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[Featured Product] PEPE Jump Ring Maker


#1

The perfect set for winding your own jump rings easily in consistent
sizes. Includes 20 steel winding rods in 2.55 to 12.5mm diameter
sizes, Jacobs chuck for winding jump rings and attractive wooden
base for easy part selection and storage.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1fr


#2

Hi

I’m sure it is but unless you’ve got a fordom it won’t fit - I’ve
had one for over a year & am still hoping I can come up with a way
to fit it on my Proxxon pendant drill. Sutton’s suggested wrapping
several sheets of A5 paper around the pendant to be able to secure
it in the PEPE jump ring maker but it’s a bit dodgy. Any other
suggestions will be most welcome!

Best regards
Gill

Gill Bridgestock
gillbridgestock.net


#3

I make jump rings by wrapping wire round a rod- I grind flats on the
end of the rod so I can hold it in the vice with the end of the
wire. I wrap the wire round, then saw the rings with a piercing saw.
I have lots of different size rods for different size jump rings.

I make lots of hand made chains, and making coils and sawing jump
rings takes minutes, I don’t need any gadgets to do it. Sometimes the
simplest ways are the best!

Annette


#4

I have a suggestion. Sell it. Then go to garage sales and thrift
shops…take your millimeter gauge with you…and buy old screw
drivers in various assorted sizes. Take them to your shop and, using
a hack saw and belt sander, lop off the driver ends, smooth the
burs, and using the hack saw, cut slits in the top of each. Now you
have a set of jump ring mandrels. Dust off your jewelers saw and use
it to cut the jump rings.


#5

I am downright low tech when it comes to making jump rings. I have a
number of wooden dowels in different diameters which I get at the
local hardware store. I drill a hole near the top of the dowel,
insert my wire to hold it in place, then wind the wire around the
dowel. Using my jewelers saw, I saw away and get all the jump rings I
need, and I use a lot in my work. I have wound round wire, half round
wire and even square wire with this method.

There are some expensive tools that I will splurge on without
batting an eye, but often will just improvise on others.

For the world of me I cannot see the need for a special jump ring
maker when an inexpensive wooden dowel will do the job.

Alma


#6

In answer to you post concerning jump rings. You are missing out on
the many opportunities for additional products, designs and time
savings that are possible if you use the proper equipment. For
instance, can you make large hoop earrings from flat wire with the
flat side facing out? Can you make oval, square, triangle or diamond
shaped jump rings and control just where the cut will be? Can you
hand-saw a 5" long coil in 5 seconds or a 15" coil in 15 seconds?
These are just some of the advantages you would have by using a
genuine Jump Ringer - not Pepe’s copy of it called Jump Ring Maker.
While Pepe’s is less costly than our Jump Ringer, you get what you
pay for. The additional versatility and precision of the Jump Ringer
will soon make you forget the price difference.

Ray Grossman
Ray Grossman Inc.
Mfrs. of Jump Ringer


#7

I bought a Pepe jump ring maker and use the mandrels all the time,
but I quit using the saw device within a month of getting it. For
one, the saw blades are expensive and wear out with only a very few
uses. Beyond that when I saw the coil with my jewelers saw I get a
much cleaner ring, no burs etc. It is quick and handy to use the
mandrels in the crank device. At first I made long coils from long
pieces of wire, but now I make coils about an inch long and use
lengths of wire only about a foot long. I wrap my coils in blue
painter’s tape and it makes them easy to control while I saw them. I
also use one of those little finger “gloves” from the Rio catalogue
to keep from cutting my finger. Was the jump ring maker worth the 100
plus dollars I paid for it? NO WAY!

Dick


#8

To All Jumpring makers out there…I just had to reply to this
thread on the Pepe Tool Jumpringer… I did make jumprings with
wooden dowels forever. It does not take much time and it works fine.
On the flip side of that…the Pepe Tool jumpringer is the
’bomb!’ I take every steel dowel that the jumpringer comes with and
I make jumprings in every mm size in seconds for a years supply at a
time… I keep them in a box labeled with the sizes and keep the
box well supplied. Everything is perfect like you ordered it from
the store. I love it. I love it for repairs because I always seem to
need some goofy size jumpring. I love it for making my own chains.

I actually put the mandrels in a electric drill, wind up spools of
wire into the coils, oil, cut and have hundreds of jumprings in
seconds… So, I guess that yes, you could spend the time doing it
like you always have but for the $130 I spent on that jumpringer I
have made every cent back in time. If you do not use hundreds of
jumprings a year it is not worth the money. If you use hundreds of
jumprings it’s fantasic…making short work even shorter. I am not in
anyway a part of Pepe Tools just love that jumpringer tool. :wink:

joy kruse


#9

Hi I have to admit that having succumbed to the sales blurb I was
very disappointed to find my pendant drill was too small for the
cutting guide shield.:frowning:


#10
I actually put the mandrels in a electric drill, wind up spools of
wire into the coils... 

If you make your own wire, be ultra careful when winding wire up
using an electric drill. Sometimes even the best jeweler winds down
her mill too fast and makes burs which can turn into really painful
splinters after the drawplate.


#11

Pepe Jumpringer: the saw blades are expensive and wear out with only
a very few uses… I have used the same blades for years (4 years
actually)… I have never broken one. You have to oil the coil
with tap oil. I then leave the cut coil of jumprings in the groove of
the jig and run a stainless steel wire (about 18inches long) through
the coil. I keep loading the stainless steel wire with jumprings
until it’s full of hundreds of jumprings and close the stainless
steel wire in a huge circle like a big bracelet. I toss it in my
largest vibratory tumbler with dish soap/water/tumble few hours or
moRe: voila! perfect, perfect, perfect, beautiful shiny jumprings by
the hundreds. :wink:

joy kruse


#12

Has anyone tried making one? I got a chuck for about $7 at Harbor
freight, hooked it to a piece of threaded rod I bent into a handle on
my vice and ran through a block of wood. For Mandrals I am using a
drift punch set from harbor freight, I think that ran me $20. I made
a V-block out of a board to help with cutting them and use a diamond
disk sold by (yep, you guessed) to cut new slots in stripped screws,
I think that ran me $6 or $7 for a couple of them and a mandrel.
Easy, works just as well. I put some tape on the handle so it is nice
to my hands. Ben


#13
On the flip side of that.......the Pepe Tool jumpringer is the
'bomb!' 

While the Pepe tool does work, people should try to keep in mind that
the name “Jumpringer”, and the design, is the original work of our
own Ray Grossman. His idea, his engineering work and design work, and
marketing to develop an appreciation and demand for this tool. Good
ol Pepe then comes in, blatantly copies the thing without needing to
do any of the inventive or creative effort, and tries to present it
as somehow their legitimate idea. It’s a copy. A Knockoff. It may be
cheaper than Mr. Grossman’s tool, but when you buy it, you’re
supporting an unfortunate, often unethical, and if it violates
patents or trademarks, then illegal, practice. Ray produces his tool
right here in the U.S.A, as well, not some undefined location on the
far side of the globe doing the American economy no real good. You
folks aren’t too happy when some other slimeball wannabe jewelry
designer copies your designs and markets them as their own, so why
would you buy a tool that’s doing the same thing? Pepe tools produce
some fine products following long traditional designs, and even some
tools that they have actually innovated and developed themselves, and
there’s a fine place in your shop for such items if you like. But I’d
suggest that tools that are clearly copies of someone elses original
idea should be looked at with a degree of reluctance to buy at the
least, if not outright disdain. Just my two cents…

Peter Rowe


#14
I bought a Pepe jump ring maker and use the mandrels all the time,
but I quit using the saw device within a month of getting it. For
one, the saw blades are expensive and wear out with only a very
few uses. 

I also bought a Pepe jump ring maker (because the Jump Ringer was
significantly out of my budget at the time) and I also abandoned the
saw device. The blades are indeed the weak link in that equation.

I too get much a cleaner cut on the rings sawing them by hand but I
have yet figure out a way to keep hold of the coil that doesn’t
result in hand fatigue quickly. I’ve tried tape on the coil, keeping
the coil on a wooden dowel and sawing through it, mounting the blade
in my saw upside down. Still can’t manage to cut more than a few
rings before my holding hand cramps up. Those of you that hand saw
your own rings, what’s the secret to holding the coil?


#15

I had to pipe in on this thread. I also have a JumpRing Maker and I
love it. I make all my jumprings at once in different metals. I
tumble them and then store them in individual containers with mm
size and metal type. I do this at least once a year and it was worth
the investment five years ago. I have made them using wood dowels and
I do on occasion make the odd sized jumpring this way but when I need
to make alot really fast the jump ring maker is the way to go. Make
sure you oil your coils and use bur life on the blade. I replace my
blade maybe once every two years if that.

Monica


#16
You folks aren't too happy when some other slimeball wannabe
jewelry designer copies your designs and markets them as their own,
so why would you buy a tool that's doing the same thing? 

Could not have said it better. It blows my mind to see so many on
this forum praise knock off tools but whine about the proprietary
nature of of their own designs.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#17
I actually put the mandrels in a electric drill, wind up spools of
wire into the coils... 

Here is a tip I use when making coils. It is much easier on the
hands. I always clamp the wire in a ring clamp to hold it tight
against the mandrel. This helps me hold the wire tight and also not
get splinters in my fingers (just in case) I can move the ring clamp
along the mandrel and it holds the wire more uniformly so I get
better coil control.


#18
While the Pepe tool does work, people should try to keep in mind
that the name "Jumpringer", and the design, is the original work
of our own Ray Grossman. His idea, his engineering work and design
work, and marketing to develop an appreciation and demand for this
tool. Good ol Pepe then comes in, blatantly copies the thing
without needing to do any of the inventive or creative effort 

Sorry to offend by buying a knock off but I did not even know
another product was available…Marketing is key I guess.:wink:

joy kruse


#19
Those of you that hand saw your own rings, what's the secret to
holding the coil? 

Due to arthritis, for coils and anything else that will fit I use a
GRS Benchmate. Fantastic. The whole system is great.

I get a kickback for saying this. So?

(just kidding)
Neil A.


#20

Here’s one thing that doesn’t come with the Pepe system…The
support system on how to use the system.

I had problems at first. I called and talked to Mr. Jump ringer his
self. Found out what I was doing wrong in about 2 minutes, and also
how to use the system to its best advantage. That, in itself, was
worth the price of admission.