren’t a hairdresser on the
side. the sprayers also have a lever that closes off the spray
functionality and disallows any evaporation. If the stem that goes
into the liquid is too long for your size firescoff bottle just cut
to length or cut a bevelled end and allow to slightly curve at the
bottom to get all the product out.

Personally I prefer Cupronil, unless you are an enamellist, then the
"ceramic" additive purportedly in the Firescoff can help with
non-wet packed methodologies. rer


#15
Personally I prefer Cupronil, unless you are an enamellist, then
the "ceramic" additive purportedly in the Firescoff can help with
non-wet packed methodologies. rer 

Can you please explain more about how this helps in enameling?


#16
If you have a diabetic friend who injects insulin, ask for some
used syringes. Fill them with your flux of choice (I like
Batterns). You can place a minute drop of the flux exactly where
you want it. 

May I suggest that rather than using a “sharp”, talk to someone with
access to medical equipment and acquire a “blunt”.

These are needles that are manufactured without a sharp point. They
are also available in some sizes from places like Rio Grande for
epoxy work.

Also, rather than using a syringe use a small squeeze bottle (like
eye drops come in), glue in just the steel part.

Steam out the cap occasionally, to keep the tip clean.

Mark Chapman