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[Favorite tips] Bracelet mandral


#1

ref your request for an oval bracelet mandrel

I found an inexpensive metal mandrel at the supplier that was
oval shaped with steps on it. I use it a lot and the shape is
great. I think I paid around $20.00 for it.

Joe

Joe Kilpatrick
Expressions With Metal
@jeweler
http://www.expressionswithmetal.com


#2

Hi - I had a friend cut a bracelet mandrel on a lathe out of a
fairly hard length of wood (can’t remember what wood it was) -
for when I had to do events on site. It was an idea that worked

  • much lighter to carry and allowed me to slightly reshape a cuff
    bracelet without marring the surface. Not sure if an oval could
    be cut on a lathe - that would be a great idea.

Also discovered when holding work while shaping - that wearing a
thick cotton glove on the holding hand helps to take the shock
of the blows. This one may be embarrassingly obvious - but you
never know . . . Wonderful thread! Cynthia (who just discovered
banjo! :slight_smile:


#3
I had a friend cut a bracelet mandrel on a lathe out of a
fairly hard length of wood (can't remember what wood it was) - 
for when I had to do events on site.  It was an idea that worked
- much lighter to carry and allowed me to slightly reshape a cuff
bracelet without marring the surface.  Not sure if an oval could be
cut on a lathe - that would be a great idea. 

There are a very few specialty lates that can be used to make
ovals, andmost of these are for picture frames. However, a
round mandrel can be re-shaped on a sander to produce an oval.
This is easier than forming the oval by sawing, or with the
sander alone. It is also possible to create an oval by first
turning a round taper, then moving the center of the turning by
taking the drive spur and the tail center a “calculated” amount.
It may be necessary to make this move in increments. The only
way I know to get this “right” is to experiment on cheaper wood,
then use that knowledge on the final piece. This method will
leave a surface that is a series of intersecting arcs, with a
line where these arcs cross. It will be necessary to sand these
lines smooth.

I am a passably good woodturner, and have been thinking about
this project lately. When I get around to doing it, probably in
the next few weeks, I’ll post my success – or failure!


#4
     I had a friend cut a bracelet mandrel on a lathe out of a
fairly hard length of wood .....  Not sure if an oval could be
cut on a lathe - that would be a great idea. 

G’day; Yes, an oval can easily be cut on a wood lathe - I’ve
done it. One turns a bit of hardwood to a gently taper, leaving
it too large. Then where the tailstock centre mark is, draw a
line through it, bisecting the end of the wood. Make 2
centrepunch marks equidistant from the old centre on this line.
Partly return the wood on one centre, then change to the other
centre. Sand, and that’s it, an El Cheepo oval mandrel. If you
have access to a wood lathe. –
John Burgess


#5

Whoever started this thread, thanks! Its great!!

Some years ago when I wanted to make wide neckwires I didn’t
have a stake or a mandrel so I found this piece of hardwood out
in the garage. Something my son found somewhere and carried home
to add to his ‘collection’ of useful objects. It is 15" in
length, the small bulb is 2" dia, and the large oval bulb is 3"
dia. Although I now have one of those neck mandrels I still use
this wood thingy because it is easy to hold, light weight and a
light sanding once in a while keeps it smooth so the metal is
unmarred.

Hey, now that I have a digital and Hanuman gave us the FTP site
to use I put a pic of it up there

If anybody knows what is was, please let me know. If they come
in other sizes I’d like to get another one for other uses.

Nancy
Nancy Bernardine-Widmer
Bernardine Art Jewelry
http://www.bernardine.com