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Custome Jewelry, Earwire


#1

Is it not the nickel (also) in sterling silver which produces allergic
reations in some people…and surgical steel is an alloy made mostly of
stainless steel. What is in stainless steel, however, I would like to
know.

Susan

I am still not sure what kind of costume jewelry Chrystal is looking for,
but there is a great book available at every larger bookstore (such as
Borders).
The title is Popular Jewelry 1840-1940 by Roseann Ettinger. ($25.00)

Even if it is not the type of jewelry you are looking for the book is worth
a glance.

My other comment would be to Charles (about Sandra’s question of the
earwires) I am not aware that they make earwires of fine silver (wouldn’t
it be too crumbly ?) and I had a lot of customers who are allergic to
sterling silver wires. The 5 % of alloy contains zinc, and a large amount
of people allergic to that.

I don’t know exactly what surgical steel contains either, but it does not
seem to be relevant. (I don’t think our customers are intersted in it
either as long as it is hypoallergenic). It would be logical, that if it
is surgical steel it contains no element that could cause allergic
reaction. Isn’t this why it is called surgical steel? This was my
understanding about this and I think a lot of my customers as well. Even
though I am not allergic to anything, sometimes (during the summer
especially) I had some minor infections. To overcome this I always dip the
earwire into a small tube of antibacterial, antibiotic ointment. The
earwire slides in easier (sometimes just poking around there try to get the
wire in can injure the hole and cause infection) and it seems to stop the
problem before it could happen.

Gabriella magyar@west.net

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *
    
  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#2

Is it not the nickel (also) in sterling silver which produces allergic
reations in some people…and surgical steel is an alloy made mostly of
stainless steel. What is in stainless steel, however, I would like to
know.

Susan

According to my 2,347 pages Unabridged Webster, stainless steel is alloyed
with chromium, virtually immune to rust and corrosion.

As opposed to other varieties of steel that might contain nickel or
manganese - this is the way I understand it.

Evidently chromium does not cause allergic reaction. (I thougth surgical
steel is stainless steel - for exactly the above criteria. No rust, no
corrosion, no allergy)

Gabriella @magyar

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#3

Is it not the nickel (also) in sterling silver which produces allergic
reations in some people…and surgical steel is an alloy made mostly of
stainless steel. What is in stainless steel, however, I would like to
know.

I don’t know a thing about stainless, but all of my silver has been alloyed
with copper. Not nickel. White gold is usually alloyed with nickel.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#4

Copper too is affected by oxidation, albeit slowly due to the skin which
forms but in time copper and bronzes will disintegrate (takes centuries,
however). This may be just enough to react with sensitive skins though.
How about work-hardening fine silver for earwires? You can purchase hardened
sterling silver wire through Swest. Perhaps they will do the same with
fine sterling wire upon request. Ask for George (Rodriguez, I believe).
Last number I had for him was 800-848-5863…he used to be affiliated with
Swest, now Hoover & Strong, maybe both…anyway, if anyone can find out
about such things, George will…good luck).

Susan Card


#5

Hi Gabriella: It would stand to reason that any metal (or alloy) which
corrodes will cause skin reaction since it’s the oxidation which produces
the problem.


#6

Reply-to: orchid@ganoksin.com

Stainless steel is an alloy of Chromuim, Nickel and Iron
different grades of stainless steel have different amounts of Nickel
and chromuim 316 Stainless steel has 12 percent Nickel, 18 Percent
Chromuim and the remainder is iron. In the higher grades of stainless
steels the percentage of chromuim and nickel is increased to provide
increased corrosion resistance.

Is it not the nickel (also) in sterling silver which produces allergic
reations in some people…and surgical steel is an alloy made mostly of
stainless steel. What is in stainless steel, however, I would like to
know.

Susan

According to my 2,347 pages Unabridged Webster, stainless steel is alloyed
with chromium, virtually immune to rust and corrosion.

As opposed to other varieties of steel that might contain nickel or
manganese - this is the way I understand it.

Evidently chromium does not cause allergic reaction. (I thougth surgical
steel is stainless steel - for exactly the above criteria. No rust, no
corrosion, no allergy)

Gabriella magyar@west.net

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#7

Reply-to: orchid@ganoksin.com

Is it not the nickel (also) in sterling silver which produces allergic
reations in some people…and surgical steel is an alloy made mostly of
stainless steel. What is in stainless steel, however, I would like to
know.

I don’t know a thing about stainless, but all of my silver has been alloyed
with copper. Not nickel. White gold is usually alloyed with nickel.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: manmountaindense@knight-hub.com
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *
    

I am told that after annealing silver often it is thrown into acid to
remove the firescale and fluxes whilst still hot. If this is done the
acid enters the pores of the metal and when the metal cools the acid
is trapped inside the metal. To prevent this only place cold items in
acid.

If one has an item that has been annealed hot or is causing an
allergic reaction one should re-heat the item and anneal it in a
dilute bi-carb or washing soda solution


#8

Paul Nicholson wrote:

I am told that after annealing silver often it is thrown into acid to
remove the firescale and fluxes whilst still hot. If this is done the
acid enters the pores of the metal and when the metal cools the acid
is trapped inside the metal. To prevent this only place cold items in
acid.

If one has an item that has been annealed hot or is causing an
allergic reaction one should re-heat the item and anneal it in a
dilute bi-carb or washing soda solution

I had no idea that metal had pores that could trap acid! I am interested
in your source for this

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830


#9

Paul Nicholson wrote:

I am told that after annealing silver often it is thrown into acid to
remove the firescale and fluxes whilst still hot. If this is done the
acid enters the pores of the metal and when the metal cools the acid
is trapped inside the metal. To prevent this only place cold items in
acid.

If one has an item that has been annealed hot or is causing an
allergic reaction one should re-heat the item and anneal it in a
dilute bi-carb or washing soda solution

I had no idea that metal had pores that could trap acid! I am interested
in your source for this

Yeah, I heard this story myself about ten years ago. I don’t know why
I should believe it, but hey, maybe it’s true with some castings, eh?

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.