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Fine art resin


#1

Recently I started working in Resin, and I love it. Now I want to
incorporate with sliver creating Fine Art Resin. The pour over a
picture is fine but I want to create resin bracelets on sliver and
other jewelry on sliver.

I have read a few books but no one really explains the attaching of
it.

Kathie Murphy’s book is good but still vague.

I also want to experiment with flexible resins to layer if for
abstract cuffs and other jewelry.

The few artist I contacted responded like I want trade secrets,
bordering on rude. One went as far as saying it had taken her years
to perfect it and she was telling know one.

All I asked was give me a direction to look, some clue where to go.
I am willing to do the work to get there. Any help in this direction
would be appreciated.

Anyone in the southern Michigan teaching resin?

Jane A Wilhelm
Artist/Designer


#2

Kathie Murphy is a great tutor! If you find a course with her dont
miss it


#3

Resin…

I have worked with resin a lot. It’s beyond easy and very fun with a
lot of fun applications. I’ve done layered photos in pendants like a
timeline in separate dried layers of resin or mixed in pigments and
even mixed in dirt, grass, bugs, sticks. If I mess it up I burn it
out in my kiln and start over. Resin can be filed, sanded, and
drilled. Please contact me offline for the list to go on and on.
joy@joykruse.com. I am sure there are endless online resources on
Youtube for great resin projects as well. Just experiment. It really
is very simple. It’s really like using see through glue. My favorite
resin is Envirotex which is a 1 to 1 polymer coating. It takes 24
hours to dry. It can be purchased at a home improvement store in the
paint section or at Dick Blick art supplies and I am sure many other
sources. No affiliation just have used that same product for atleast
10 years. There are lots of others… Have fun. joy kruse


#4

Go to Google and type in transparent 2 part epoxy casting resin.

Ive just done that and theres a wealth of suppliers AND u tube
tutorials out there.

That will give you enough to start with.

The few artist I contacted responded like I want trade secrets,
bordering on rude. One went as far as saying it had taken her
years to perfect it and she was telling know one. 

Re your para 5, its quite reasonable to keep ones hardwon knowhow to
oneself.

When you have some special knowhow youve developed, dont give it
away!! Its your commercial edge in the tough old world out there.

I have developed a way to forge titanium 1/4in thick by 18in dia
into bowls.

Id be stupid to tell the world how its done.

If someone wants to do that they will have to struggle like I did to
find the way.


#5
All I asked was give me a direction to look, some clue where to
go. 
I am willing to do the work to get there. Any help in this
direction would be appreciated. 

Perhaps the book by Shari Haab would help you.

And, check for workshops by the company Smooth-on, whose regional
affiliates offer high quality, low cost workshops in mold making
(which you will need for your resin casting).

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#6

Jane,

Here is an Orchid post from May 2010. I have a necklace painted with
Colores three years ago and the color is still good and has not
chipped. I wish Orchid would schedule another class. I would take it
again. Mary

I have used the Rio product, Colores, which is a resin, to paint
on sterling. I have used brushes and for very fine lines, I have
used toothpicks and hat pins. I also use the syringes for mixed
colors. You simply mix the colors in one of the plastic cups
that is provided with Colores then pour it in the syringe. 

If you use the paint brush, you need to immediately wash the
brush when finished so it can be used again. I wash first with a
simple green product and then wash with goo gone. 

When painting with Colores, the first color must be dry before
the second color is added. Drying time is minimum 36 hours for
each color in areas of high humidity. I have ignored the long
drying time and applied a second color after 12 hours and for
certain things the colors bleed together in an attractive way.
However, this is not always the case. 

From an Orchid posting in Sept 2008 the following may help.

Colores is sold in the Rio catalogue. Read the instructions very
carefully. The colors are wonderful! The application is
challenging. It takes time to stir the colors and to mix the color
and the hardner. It takes time to learn to use the bottles with the
syringes. The drying time is minimum 24 hours. 
On my last piece I applied a second color after 23 hours and the
colors ran together on the sterling. I am in the process of
removing two layers of Colores and re-reading the instructions. 
I will be sure I allow 72 hours for drying when I re-apply the
Colores. Now that I better understand the process I like it. 
Rio teaches a Colores class occasionally. I took the class in
Feb 2005 from Bruce and he was a good teacher. In the class, we
practiced on wax paper. After I bought the kit, Anne Larsen
allowed me to use her studio with five of her students and we
"played" with Colores. Everyone was trying something different. 

Ideas were flying all over the room. Someone was always saying "
Look at this!" and we all learned significantly from working
around the same table and reviewing each others experiments. 

The positives are fantastic color; non-toxic; clean-up with soap
and water then Goo Gone; you can drill with a flexshaft cleanly
through Colores on sterling; you can wipe the plastic cups clean
and use again; you can knock a mixing cup of Colores off the
table onto the floor and it stays in the cup when it hits the
floor. 

The negatives are difficult instructions; long drying time often
dependent on weather and humidity; it will finger print at 72
hours under some conditions; Colores can spill during shipment
even though it appears very tightly closed; difficult to achieve
hi lite effect as it is not possible to duplicate "puffing"; you
must work on a completely level surface or your work can slide;
if you use an oven to dry the first color, you cannot use the
oven for a second color without damaging the color of the first
layer; you need color mixing skills.

#7

Jane, As you pointed out, you have just begun working with resins. I
can understand why some artists may not want to share their special
techniques with you just yet. These processes have been developed
over time, there are no tutorials, it is trial and error. It is not
always rudeness, try experimenting on your own and find your way of
working with the materials. Once you have your voice, other artists
will be more open to share with you. Best of luck in your
experimentation! Jennifer Merchant


#8
Recently I started working in Resin, and I love it. Now I want to
incorporate with sliver creating Fine Art Resin. The pour over a
picture is fine but I want to create resin bracelets on sliver and
other jewelry on sliver. 

I’m assuming you meant “silver” here. but nevermind…

Start with the admittedly somewhat condescending comment of:

There’s nothing wrong with, and a lot to be said for, doing your own
research, making the inevitable mistakes, and working out what really
works for you,

There seems to be somewhat of a trend in this field, developed over
the last several decades, where people (sometimes newcomers) expect
to be given entire techniques and methods just for the asking, with
no effort or research required.

Often, they expect this all to be delivered in a quick weekend
workshop. Now, that’s fine as far as it goes, and if you can find
such a workshop, by all means take it. But remember, those folks from
whom you’re learning, probably had to work a whole lot harder for
that info that you’re expecting to. Now, nothing wrong with hoping to
avoid that, just understand where people are coming from.

You can read directions and books, and still be unclear if, in the
end, you don’t really understand the material. And the main way you
get there, is to use the material. Experiment. Try things and see how
they work. Be bold! Don’t shy away from trying things you are not
sure will work. Be willing to waste some material on experimentation.
Keep in mind that there is almost never any single way to do things,
or a single way from which one must never deviate. If that were the
case in metals, we’d all be still beating on raw native metal chunks
with a rock, and that’s as far as the technology would have gone.
Invent.

Explore. You’ll likely waste some material and time, but it’s no
waste, and you can send the metal scraps in for refining and get most
of the value back. It’s how those who already know the field, got
there, and it’s why people like that artist you contacted get rude.
They feel they paid their dues, and went through the process, and
perhaps rightly feel a bit miffed that you feel they should just give
it all away to you for free. I know that feels rude to you, but
unless they are in the business of teaching, why should they just
give you that could easily allow you to go into direct
competition with them six months from now? Pay your dues, do the
work, work it out for yourself. Then those same people will be
colleagues, not just those with whom you might compete. Approach them
then on those terms, and you’ll likely find much more acceptance.

And for a start, a really good start, instead of looking for books,
start with the manufacturer of the resins you’re considering. You can
be sure they already have reams of technical info on what their
materials can do, how they should be used and applied, what they will
adhere to, and all the rest. Go to the source for the best info. Talk
to their engineers and chemists. If I want to know about sterlium
plus silver, I can come here to Orchid and ask those who use it.

But I’ll get better results if first, before doing that, I have a
long talk with the metallurgists at United Precious Metals, who make
the stuff, or with the experts at Stuller, who represent and sell
that alloy. The same can go for most of the technical materials we
use in this field. Now, it’s not always this way for everything. You
can buy tools, for example, from many tool dealers whose business is
the selling of tools, and maybe even the making of them. They may not
always be experts of the actual use of those tools. But for
manufactured materials like resins, alloys, and the like, start with
the manufacturer. They’re likely making the stuff for industry, which
will have exacting needs technically and for on the
material to match those uses. Your needs are likely to be much less
exacting than the total amount of info they’ll have on the stuff.

Once you have the technical info on the material, you’re in a great
position to start playing with your own methods.

Peter Rowe


#9

Nicely said Jennifer! I do work in Resin and have done so for the
last 10 years. I used Kathie Murphy’s book as a starting point and
also in recent years have found Carles Codina’s book “the New
Jewelry” extremely helpful.

I do share some knowledge but not everything - it’s a niche market
and those that succeed with resin are those who are prepared to work
and work and work at it. My techniques are shared with other resin
makers who as Jennifer said “have a voice” and who I know on the
’circuit’ here in the UK - they too are self taught and although we
work in the same medium our work is not the same - we usually have a
good old moan about how difficult it can be!

The basics are out there for everyone and that should be where you
start from. The fine points will show themselves if you are willing
to experiment and learn, usually from your mistakes.


#10
Jane, As you pointed out, you have just begun working with resins.
I can understand why some artists may not want to share their
special techniques with you just yet. 

It also depends on context. If one is taking a class in something,
then the context is that the teacher is there to share her knowledge
and the student has paid for this transfer.

If someone is at a fair, working in their booth, and someone comes
up and asks how do you make it? that’s not the right context, and of
course the person will be turned away.

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#11

There’s a show up in Chicago right now of medium scale resin work.
(Large scale to us jewelers.)

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep80m5

The artist’s site is here:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep80m6

Click on the pictures to make them larger.

They’re quite nice, in person.

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#12

Resin inlay used to be very frustrating for I had all kinds of
bubbles, and wet sanding always left my resins looking crappy. After
TA-ing back in the spring for a resin workshop, I came home with lots
of new skills. A heat gun or heat embossing gun is necessary for
popping bubbles as you mix the 2 part expoy and once you pour it into
the mold, heat it a bit to pop the remaining bubbles. I find Devcon
quick setting expoy to work really well. Add a smidgen more hardener
when you miss the resin and hardener so that you can make sure your
resin hardens properly.

Pearl Ex pigments (made with mica powder) is georgous in inlay,
giving you color with great depth. Pastel pencils, acrylic paint, eye
makeup, even nail polish, all work well. Do sample colors to see how
they look and cure.

Also, UV Magic Glos by Lisa Pavelka, which cures under UV light,
comes in a small container, no mixing needed, and cures crystal
clear, plus it domes very nicely. I do use the heat gun to pop
bubbles so that I have a very even dome. Do thin layers, and build
up in separate curing stages rather than one thick layer that does
not cure well. Cure for severalhours under UV light for best
results. Does wet-sand well. Have used microbeads encased in UV
resin but some colors run. Magic Glos does notlike water-based
colors, so you have to use dry colors.

I’ve thrown my resin-inlay jewelry in the tumbler with abrasive
media, as well as steel shot, and holds up beautifully.

Just tips on resin.
Joy


#13

Hi

Once you have the technical info on the material, you’re in a great
position to start playing with your own methods.

I make resin pieces and set them in silver. How I make my pieces of
"Black Opal" resin. Is a trade secret.

However here is some advice.

You need an industrial fume extraction unit to do the resin work in.

Resin is very poisonous.

If you can smell resin it is killing you.

You need vacuum extraction on the bench pin when working on resin,
it’s dust is an irritant and toxic.

Use a swan’s down buff with stainless steel polish to get a high
finish.

Richard


#14
I find Devcon quick setting expoy to work really well. 

It’s worth nothing that the quick setting (such as their 5 minute or
faster) epoxies are less resistant to water and the effects of time,
than are slower setting epoxies. In jewelry worn near skin, for
example, the quick setting epoxies will tend to yellow and get kind
of rubbery over time, more quickly than the slower setting ones, in
part simply due to exposure to perspiration or other moisture.

Peter


#15

Do resins give off a toxic oder when heated–are they safe to work
with?

Sandra
Elegant Insects.com


#16

Richard Hopkins’ comment:

You need vacuum extraction on the bench pin when working on resin,
its dust is an irritant and toxic. 

Thank you for mentioning that fact. I fell in love with resins in
the late 1960s when I began to study silversmithing. I invested a
great deal of money in supplies but when I began working with them, I
realized the dangers; I never touched the stuff again. As an opera
singer, I was/am acutely aware of toxic materials.

Perhaps in my next lifetime I’ll get to explore resins.


#17

Peter

I can see we have had different experiences with expoy. In my many
years of using expoy, I found that Loctite expoy is yellow, and
never really cures properly. When I started using Devcon 2 part
expoy, I had muchbetter success. Usually cures, and stays clear. The
trick is to adda little more hardener when you mix the expoy - at
least 55% percent hardener to 45% resin. Also using heat to pop the
bubbles and make it more fluid makes it easier to work with.

Having stuff that was expoyed together many years ago, old resin
inlay jewelry, so forth, it has held up very well, and if I use
expoy with enamel powder, it’s really tough to destroy it. If I do
have a batch of expoy that did not cure properly, I remove it and
start over again and thesecond time is good.

Bottom line - Loctite expoy is sh%#, and Decvon is much better. But
then you may disagree with em and that’s up to you. All I am saying
is that from years of experimenting, I found what gives me
CONSISTENT results. Since I am a production jeweler, I must have
consistentity.

For the rest of you on Ganoksin, all I can say, you have to
experiment. Otherwise, how else will you learn? Trial and error is
what makes things a success or a flop.

Joy


#18
I can see we have had different experiences with expoy. In my many
years of using expoy, I found that Loctite expoy is yellow, and
never really cures properly. When I started using Devcon 2 part
expoy, I had muchbetter success. Usually cures, and stays clear.
The trick is to adda little more hardener when you mix the expoy -
at least 55% percent hardener to 45% resin. Also using heat to pop
the bubbles and make it more fluid makes it easier to work with. 

Not really that different. I too like the Devcon epoxies (I also
like the Epoxy 220 and 330 lapidary products when real strength and
durability is needed), and I too find them quite good. My only
comment was that the fast setting types are less water resistant over
time. If the work isn’t exposed to a lot of humidity, perspiration,
etc, then it makes no difference. and the five minute stuff isn’t
bad, mind you. It’s just that the slow setting stuff is almost rated
for marine use (almost. I’m exaggerating a bit here.) The 5 minute
material won’t withstand that.

I’d also note that almost all epoxies are quite sensative to the
ratio of resin to hardner. A ten percent mismatch in the ratio, as
you suggest, can reduce the bond strength by more than half, though
that figure is generic to epoxy, and not specific for Devcon, which
may be formulated to be less sensative. But the higher performing
epoxies all require exact proportions for full bond strength and
durability. This by the way, is part of the reason why some epoxies
are packaged in a relatively costly double syringe design and
automatically gives you equal proportions. Barring that, however,
industrial high performance epoxies usually suggest actually weighing
the two parts, not mixing by eye. However, mismatching the ratios, as
you suggest, while it reduces the bond strength, does make the
material a bit more flexible. In situations where resiliance to
flexing is more important than bond strength, this may be a desired
effect, rather than the error it would be in industrial uses.

Peter


#19

This is all So confusing! Is this stuff “safe and nontoxic” as I
believed or toxic and “it’s killing you if you can smell it”?


#20

Hi all

Do resins give off a toxic oder when heated--are they safe to work
with? 

Resins give off highly toxic fumes. All safety precautions should be
followed when working with resins.

As I said in a previous post, if you can smell resin it is killing
you, I am not kidding.

Richard