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[Favorite tips] Sizing


#1

Many ring mandrels measure ring sizes differently than the ring
sizers used to measure the customers’ finger, resulting in an
improperly sized ring. One method to avoid this problem is to purchase
several sets of plastic ring sizers. Take apart the sets of sizers
and organize them by finger size in a plastic compartment box with a
snap close lid. Then measure the customers’ finger with these sizers
and place the correct sizer in the job envelope with the ring to be
sized. Then the bench jeweler will have no questions as to the size
to make the ring. When finished, return the ring sizer to the tray
for future use.

Brad Simon CMBJ


#2
  Many ring mandrels measure ring sizes differently than the ring
sizers 

Great tip, Brad! Where were you a couple years ago with this?!? :slight_smile:
I was pulling my hair out on a wedding band I made that was sized
"correctly" but still didn’t fit! Come to discover that at some point,
my ring sizers and mandrel no longer correlate properly. Folks out
there might want to get their ring sizers and mandrels together to see
if they actually match up through the progression of sizes! I just
assumed standard was standard… can save you a lot of agony, stress
and embarrassment if you’re aware of any deviation in advance.

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com mailto:dave@sebaste.com
http://www.CarolinaArtisans.com


#3

This issue is actually one of my pet peeves. We discovered the
discrepancy between ring sizers and mandrels 4-5 years ago. We have
never been able to satisfactorily resolve the problem. I also talked
to a number of our suppliers about it to no avail. Not only don’t the
ring sizers and mandrels match but all of our mandrels are different
as well. I believe the only solution is to throw everything out and
start by sizing the sizers on a mandrel and only using those. Of
course we have never done this since we own more than a dozen mandrels
and I can’t bear to throw any of them out. Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.

Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-491-6000
@spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#4

When sizing rings with heat sensitive stones in silver I always place
the stone under water. However, the water draws heat off the ring
(as if silver was not bad enough on it’s own). To help the situation,
I place a small piece of firebrick through the finger hole of the
ring. I use a piece 12 mm X 5 mm X 30 mm. This helps protect the
stones but more importantly it reflects the heat back up to the
bottom of the shank. This makes sizings MUCH easier. Brad Simon CMBJ
www.BWSimon.com


#5

Paint whiteout over engraving on the inside of rings before sizing
or soldering wedding sets together. This will keep the solder from
flowing over the engraving. Brad Simon CMBJ www.BWSimon.com


#6
Paint whiteout over engraving on the inside of rings before sizing
or soldering wedding sets together.  This will keep the solder from
flowing over the engraving.

Carefully painting the edges of millgrained wedding bands can keep
solder from flowing into the beads and groove.

Rick Hamilton

Custom gold and platinum jewelry
CAD/CAM and conventional modelmaking


#7

When rounding out the rings from sizing use a double face mallet,
brass on one side nylon on the other. Use the nylon side to
straighten out the ring shank. Like a rawhide mallet it will bend
the shank but not stretch it. Then if the ring is a little too small
(quarter size or less) turn the hammer around in your hand and tap
across the seam with the brass side. This saves time from putting
down the rawhide mallet and picking up a steel hammer then going
back to the rawhide mallet. Brad Simon CMBJ www.BWSimon.com