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Cuttlebone for casting


#1

wanting to do the cuttlebone or any primitive method for casting a
batch of somewhat identical shapes…can’t seem to find out if this
method is reuseable…the cuttlebone I mean or is there another
lowtech (meaning I have no kiln) way of casting small pieces?


#2

I’ve got my own sling caster. And even though I have centrifugal
machine,I still use it just for fun. Marco


#3

Have you looked into use the Delft sand casting system? This may be
a more economical way to go as cuttlebone can get costly if you are
needing to do many pieces. I don’t believe that cuttlebone is
reusable. Laney


#4

There is sand casting…and clay casting…John Burgess can you
help here?..by the way, your apples from New Zealand were simply
delicious…just like the ones from my Gran’s orchard in
Peterborough…Susan Chastain


#5

Hi All Cuttlefish bone does not take to been used twice for high
melting point metals ,for tin or lead alloys it is fine.Try casting
sand the type used in a brass foundary .There is a kit on the market
that is sold under the name of Delf Clay casting method,this is very
expensive for what it is approx $70in England .You get about 2kilo of
sand and a mould frame.The sand costs $30per 50 kilo ( trade name
Petrobond here in England) a casting box can be made up out of 12mm
ply.

Regards David Sheard


#6

I tried cuttlebone once and couldn’t get very excited about it. But
with very simple shapes it will make repeated castings. How many I
don’t know. Going beyond that you can make two piece investment molds,
in shallow tin can rings or “cope and drag” frames.

If your shape can have a fairly rough textured you may consider sand
casting from a pattern that lets you make duplicate sand molds.

I recall from somewhere that you can make a tiny but useful electric
kiln with a hotplate - the old ceramic kind - and an inverted flower
pot. I haven’t tried it, but it ought to work. Alan Heugh


#7
   wanting to do the cuttlebone or any primitive method for casting
a batch of somewhat identical shapes...can't seem to find out if
this method is reuseable..the cuttlebone I mean or is there another
lowtech (meaning I have no kiln) way of casting small pieces? 

I like cuttlebone casting, but I have never gotten more than one
piece from a mold. Supposedly the use of powdered graphite will allow
you to get 2 but I always just made a rubber mold later. Sand casting
does a lot better and is low tech enough for you. Tufa casting is
another.

Michael Hayman

Handcrafted Celtic and Medieval Jewelry
in Sterling and Gold
http://haymancelticjewelry.com


#8

I have read that with care 2 to 4 castings of decreasing quality are
possible with cuttlebone, although, I’ve yet to try it. I have done
a couple of sand casting, Rio and other offer the pre-mixed sand or
entire kits.Once a model has been made copies can with care be made
readily. I’m not sure of the profitability of the process, but the
sand is reusable and the process does not require a kiln and anything
else short of a torch sufficient for the amount of metal needed for
casting. Some propane/MAPP torches are enough for 25 to 30 dwt. of
silver. Tim McCreight,s “Practical Castings”, has more on this and
other low tech / low cost casting methods.

Hope this helps, Happy castings, Ed


#9
wanting to do the cuttlebone or any primitive method for casting a
batch of somewhat identical shapes...can't seem to find out if this
method is reuseable..the cuttlebone I mean or is there another
lowtech (meaning I have no kiln) way of casting small pieces?

Lisa, Cuttlebone casting is not a reusable method - it usually burns
out the cuttlebone in one use. Rio sells the Delft Clay Casting Kit
(pg 108 in the Tools catalog - $75 for the basic kit) that uses a
reusable casting clay in a 2-piece metal ring. It will not let you
cast an undercut item and spruing is a bit trickier, but it is
low-tech and mainly for small pieces. There is even a video
available!

Jim Marotti
Lancaster, TN


#10

Hi Lisa,

   wanting to do the cuttlebone or any primitive method for casting
a batch of somewhat identical shapes...can't seem to find out if
this method is reuseable..the cuttlebone I mean or is there another
lowtech (meaning I have no kiln) way of casting small pieces?

You might want to check out Delft Clay casting. It’s a form of sand
casting except that the 'sand ’ is an extremely fine material mixed
with the appropriate binders. After pouring a mold, a large part of
the material can be reused. The only material that is scrapped is that
directly in contact with the molten metal.

Delft clay casting requires a new mold for every piece. The model
should be something sturdy that can take the wear & tear of repeated
molding.

Rio Grande has a complete kit as well as a video on the process.

Dave


#11

Lisa,

Cuttle bone give you a piece with a very interesting texture, but you
are right cuttle bone is a one time deal. The soft bone burns when
molten metals is cast into it, and lets off that horrible smell like
burning hair. If you’d like to do low relief casting I have found
that “pucks” of investment do the job. Make sure the two pieces are
flush, carve out the design you’d like, including a sprew. Use a
clamp to hold the pieces together, set it in a box of sand to keep
the peice standing up right. Heat your metal, until it is in liquid
form, keep heating as you poor it in the sprew. Wait for the button
to turn black and then you can take the clamp off. You will then have
cast item, one side will be flat the other will be raised. I have
found that pewter works very well.

Good Luck

Amanda


#12

Dear lisa

Don’t reveal this secret to nobody (except to orchid members) but if
you are interested in casting small pieces, you can start with what I
call the(dentist secret ) parting from the fact,that a lady (dentist
friend of mine) revealed to me. First, you have to buy a sling
caster,a device that looks like a handle with piece of chain and a
small basket in the other end to hold the flask in wich you melt your
metal to be cast by centrifugal force. instead of a kiln you can burn
your wax out and even plastic with a simple torch In a matter o
minutes. I know this article is going to cause controvercy. But
believe me. I have done many castings by this metod . And let me tell
you something, In this moment in many parts of the world dentists are
casting crowns this way. I wish this help you.

sometimes my 8 year old ask me to burn his small plastic toys in
order to cast’em in silver.

Marco


#13

Can you pour the molten metal directly into the Delft Clay?
Cuttlebone? Other? or use it only to make a wax model?


#14

What are you casting? Pewter goes nicely into rubber molds, silver
goes into soapstone well. Ive gotten 2 casts from cuttlefish, but the
second is uglier than the first. Sand is better but not much… karen


#15

Hi, I’ve used cuttlebone casting a little, and have been able to get
a couple of repeats from a mould, and the moulds seem perfectly fine
still, but I’ve not tried more than a couple of any cuttlebone mould.
If you can’t get as many as you want, why not try impressing one of
your completed casts into a new cuttlebone? goodluck, Christine


#16
Can you pour the molten metal directly into the Delft Clay?
Cuttlebone?  Other?  or use it only to make a wax model?<< 

The molten metal is poured directly into the Delft Clay or cuttlebone
mold.


#17

G’day; you rang Modom? Sorry, Susan, you got the wrong bloke. I
don’t do any casting! All my stuff is laboriously fabricated. Phew. I
think the bloke to ask about Delft Clay casting is Brian Adam who’s a
member of Orchid

	brian@adam.co.nz 	

who lives in Auckland, but can sometimes be almost anywhere. NZ apples
really ARE delicious, Golden Delicious, Fuji, Pacific Rose, Splendour,
Braemar, Jonathon, Gala, Royal Gala, Granny Smith…etc Although we
only get the ones they consider not quite fit for export, they are
still delicious just the same. Only probably a bit cheaper here in
Nelson, where we are surrounded by orchards and other fruit gardens; a
five kilo bag of Royal Gala sells for NZ$2.50 (halve that for $US) at
the orchard gate even now, and it’s spring here, and they are just as
nice from the cool store as when freshly picked - and envy is a sin.
Cheers and good eating, – John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua
Nelson NZ –


#18

Some months ago Sara Sanford had detailed instructions for
cuttlebone casting. in Lapidary Journal. Check it out and follow to
the letter. She is very knowledgeable and you can rely on her
guidance for perfect cuttlebone casting every time. I believe the article was in two parts.

  • Alma