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Finding articles for assignment

I’m having trouble finding some I need for an assignment
I’m doing and am hoping someone out there might be able to help. I
am investigating the topic of “jewellery as art” and need to be able
to refer to recent journal articles (or other writings) that discuss
this topic - either agreeing that jewellery can fit into the art
category, or arguing against it.

If anyone can think of any articles from the last couple of years
where this topic comes up please let me know.

Thanks heaps,
R.R. Jackson

Try Peter kunz’s Curious lore of precious I have a first
edition and it is very informative

Ringman

articles (or other writings) that discuss this topic - either
agreeing that jewellery can fit into the art category, or arguing
against it. 

The Orchid archives are a gold mine for you!! Of course, they’re
written by people who are mostly doers, not critics, so maybe the
positions aren’t valid for a “real” reference paper. (That’s
sarcasm, for those out there that don’t recognize it.) :wink:

Tas
http://www.earthlywealth.com/

R.R. Jackson,

I can not offer any specific articles written on the subject but a
search on the internet of magazines such as Jewelers Circular
Keystone (JCK), National Jeweler, Modern Jeweler and Lapidary
Journal might help.

I would like to point out that although jewelry is looked upon as
the poor cousin of art it is in my opinion the definitive medium in
two and three dimensional art.

The steps that a piece of jewelry goes through in many cases is
identical to that of a bronze sculpture or that which an abstract
metal artist uses only in miniature.

Take for example a bronze sculpture of an animal. The artist will
carve the piece in either clay or wax and then have it cast in
bronze. Now imagine a jeweler doing the same process only in a
miniature scale.

As for the abstract metal artist, he will take such metals as scrap
iron and weld them together to create his sculpture. the jewelry
artist will use precious metals instead to create their art.

Then there is the Lapidary Artist that will take a raw Gemstone and
either faceted it, create a cabochon, or carve it to create a
sculpture or abstract. This is much the same as an artist would do
to a piece of Alabaster or Marble.

And lets not forget about the Cameo Carver or the Artist that does
Hand Engraving on Precious Metals.

It is a shame that the Jeweler is not looked upon with the same
respect as an artist. The talent is the same except that our work
is completed in far smaller detail.

Yes there are examples of poor quality, unimaginative jewelry in the
world as there is poor quality unimaginative art in the world.

The beauty of jewelry as a medium is that it is ART TO WEAR.

Good luck on your project.
Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com

Have you checked out past issues of Metalsmith?

marilyn smith

    It is a shame that the Jeweler is not looked upon with the
same respect as an artist. 

Hi Greg and other Orchidians;

The distinction that the established “fine arts” artists use to
distinguish themselves from “craftsmen” goes back to the
Renaissance. The first ideas were put forth in a book by Vasari
called “The Lives of the Artists”. In that book, the true artist was
described as a “Renaissance Man”, someone whose primary role was that
of a man of ideas, author, musician, painter, sculpture, scientist.
Da Vinci was the prime example of such a character. Since then, “fine
art” has lauded itself over the lowly crafts by presuming to be about
ideas primarily, and medium secondarily. What crafts will have to do
to establish themselves as equally invested in the higher destiny of
mankind and the pursuit of “truth” is to establish it’s own
aesthetic. Wherever it tries to break into the credibility circles
of the other fine arts by using the same systems of ideas, it fails.
Here’s an old feminist adage to explain it:

“You cannot take down the master’s house using the master’s tools.”

What it means is this: The status quo makes the rules, and rule
number on is . . . the status quo will judge the success of the
efforts of anyone trying to meet it’s standards. Simple enough?
Kinda like the “golden rule” . . i.e., he who has the gold makes the
rules.

It is complicated to explain here, so I won’t try, but there is one
possibility I’ve seen so far that might win out, not against the
established fine arts, but for itself. It’s called a “process
aesthetic”. Check out Paul Smith’s “Poetry of the Physical” for some
insight into this theory. Naturally, it will have to be applied to
crafts within their own set of venues. In other words, crafts must
develop not only it’s own system of measuring the depth of the work,
it must do so in it’s own world of markets, critics, and audience. I
think that is happening in some places, such as in the case of Daniel
Brush’s work. It is a bit eastern in it’s nature too. Consider the
Japanese potter, Hamada. Crafts with a spiritual component. Big
money makers such as Al Paley and Dale Chihuly are part of it, but
they have so much showmanship around their work it’s hard to measure
the effect of their ideas. They go straight to “sexy” and “eye
candy” before there’s any talk of poetry or human condition. I’d
also suggest that the origins of this idea need to be somewhat
politicized, and there’s no better source of that ideology than the
writings of Thomas Ruskin. Forget the “fine arts”. . . let them
implode further. Meanwhile, the dialogue of the new crafts
aesthetic, which is really not so new, needs to continue. That gets
back to my beef with Metalsmith. It has dropped the ball on that
fertile potential.

David L. Huffman

 What it means is this:  The status quo makes the rules, and rule
number on is . . . the status quo will judge the success of the
efforts of anyone trying to meet it's standards.  Simple enough?
Kinda like the "golden rule" . . i.e., he who has the gold makes
the rules. 

Does this mean that the Jewelers of the world make the rules since
we have the gold!

Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com

Does this mean that the Jewelers of the world make the rules since
we have the gold! 

Hi Greg;

This reminds me, I need to get a tee-shirt that says, “Jewelers
Rule!”.

David L. Huffman