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Disposing of Pickle


#1

I had some very very very very used sparex pickle (the stuff for
nonferrous). It is so used that there are funky clear crystals
in the bottom of the crock pot. Two questions–how do I dispose
of this stuff safely and without poisoning any little squirrels?
And what the hell are those crystal in the bottom??? Is the
solution just oversaturated, not enough water to dissolve all of
the sparex?? I have use this pickle only with silver. OH–the
crystals are colorless and the solution is murky.

Marshall T. Jones
@Marshall_Jones


#2

Is the Pickle Color Blue, or clear/white? The Same for the
crystals?


#3

I had some very very very very used sparex pickle (the stuff for
nonferrous). It is so used that there are funky clear crystals
in the bottom of the crock pot. Two questions–how do I dispose
of this stuff safely and without poisoning any little squirrels?
And what the hell are those crystal in the bottom??? Is the
solution just oversaturated, not enough water to dissolve all of
the sparex?? I have use this pickle only with silver. OH–the
crystals are colorless and the solution is murky.

I add baking soda to the pickle to neutralize it then let the
solution dry out in a container. I then throw it into the waste
barrel that I send to my refiner for recovery. Contact a
refinery for a

Rick Hamilton


#4

MJ> I had some very very very very used sparex pickle (the stuff for
MJ> nonferrous). Two questions–how do I dispose
MJ> of this stuff safely and without poisoning any little squirrels?

MJ> And what the hell are those crystal in the bottom???

MJ> Marshall T. Jones
MJ> celt@perigee.net

G’day Marshall; suspect that the crystals are those of Sodium
sulphate/sodium bisulphate and other somewhat strange chemicals
plus some copper sulphate

Sparex is so damn cheap especially if you buy it as toilet
cleaner (called Harpic in NZ: “Cleans Round The Bend,” and why
nutty people are very often referred to as being ‘Harpic’) You
don’t really need to let it evaporate to and beyond saturation
point. Just dilute it really well and pour it - you guessed -
down the toilet! But I’m not all that environmentally safe either. –

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, =
      / /
     / //\    johnb@ts.co.nz
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#5

I had some very very very very used sparex pickle (the stuff for
nonferrous). It is so used that there are funky clear crystals
in the bottom of the crock pot. Two questions–how do I dispose
of this stuff safely and without poisoning any little squirrels?
And what the hell are those crystal in the bottom??? Is the
solution just oversaturated, not enough water to dissolve all of
the sparex?? I have use this pickle only with silver. OH–the
crystals are colorless and the solution is murky.Marshall T. Jones

Sparex is sodium bisulfate (this is not the chemical used for
sterilizing beer and wine-that is sodium metabisulfate). It is
the main ingredient in industrial toilet bowl cleaners (and home
ones like Vanish). (does that say something about safe
disposal?-not sure, the pickle residue is probably contaminated
with copper sulfate crystals which can kill waterlife). It is
also used as an acid neutralizer for swimming pools. I’ve been
in a hot tub and had someone test the water, then start ladling
sparex into the tub. Even though I know it was fine I still got
out. The same chemical is used to pickle steels with in
industrial situations.

In Canada any fire station is legally obligated to take small
quantities of toxic materials from individuals (not corporate
dumping). and once a year they have a toxic materials gathering
that is free. Perhaps where you live there is also such an
ingathering of toxic stuff.

Perhaps our resident chemist, John Burgess will have some good comments for us.

Charles

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7, Canada
Tel: 403-263-3955 Fax: 403-283-9053 Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain

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#6

Marshal: I dump it down the drain after its been "Deacidified"
with Baking soda. ( hey crystal drano, Sparex,? what’s the
difference? ) But to be politically correct you’d better check
your states regulation’s regarding chemical disposals.

Timinator


#7

… into the waste barrel that I send to my refiner for recovery…

I have only recently begun collecting for refining and I am
wondering if you have any suggestions on items that I haven’t
thought of. The obvious ones I’m stashing are: drawer sweeps,
used sandpaper and used buffs. I hadn’t thought of the pickle.
What else am I missing? Is it worth vacuuming the area and
including the bag? I was also wondering where one can obtain a
55 gal. drum?

Sharon


#8

In the first place, why not use washing soda (sodium carbonate)
to neutralize? It is much cheaper and has a higher capacity to
neutralize acids. Washing down the drain depends on where the
drain leads to. If you have on-site disposal to a septic tank it
is not a good idea to put anything toxic into the ground water.
Even use drain cleaning chemicals with care and NEVER use organic
solvents to clean the drains. If it is only a fairly small
quantity and goes to a big city sewer system, no harm can result.

TOM (OWL1)


#9

Sharon,
I’ve worked for some REAL tightwads in my career. Here are a few more
refining tips:

  1. when changing the ultrasonic, drain the solution through a paper towel
    and wipe the tank with another. Put both towels in w/ refinery scraps.

  2. get a shop-vac or small garage sale type vacuum for the sole purpose
    of vacuuming out inside and around the buffing machine. Put bag in w/
    refinery scraps

3)Wear a cheap butchers type smock and send it in to be refined instead
of washing it.

We get a large drum from our refinery, Hoover & Strong in
Richmond, VA. Pretty much all waste that has a possibility of
having come in contact with precious metal in our shop goes in
that drum.

                      Wendy Newman  at @Wendy_Newman

#10

In a message dated 97-01-22 06:20:51 EST, you write:

<< 2) get a shop-vac or small garage sale type vacuum for
the sole purpose of vacuuming out inside and around the buffing
machine. Put bag in w/ refinery scraps >>

To take this a step further, see if you can find a "Rainbow"
vacuum at a flea market or garage sale their much too expensive
for shop purposes to buy new). The filtration system is a water
filled canister and everything is pulled through the water with
the heavy stuff settling to the bottom. It’s really handy for
finding small stones or findings. Anyway after vacuuming, just
poor off the water through a filter paper as mentioned earlier.

Larry Hammons