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Double reflection in photos


#1

Taking digital photos on glass (or plexi) with a sheet of gradient
paper taped to the bottom side always gives me a double reflection
of the object I am photographing. I think the top surface of the
glass is creating one reflection and then light bouncing back from
the bottom surface gives a second reflection shadowing the first. I
like the look of a reflection in a jewelry photo but do not like
seeing double!

I have read all the articles, books, Orchid archive, etc., on taking
photos of jewelry and have never seen this mentioned. I have tried
all kinds of different lighting solutions and angles for the camera
placement but still get the double reflection. I am tired of using
Photoshop to take out the second reflection on every photo. Any
suggestions will be welcome!

Cynthia Clearwater
www.touchstonejewelrydesign.com


#2

Cynthia,

Try using non-glare glass and also try elevating the glass a few
inches above the gradient paper. The non glare glass will eliminate
the reflections and elevating the glass above the paper will give a
feeling of more depth to the photo.

l Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com


#3
I think the top surface of the glass is creating one reflection and
then light bouncing back from the bottom surface gives a second
reflection shadowing the first. I like the look of a reflection in
a jewelry photo but do not like seeing double! 

The first thing I would do, if you like the single reflection, try
and find some glass that has been etched/frosted on one side.

You can DIY this with some window adhesive film. Another option,
Krylon makes a spray that does the same thing (Frosted Glass Finish).
Hobby/Art stores are going to be your best bet for the latter, it
will make one side translucent. Looking at your photos (quite nice
btw) this might work out well for you.

If your feeling frisky, try using a polarizing filter in front of
your lense, it will probably elminate both reflections. Here is how
the filter works.

http://www.great-landscape-photography.com/polarizing-filter.html

Lastly, try and find some anit-glare (non-reflective) glass. Almost
any glass shop should have this stuff. If not, most framing shops
carry something similar…once again this might elminate all
relfections.

Good Luck,
P@
www.patpruitt.com


#4
Taking digital photos on glass (or plexi) with a sheet of gradient
paper taped to the bottom side always gives me a double reflection
of the object I am photographing. 

My photographer shoots everything on plexi, and my slides don’t have
a double reflection… The only obvious difference is that, rather
than a gradient taped to the back, he uses a drape of black that
hangs well below the plexi. The gradient effect comes from reflected
light on the plexi, carefully arranged.

The downside to this set up is it takes a lot of room, and really
needs one light directly over the object as well as lights on the
sides.

You can get a single reflection, but not a gradient, from shooting
on opaque black plexi.

HTH
Noel


#5

Hi Cynthia,

Use non-reflective glass, available at any frame, mirror or glass
shop. This will allow only one subtle reflection of the subject. For
different colored backgrounds, you can paint the polished side of
the glass in the chosen color, which makes a durable and consistent
colored background.

You can also place the unpainted non-glare glass on any chosen
colored paper or cloth for different effect or you can elevate the
clear glass on bricks (8-10 inches works well for me with gemstones)
and then place a sheet of colored paper under the glass, at a slant,
to create a gradient. It is possible (and wise) to light this lower
background separately.

Patterned paper, or holiday wrapping paper or even large newsprint
can be used to good advantage with a setup like this, as the images
are way out of focus and provide interesting patches of color. As
you stop the lens down, the images become more discernable, so you
can play with this forever.

If you have the equipment and photo knowledge to create a small
spotlight effect, do so by shooting the piece with your light
(snoot) behind and above the object at a 20-35 degree angle. With
the subject thus backlit, on a piece of non-glare glass that has
been painted on the bottom side you will get a very nice reflection
and a nice oval shaped fall-off of light. The main lighting is
provided by two whte reflectors placed to either side of the camera
lens; they bounce light back onto the subject. Makes a very, very
nice image.

Good luck, if you have problems, contact me…

Wayne Emery
The Gemcutter


#6

Just got this off of the ArtMetal site and thought of this list and
in particular this question.

How to make a very simple but effective light box and some sample
pictures taken with the box.

John Dach