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Electro melt problems


#1

I inherited an electromelt furnace and think it’s a wonderful tool,
but I am having a problem with it. When I pour, the graphite liner
slips part way out splashing the molten metal. Apart from the obvious
danger the spilled metal has wrecked some casts by being on top of my
vacuum table instead of in the flask. Am I missing something here?
How do I pour without the liner slipping?

Cheers,
B


#2

Dear Bryan

After you stir the metal with a carbon rod you hold the rod against
the top of the graphite liner against the electromelt. The liner will
not fall out that way.

Take a file handle and fit the carbon rod into it during use. Other
wise the rod may get too hot to handle.

Best regards,
Todd Hawkinson
www.southeastmn.edu/jewelry


#3

I’m assuming these are induction melters, they sort of look like a
heavy duty coffee pot.

If that’s the case you could stuff some Kaowool to pack the
crucible. You’d have to harden the Kaowool to make it safe (the
fibres are nasty).

Or you could add a safety clip that snaps over the crucible.

Regards Charles A.


#4

Hi Bryan,

I know there are people who do pour electromelts like a coffee
thermos, but I always used the funny little tongs that come with them
to pull the crucible (liner) out (hot) and pour directly from the
crucible. Much less fooling around, and it’s easier to aim.

For whatever that’s worth,
Brian


#5

I hold it with my pair of tongs…

Here is a video (not mine) demonstrating it… you will see it
toward the end:

Christian


#6

To all:

Just a note of clarity.

The Electro-Melt by Kerr does not have the melting crucible come out
of the unit to pour. You pick up the whole unit to pour. Placing a
carbon rod behind the crucible prevents it from falling out.

The Accu-Melt which I think is an Italian unit uses tongs that pull
the melting crucible out to pour.

I have both and prefer the Kerr unit.

Best regards,
Todd Hawkinson
www.southeastmn.edu/jewelry


#7

I was warned by Rio that pulling out the carbon crucible is a big
no-no because it creates thermal shock for the crucible each time you
take it out and put it back in, plus your metal cools much faster.
They are designed to pour like a coffee carafe for many good reasons.
If I think my crucible is going to slip out because I have to tip it
way over, then I use a carbon rod or my tongs to hold it in place. I
do agree that it is a royal pain to have it slip out, plus it is a
royal pain to have the crucible rotate in the thermos so that the
spout isn’t where you expect it to be. I am about to cast another
batch of flowers and leaves, so wish me luck!

Thanks!
Carina Rossner
carinarossner.com


#8
...pulling out the carbon crucible is a big no-no because it
creates thermal shock... 

This is true, and speaking of shocks, what can happen is you’ll get
cracks in the crucible and molten metal will squeeze through the
crack and come into contact with the heating elements. Your carbon
(graphite) rod is conductive and if you’re lucky enough to live
outside the US, your ElectroMelt runs on 220v.

Paf


#9
I was warned by Rio that pulling out the carbon crucible is a big
no-no because it creates thermal shock for the crucible each time
you take it out and put it back in, plus your metal cools much
faster. They are designed to pour like a coffee carafe for many
good reasons. 

The clip’s sounding like a good idea.

Oh and picture of the flowers would be nice :slight_smile:

Regards Charles A.

[Edit]

How can I share files and pictures with the list?
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ftp

Or… send the files to the attention of service@ganoksin.com and
we will upload them for you…

[/Edit]


#10

Thanks everyone for all the help with the electromelt I inherited. I
had to laugh at the video as her set up was almost identical to mine
since I got the thermal carafe. The only difference was her kiln was
a little bigger. Anyway, with all the help from everyone I should be
using my electromelt with no problems now.


#11

it should also be noted that when using a electric melt, you should
add 75-100 degrees F to your recommended melting temperature if you
are using the built in temp monitor.

United has some more info:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/17w

Thanks
Christisn


#12
Thanks everyone for all the help with the electromelt I inherited.
I had to laugh at the video as her set up was almost identical to
mine since I got the thermal carafe. 

I’m damned impressed with how she poured out exactly 100 grams of
casting grain into that little cup!


#13
I'm damned impressed with how she poured out exactly 100 grams of
casting grain into that little cup! 

Ah, the magic of video editing! :slight_smile: (It was premeasured… :wink: )

Kathy
featheredgems.com


#14
This is true, and speaking of shocks, what can happen is you'll
get cracks in the crucible and molten metal will squeeze through
the crack and come into contact with the heating elements. Your
carbon (graphite) rod is conductive and if you're lucky enough to
live outside the US, your ElectroMelt runs on 220v. 

Don’t know about electro melt crucibles, but a standard bilge type
clay graphite crucible will not crack if it has been tempered
properly.

They can crack, and I had one explode, when they are not tempered
properly.

Regards Charles A.


#15
Thanks everyone for all the help with the electromelt I inherited.
I had to laugh at the video as her set up was almost identical to
mine since I got the thermal carafe. The only difference was her
kiln was a little bigger. Anyway, with all the help from everyone I
should be using my electromelt with no problems now. 

That video is mine, and that’s me. :slight_smile: The tongs are the way to go
when pouring from an Electromelt. We learned that trick from the lady
whose casting shop we bought when she retired. And I LOVE my kiln!
When my old Kerr 666 (which only held 4 flasks) died in the middle of
a huge, important job I had to replace it immediately. I bought the
biggest kiln I could find. It holds 16 2.5" flasks and if they’re
short enough I can stack a second layer on top, up to 25 flasks.

Kathy Johnson
featheredgems.com


#16

Hi Carina,

Rio Is correct, It is safest to keep the Crucible in the electromelt
no matter what you have to do to make that happen. You should be able
make a Thin stainless L shaped strap that can be screwed down near
the hinge that can be turned into place to hold the crucible in place
and stop it from moving.

If you remove the crucible and it cracks or breaks while it is out
in the open, the metal might get on you or your shoes and cause
serious damage to you and other equipment. This has happened to some
people years ago. Don’t let it happen to you ! Safety first.

Daniel Grandi
Racecar Jewelry Co. Inc.