Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Different Little Torch problem


#1

I’m having a different little torch problem. I cannot get the flame
up high enough to do heavy rings without putting the torch out. Not
talking about trying to do something like a heavy silver bracelet,
just a gold men’s class ring for instance. Heat just won’t crank
high enough… it either goes out with a pfft when just big enough
for a wedding set or the flame goes out away from the torch and
disappears as though I have too much propane and not enough oxygen.
I’ve already changed the propane bottle thinking that perhaps it was
to low to maintain pressure. Using hardware store propane bottles
and Oxy with guage. Guage reading is normal. No leaks detected.

Thanks for any suggestions,
Jay


#2

Since the regulator for the disposable gas bottle is factory set for
5 PSI, first make sure your Oxy gauge is set for the same. If so,
also make sure you’re using the largest (#7) tip.


#3

Jay, You didn’t say what size tip you are using on your Little
Torch. Perhaps it is not big enough for the job that you are
attempting. On something like a gold men’s class ring I would usually
use the #4 tip with 8-9 psi oxygen and 6 psi acetylene.

Joel Schwalb
@Joel_Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com


#4

Hi Jay,

My first inclination would be to change to a larger tip. I have had
the same thing occur when I get a little too ambitious with the gas.
You’re basically overpowering the tip orifice and blowing the flame
out. If you’re already using the largest tip (#6 I believe) then you
probably need to use a larger torch.

Best,

Mike Dibble
Black Horse Design
www.black-horse-design.com


#5

Jay, I’d recommend using a larger tip. A #5 should do it, if not then
a #6 surely will.

Jerry in Kodiak


#6

Hi Jay,

You need a larger tip to allow more gas to flow. The tips can be
changed for varying flame sizes and working preferences. (I use
acetelyne with a #4 tip almost exclusively.)

I don’t know which would be best for you but I think you will need
at least a #6 tip to push any heat from the little torch when using
propane. If you look at the base of the tip there is a number stamped
on the copper part just above the screw. Try using a larger tip number
for the heavier jobs.

I’ve read others posts about line pressure for the fuel and oxygen.
Anywhere between 6 & 10psi should drive the little torch well. I do
not suggest using higher line pressures than that.

Mark


#7

Hi Jay, what kind of gas do you use? Propane just won’t get hot
enough to do the job if you are using water to keep the stones cool.
I use acetylene. I set the gas at 5psi, and the Oxygen at 10psi. I
use a large tip for this kind of job. A #6 or 7. (You didn’t mention
the size tip you use), I have even used a multi orifice tip on
occasion. (Normally used to cast small casts with). If you don’t
have the larger tips you can get them from Rio Grande or Pearson
Jewelry supply, or Progress.

I hope this helps you.
Randy.


#8

The problem of getting sufficient heat to a joint in a heavy object
using a little torch is exacerbated by virtue of the lower potential
temperature using propane or natural gas and oxygen. Acetylene is
far hotter than other gases.

You can mitigate the above problem by using a larger tip and you may
even have to go to a melting tip ( rosebud ) Any way you look at it,
all systems have their limits and you must learn what those limits
are through experience.

Ron MIlls @ Mills Gem Co., Los Osos, Ca.


#9

Thanks for all your suggestions. Apparnetly I’ve been using this
torch for so many years that the tip had built up quite a bit of
carbon around the inner orafice. I broke a sawblade and cleaned it
out, cleaning the outside with sandpaper. It worked!


#10

Jay,

Perhaps your tip is clogged. Take a look at the end of the tip and
see if there is a build-up of some sort clogging the end. You might
also remove the tip and run it in the ultrasonic for awhile. When
mine starts acting up, this usually takes care of it.

James s. Cantrell cMBJ


#11

Check your tip size. The number is stamped on the back. You’re
probably using a 4 or 5 and may need a 6 or 7 size.

-Stanley Bright
Owner
A&M Jewelers
Baltimore, MD