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Design software for a beginner


#1

Saying that I’m a novice to jewelry making to me is an
understatement. One issue that I am having is finding design software
that has a platform I can understand. I like the idea of
CounterSketch Studio because I can take a basic ring design and make
the changes I want to it. The downside to this software is that I
would have to use an outside source to manufacture my designs. I also
am having a bit of an issue with finding a CNC setup that fits my
needs. I have looked into bench tops like the Sherline 5400 and the
stonehog lapidary workshop and a couple of othersbut have not made a
final decision yet. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.


#2
Saying that I'm a novice to jewelry making to me is an
understatement. One issue that I am having is finding design
software that has a platform I can understand. 

As a geezer who has been making jewelry for around 35 years, I’d say
that you’re going about it bass akwards. Get a sketch pad and a
pencil. Maybe some wax.

Paf Dvorak


#3

If you are looking at a simple software package for designing
jewelry that is on the less expensive side I would vote for
Rhinoceros.

It is not jewelry specific but is a curve and surfacing tool which
can be downloaded for free on a trial basis. You get 25 saves for
free with it and it functions for 90 days I believe. The other
options are several different jewelry specific software applications.
Matrix, RhinoGold, 3Design, JewelCAD, and many more.

These packages cost a lot more. The Matrix program we have for 245
domestic or 345 international for 6 months if you are a full time
student with us. You can do your training online 24/7 at your own
pace. We instruct Matrix, Rhino, and RhinoGold in this fashion. It
sounds like you need to do some more research in your choices but
once you make that decision stay with it. There is no sense in
learning 3 or 4 pieces of software to do the same thing.

Good luck!
Russ Hyder
The Jewelry CAD Institute


#4
As a geezer who has been making jewelry for around 35 years, I'd
say that you're going about it bass akwards. Get a sketch pad and a
pencil. Maybe some wax. 

Guess I’m backwards too :smiley:

I learned to make things by hand first, then I learned to draw those
3D objects with a computer, then I learned to draw by hand.

Now I can do it the other way :slight_smile:

Starting with wax and paper is the cheaper route :wink:

Regards Charles A.


#5

If I were going to choose, (and I may soon) I have been considering
using Google Sketch-up (Google it and try a trial) for software, as
they have tutorials online and I completed enough of them to know I
could learn it easily. Furthermore, I learned that the files can be
exported in numerous formats.

For production, I have been looking at the MakerBot 3D Printer for
around $2000. It uses “additive” instead of “reductive” technology to
"print" the parts one designs. The last I looked, they were printing
using PVC plastic (weedeater line) to “print” with and someone had
been developing a frosting printer for “printing” Sketchup created
cake decorations.

Burning out ABS was concerning me but I am certain that I could
evacuate a plaster mold where frosting was used for the model!!!

Happy shopping!!
Keith (aka MadJeweler)