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Cutting diamond cubes


#1

Question from “not a gem cutter” is it possible to cut my little
diamond cubes in half with a tiny diamond saw blade using my Fordam
tool? I have imagined this so many times - but is it even possible?
My diamonds are wee little ones - about 3.5 x 3.5 mm and they are a
little too deep for my design - I would also like to double my
stones by slicing them in two! Thanks to all!

Robyn


#2
Question from "not a gem cutter" is it possible to cut my little
diamond cubes in half with a tiny diamond saw blade using my
Fordam tool? I have imagined this so many times - but is it even
possible? 

I would like to ask “how do you know that what you have are
diamonds?”

Assuming that they are, my answer would be, - it depends. You would
have to determine which direction of cube is the softest. It is the
only direction that makes cutting possible. But for that you have to
either a gemologist or a diamond cutter.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#3
I was looking at diamond cube inlay today in an incredible ring. 

It is possible to trim a 3.mm cube. Holding onto it’s another matter.
Superglue with instant kicker will hold it on the dop. A powder
actuated concrete nail is strong/a flat surface. You can find them
at any of the hardware marts.

Splitting them- not likely to get but one side at this size. Using a
high power Optivisor. On your foredom. Getting a true straight edge
will be challenging. Not insurmountable…trimming is your best
bet without setting up a jig/square surfaces all around, sliding up
to a fixed blade/wheel.

Anxious to see what other folks have to say about cutting tiny
stones. I was asked to teach a lady how to make 3mm cubes for
earrings once- which was a challenge.~

James


#4
Question from "not a gem cutter" is it possible to cut my little
diamond cubes in half with a tiny diamond saw blade using my
Fordam tool? 

In a word, no, not with the tools you have. Diamonds can be sawn
along directions parallel to the cubic faces, so actually cutting
your cubes in half is possible. But you need a good deal more robust
saw than anything that fits your fordom. A typical diamond saw is
several inches in diameter, traditionally made of thin copper sheet
with diamonds imbedded in the edge. These are run at high speeds,
with coolant, into carefully clamped and held stones, and cutting
even fairly small stones in half is an operation measured in hours,
not minutes.

Your best bet would be to see if there is a diamond cutter located
somewhere near you, who could do this for you.

HTH
Peter Rowe