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Cryogenics to extend life of metal


#1

I just saw an article in my local paper about a company in York
Pennsylvania U.S.A., near where I live, using cryogenics to extend
the life of metal objects and thought that this would be a way to
extend the life of saw blades etc.

Here is how it works, they use liquid nitrogen to super-cool objects
to minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit for between 12 and 20 hours. Then
they gradually warm the chamber to room temperature so as not to
deliver a thermal shock to the objects inside. For metallic objects,
like slicing blades, a heat cycle of 300 degrees Fahrenheit follows.
It alters the crystalline structure of the metal in a beneficial way
causing metal objects to wear longer. This works for bearings that
often wear out frequently. It works on shotgun barrels, saw blades,
engine parts, and anything made out of metal.

This sounds like a really great idea to extend the life of metal. I
think it would be worth looking into for tools etc. Here is how you
can reach this company: www.FountainheadCryo.com

Roxan in Pa.


#2

Hello Roxan,

Sorry but I have to laugh a bit. It not about your enthusiasm, this
you should keep. But this company is like the ones who claims less
fuel use in your car when you put a magnet around your fuel line to
the motor in your car. Ha ha Ha. If this worked it would already done
80 years ago. Beside being a goldsmith I’m also working a senior
designer for diesel technologie at Wartsila. We use the liquid nitrogen
to freeze in several engine parts. The parts have at room temperature
an oversize towards the hole they are need to be fitted. The cooling
to -200 degrees Celsius will shrink the part and fits in the hole.
After warming up it expands in the hole and a perfect binding is
achieved. Now this, if cooling down of steel and alloyed steel will
get stronger, harder etc. We would have known, it is than a sheep way
of making better steel. Unfortunately it is not so.

Martin Niemeijer


#3

It is not witchcraft and it does work. It does improve the use and
wear properties of some steels. I am not really familiar with which
metals it applies to. It is used for cutting tools - drills, knives,
sawblades etc. The only time I saw the application in use was at
Hughes oil well tools on rotary well drilling bits. Jesse I just saw
an article in my local paper about a company in York Pennsylvania
U.S.A., near where I live, using cryogenics to extend the life of
metal objects and thought that this would be a way to extend the life
of saw blades etc.

H
Roxan in Pa.


#4

I just saw an article in my local paper about a company in York
Pennsylvania U.S.A., near where I live, using cryogenics to extend the
life of metal objects and thought that this would be a way to extend
the life of saw blades etc.

Here is how it works, they use liquid nitrogen to super-cool objects
to minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit for between 12 and 20 hours. Then they
gradually warm the chamber to room temperature so as not to deliver a
thermal shock to the objects inside. For metallic objects, like
slicing blades, a heat cycle of 300 degrees Fahrenheit follows. It
alters the crystalline structure of the metal in a beneficial way
causing metal objects to wear longer. This works for bearings that
often wear out frequently. It works on shotgun barrels, saw blades,
engine parts, and anything made out of metal.

This sounds like a really great idea to extend the life of metal. I
think it would be worth looking into for tools etc. Here is how you
can reach this company: www.FountainheadCryo.com

Roxan in Pa.