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Cuti-pi or Bonny Doons new saw?

I loved trying out Bonny Doon’s new concept saw at Rio’s Catalog in
Motion. Although it is out of my price range.

Can anyone who tried it at the show who is also familiar with the
Cuti Pi metal saw have any comments on the differences or
similarities? Can the Cuti Pi cut steel? Is it variable speed? Any
other comments?

Thanks,
Margaret

Can the Cuti Pi cut steel? Is it variable speed? Any other
comments? 

I have a Cuti Pi and I mostly use it for cutting silver. It is
variable speed. I got the the tilt table adaptor to try to cut steel
pancake dies. I found I could do it faster by hand; you wear out and
break the saw blades too quickly.

Having been to Lee Marshall’s and spent time testing the prototype
of his new saw… I can only say that I immediately ordered the
first one he produces!

In 35 years of metalsmithing I have seen a lot of "power assisted"
sawing devices. None of them were accurate enough, none of them
used the entire blade, and none of them were designed with ease of
control in mind. This new Bonny Doon product is as close to perfect
as I have ever seen for sawing in flat sheet.

For sawing earring, pendant, and bracelet profiles it has no peer. I
DO intend to use it to cut about 40 pancake dies that have been
laid out for about a year now…

(Not yet a satisfied customer - but I know I will be:)

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts
Stockton, CA 95209 USA
209-477-0550 Workshop/Studio/
instructor@jewelryartschool.com
jewelryartschool@aol.com

Margaret,

There’s a great discussion on the Bonny Doon Message board for the
new saw: http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com Under: ‘Demo-ing The New
Concept Saw at Rio’s Catalog in Motion in Tucson’

  The electronic Foredom-type foot control is great! I had been
  worried that it might be rather like patting my stomach and
  rubbing my head to operate the saw with a treadle or pedal. 
  Also, this makes it much more compact, which is good for my
  crowded little studio. I found it very intuitive to use, once
  I un-learned a few habits from 35 years using a jewelers' saw.
  I really like having the control with my foot, and being able
  to speed up and slow down easily, while having both hands free
  to control the metal---though it hardly is necessary to use
  both hands, since there is a wonderful hold-down foot.  It
  really only requires a couple of fingers to guide the
  metal---no more tired left hand holding the metal down. All
  the women who came through the Rio Catalog in Motion in Tucson
  felt very comfortable with the saw, typically exclaiming,
  "It's like a sewing machine!" 

  Indeed, I like the way I can start smoothly and slowly, and
  then speed up ---unlike the scroll saw that I have which has
  two speeds, controlled by a button in the back,  turns on with
  a scream, shake, rattle and roar, and requires nerves of steel
  to hold the metal down and keep it under control.  

  I am amazed at the quality of the cut it makes. It runs so
  true, that it feels like I've already filed it! We tried 24
  gauge sterling, 18 gauge bronze, 20 gauge copper, 1/16" tool
  steel, and 1/4" plexiglas.  1/0 saw blades seemed to work well
  for all of them!  We also did some sawing with 4/0 blades---no
  problems.  

  I usually use a spiral wax blade to saw 1/4" plexi for matrix
  dies, but the 1/0 jewelers saw blade cut through beautifully,
  without gumming up, or getting stuck.  It left a smooth,
  vertical cut that did not need filing!  wow! 

   I think I'm in love.
   Cindy
   www.cynthiaeid.com 

Sounds pretty fantastic, and a lot more advanced than the Cuti Pi
machine i.e. self lubricating blade (for extended life), foredoom
foot control, and what sounds like extremely smooth metal control.

Cheers,
Taylor in Toronto

I had the good fortune to play with the Bonny Doon concept saw at
the Rio show. It is in a league of its own. You can’t really compare
the Cuti-pi, or any other saw, to the Bonny Doon.

Tim

I had the good fortune to play with the Bonny Doon concept saw at
the Rio show. It is in a league of its own. You can't really
compare the Cuti-pi, or any other saw, to the Bonny Doon. 

What is the price going to be, did they say?

Since it was a conceptual product at the show, I don’t think a price
had been established for the Boony Doon saw. From my perspective
though, I would say that the Bonny Doon saw will out perform
anything else on the market by a wide margin. It will be well worth
the price tag whatever it ends up being.

Tim

From Lee @ Bonny Doon:

  Based upon the response that we had at Tucson, we are now in
  the "design for production" phase, making slight adjustments
  in dimensions to ease manufacture and assembly and I am
  ordering components for a run of 500 units. The sales price I
  am shooting for is $1495, although I do not have all of the
  outside machining costs in as yet.

Hope this helps give you a ‘ball park’.

Cheers,
Taylor in Toronto