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End caps and Nickel


#1

Two questions:

First:

I’m searching for end caps for 2mm cord. I’d prefer plain,
closed-end cylinders without a hole or eye pin, but I’d accept almost
anything that will fnish the end of 2 mm cord. I have a lot of black
satin rattail and I’m determined to use it. I’d like to finish the
ends, but I don’t want to spend the time making my own caps. Copper,
brass, rich low brass, bronze, sterling silver are all acceptable.
3/16 - 1/4 inch in length (4-6 mm).

Second:

What about nickel? How does it react to the environment? Does it
tarnish? I think it gets darker with time but I’m not sure why I
think that. I have an allergy to nickel myself, so I know not to use
it in anything that touches the skin. I’d like another white metal to
use, in addition to silver, but not white gold, platinum, or
aluminum.

Orchid rules.
Christine, in Littleton, Massachusetts


#2

Christine -

Rio has some varieties of end caps in their Gems & Findings catalog

  • if you have the latest one there are some on pages 345 (coupled
    with hooks) and more on page 536 – although I would prefer plainer
    ones myself I ordered some of these just the other day out of
    desperation. Hopefully some other Orchidian will have a better
    suggestion, but maybe these will help if you get desperate.

Best,
Jessica, cording it up in SF


#3
I'm searching for end caps for 2mm cord. I'd prefer plain,
closed-end cylinders without a hole or eye pin, but I'd accept
almost anything that will fnish the end of 2 mm 

Christine, Mettalliferous in NY has SS plain end caps with 2mm
openings. I have seen end caps in brass in their store, but I don’t
know the sizes available. The telephone # is 1-888-944-0909. Joe Dule


#4
    Mettalliferous in NY has SS plain end caps with 2mm openings. 

Thanks, Joe. Do you mean totally plain? No eye or hook? I don’t see
them in their catalog. The ones I see in their catalog (p.36) have
either an eye or a hook on the end, so they’re not exactly what I
want. They do, however, have some tube beads (p.19) that seem to be
just the right size for capping off; at least I wouldn’t have to cut
the tubing if I just used beads and sheet. I want to finish the ends
of the cord but knot it, not use any sort of clasp.

Miscellaneous question: On the same page as the tube beads are
"liquid silver" beads. I’ve always wondered what that means. Are they
silver or something else? If silver, what does “liquid” refer to?

Christine in Littleton, Massachusetts, who wants you to know that no
one deserves lung cancer.


#5

Christine, Liquid Silver is the name given to the appearance of
multiple strands of these fine silver cylindrical beads.

They are at least sterling, but many times fine silver beads simply
strung end on end, no knots and worn in strands of 10 to 30. A very
elegant appearance, one I love.

Initially they were straight cylinders, later versions the cylinders
were slightly twisted catching the light in different ways.

Needing to be economical, I once bought several ounces of unstrung
beads planning to string them myself, forget it, I never did. I have
always wanted one of the 30 strand necklaces.

Sort of before your time,
Terrie


#6
    Initially they were straight cylinders, later versions the
cylinders were slightly twisted catching the light in different
ways. Needing to be economical, I once bought several ounces of
unstrung beads planning to string them myself, forget it, I never
did. I have always wanted one of the 30 strand necklaces. 

I read somewhere, perhaps in a Rio Tip, to put the beads in an
annealing pan, get your beading needle and string ready, and then
just stick the needle into the pan and spin it.

If you don’t have an annealing pan, you could buy a Lazy Stan pantry
organizer – they sell them at the container store – and put a
shallow bowl on top of it.

Elaine Luther
Chicago area, Illinois, USA
Certified PMC Instructor
@E_Luther


#7

Elaine, Lazy Stan, eh what, love it. Do you think centrifugal
force would line up those cylinders and march them right up the
needle? I wish. One day I will again come across them and give them
another look see.

I still love those necklaces.
Thanks,
Teresa


#8
Elaine, <BG> Lazy Stan, eh what, love it. Do you think centrifugal
force would line up those cylinders and march them right up the
needle? I wish. One day I will again come across them and give
them another look see. I still love those necklaces. Thanks, Teresa 

Hi Theresa. Yes. Centrifugal force does it and The Bead Spinner
Lady sells a couple of outfits to do just that. Kind of costly but
simple: The base has a smooth-pointed vertical shaft which telescopes
easily up into a hollow spindle that is in the center axis of the top
(bowl) section. The top of the hollow spindle is compressed a bit so
as to capture a steel ball (bearing) that is just rolled into the
tube before placing it on the shaft of the base. The bowl is a
turned wood scooped-out bowl (think torus-shaped interior). You place
your beads in the bowl -don’t overfill :slight_smile: - and spin the bowl by
hand, insert a special slender, curved needle into the whirlpool of
beads and “ta dah!” you’re in business.

http://www.nfobase.com/html/beadspinner_lady.htm

No connection, no benefit. She was in a booth adjacent to mine at
the show and I saw demos.

I think you could use a bowl with a similar shape, tack it to the
center of a lazy susan with double-faced tape and use a "long eye"
needle by just shaping a bit of a curve to its leading edge. Of
course you’d want to curve the needle toward the side of the eye
opening, rather than its top or bottom. You could shape the needle
against a smooth bench block or other hard surface with a polished
burnisher. The “long eye” needle should be available where beading
supplies are sold; it is very flexible, slender and is open most of
its length.

Hope this helps you get your necklace made.

Pam Chott
Song of the Phoenix