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Delft casting models


#1

hi, all- what would you recommend to make models of for delft
casting? I think I’m going to buy myself the Delft kit for
Christmas, and I’d like to be getting started on models.So what does
one use? Carving wax? Fimo? Hydro perm? thanks in advance-

Anne Stickney


#2
 So what does one use?  Carving wax?  Fimo?  Hydro perm?  thanks in
advance- 

Whatever will work best for your situation. It depends too, on the
type of model and how detailed it has to be. I most often use the
Delft clay for things like quickly casting up a blank from which to
make a ring shank or other variable thickness part. Saves on filing
and forging on a gold piece. For such simple stuff, carving wax is
quick and easy. for more precise or long lived permanent) models
that I’ll want to use again, I sometimes will make it in brass. A
couple of commonly needed shapes started as one shot wax models, and
realizing that I’d want to use it again, and that my wax had been a
bit too quick, I cast another from that wax in brass, and refined it.
but you can use almost anything that’s reasonably solid and firm and
can take a bit of pressure from ramming the sand into the frame.
Wood is another traditional sand casting model material that works
well.

Peter


#3

Packing the clay in a Delft ring set requires a fair amount of
force. As such, I tend to use either metal masters, or uncomplicated
carved plastic ones. Wax would not hold up to the forces required to
adequately pack the mould and still get a decent finish on the item.
As for a method of replicating items, Delft is a novelty at best.
It’s biggest benefit is that it can take higher temp metals than RTV
systems can, but the setup time for each attempt can really add up if
you plan on making a run of very many pieces.

Generally, my metal masters that I use for Delft casting I create w/
wax masters and an RTV system. Flat pieces like pendants can usually
be carved directly out of plastic and hold up well enough if the
piece isn’t too large. I use the Delft system because it’s very
similar to sandcasting methods used in the late Medieval periods,
which
I study as a hobby.


#4

Here’s a list for starters.
hard carving wax shapes
plexiglass (acrylic)
metal shapes, like silver rings
plastic doll’s parts
steel nuts and bolts and screws
some coins (strong designs work)
wood
twigs
nuts
kernels

Basically the material must withstand compressive force.

I teach Delft at High School level as well as to 9 year-olds, and to
real jewellers.

Cheers
Brian
B r i a n A d a m a n d R u t h B a i r d
518 South Titirangi Road Auckland NEW ZEALAND
ph/fx +64 9 817 6816
www.adam.co.nz
www.fingers.co.nz


#5
    hi, all- what would you recommend to make models of for delft
casting? I think I'm going to buy myself the Delft kit for
Christmas, and I'd like to be getting started on models.So what
does one use?  Carving wax?  Fimo?  Hydro perm?  thanks in advance- 

Hard carving wax works well, like Ferris green. Fired Fimo and
Sculpey work well. Models need to be smooth with a low cohesion
factor. Think glassy, waxy, hard, smooth, metallic, plasticized–not
sticky, grainy, rough, porous. Another excellent use for Jett-Sett.


#6

As others have said if you have the patience any object of
reasonable density that isn’t to fragile. A student of mine cast a
small plastic model of a standing cow creating piece mold sections,
separated with talc. This figure was about 1.5 cm high.

I have found it very useful as a small open ingot mold when melting
down small amounts of fine metals, the carbon appears to reduce
oxides in the surface and is easy to make the size and shape that
suits the end use. David