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Dental microscope for gemstone examination


#1

BTW, my dentist and I were discussing jewelry and gemstones and I
mentioned setting up the space here and a few other things and we
got on the subject of microscopes, her has one he’d would like to get
rid of but I wasnt sure if I could correctly use it for gemstone
examination, we aren’t sure if his particular microscope is properly
made or lit for my needs but he told me if ya’ll said that it was ok
( because I said i had to ask the experts), he would give me a good
deal on it, of $300, it’s a medical mocroscope, so it not to shabby.


#2

Unless the microscope has a lot of extra lenses, etc. it would not be
suitable for studying gems. The focal length is much too short. You
can buy a suitable scope for half that price new. MD


#3

I don’t know much at all about studying gemstones under microscopes,
but If it’s the sort of microscope that’s used for dental surgery, it
could possibly make a fantastic scope for stonesetting and engraving.
Doctors have to worry about having a working distance far enough to
have their hands and tools under the scope too.

I think you’ll need to post more about this particular
scope to get any real help though. Zoom, working distance, make,
model, etc.

If it isn’t lit properly there are plenty of websites selling extra
light sources. What sort of stand is it on? I’d expect that would be
the deal breaker if there was one, at least if it’s the sort of
monstrosity hanging from my dentist’s ceiling. Even still, stands
can be bought separately too, and $300 sounds like a fantastic price
for medical-quality optics.

Willis Hance


#4

I would appreciate any sources for this, because i looked at one
that was closer to $600 and after buying a refractoscope and some
other equipment my husband put his foot down


#5
I would appreciate any sources for this, because i looked at one
that was closer to $600 and after buying a refractoscope and some
other equipment my husband put his foot down 

I guess it would be appropriate to warn anybody who wants to buy
microscope suitable for gemological studies. The most important
requirements for gemological microscope is not degree of
magnification, but the ability to stage different lighting
conditions. So before buying a microscope, familiarize yourself with
gemological microscope requirements.

The quickest and the most efficient way to learn techniques of
gemological examination is to enroll in one of the courses offered
by GIA. I have been critical of certain aspect of GIA education, but
as far as taking an absolute beginner to the level of relative
proficiency, they are the best. So save yourself time and money and
do it the right way.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#6

I purchased a Gemoro Duo-view super dark field loupe to use when
"out" somewhere instead of the microscope. I also have a scope. I
love this tool, its very portable and not expensive. I saw it on
Kingsley North for about $89.00. The side loupe is 20x magnification
and top is 10x magnification. I think this is a good tool for
someone just starting out with gem id or if you just want to really
see inside a customers stone.

Mary
Namaste


#7

Microscopes in the stores were first meant for grading stones in and
out, relating to repairs… Because they offer the third hand for
inspection purposes then they were naturally employed for Quality
Control. Resources-processes-values. Core compentencies reside in
processes and values, because they are embeded in your companys
culture. So process standards and resource allocation to meet those
standards has to be worked out. You need to have the crucial
conversation with the office manager in regards to magnification
standards during Quality Control. Bring with you a new #8 - 2.5x
optivisor $28.00. and suggest that possibly when the time is
right,you will get a microscope and the two of you can raise the
standard bar together.

good luck.


#8

Debra - I’m not sure why you are looking at a dental microscope. The
dental industry uses a lot of jewelry type tools - for example
abrasive discs- and because the supplier is to dentists, the
materials seem to be quite a bit more than what we pay as jewelers.

Charles Lewton Brain has written a good article on gemology
microscopes that is in the Orchid archives - here is the link -

While Charles is a creative and resourceful person and can make
pretty much anything work, as you start down the path of gemstone
id, my advice is to buy something that will work conveniently out of
the box. You have a lot of learning to do and don’t need to build or
modify an instrument before you discover what you need it to do.

When I had to purchase a microscope for my gemology studies, I
bought the least expensive one that GIA supplied. It was a lot more
than $600. Being a lot older and wiser, and with the web search
available now, I would search for gemstone microscope. Here is one
that turned up on that search that would probably do what you need.
The listed price is US$282 with free shipping. I don’t know this
device or the seller,

http://tinyurl.com/ygkmfs2

I doubt the optics are wonderful. It has the basics you need
however. 10 and 30 power, adjustable interpupilary dimension along
with the very necessary darkfield illumination option. It lacks
overhead illumination. I much prefer a zoom option, but you really
can get by with the fixed 10-30 option.

I am familiar with the GemOro microscope however. It too is very
basic. The optics are acceptable and the device is set up for gem
identification. I found one on www.findingking.com for $398. I don’t
know anything about findingking.com. I have used this model of GemOro
microscope and it works.

While I appreciate your husbands concern on costs, I encourage you
to buy something designed for the job at hand. More than 20 years
ago, when I got set up with instruments for my GG, they cost nearly
$3000. The lessons were a lot more. I still wish I had bought a nicer
microscope, but my original one works and I’m not going to replace it
any time soon. Whatever you purchase now, you will have for the
duration.

Judy Hoch, GG


#9
I am familiar with the GemOro microscope however. It too is very
basic. The optics are acceptable and the device is set up for gem
identification. I found one on findingking.com for $398. I don't
know anything about findingking.com. I have used this model of
GemOro microscope and it works. 

I have heard a lot of bad press about that company and backorder
problems if the merchandise is not in stock at the time you order.
Also quality issues have been another theme of discontent as all?
their stuff is of Chinese origin and it seems to reflect cheap rather
than quality. If anyone has a different point of view, please speak
up.