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Crown Jewels


#1

Today we went to an overpriced cookware store, looking for something
featured in the New York Times. As often happens, my husband stuck
to the task and I got sidetracked. We had been greeted at the door
by a gentleman with an English accent, so while my husband searched
the shelves, I stayed to chat with the friendly Brit.

He was from London, which we had visited a couple of months ago. He
asked if I had gone to see the Crown Jewels. Well, of course we had
visited the Tower of London and waited in line–uh, “queue”–to see
them, so he told me a story about his great-uncle and the crown
jewels.

This uncle lived in Wales and was supervisor for all the Welsh coal
mines. In 1939, he was summoned to the Tower of London by the Lord
Lieutenant of the Tower. All very mysterious and hush-hush. On his
arrival, he met not only the Lord Lieutenant, but King George VI as
well! He was told to take the Crown Jewels and hide them in the
Welsh mines, in case the Germans invaded and took London.

So he hid the jewels in ordinary dynamite crates, deep within the
mines. The crates really did contain liberal quantities of
dynamite–but it wasn’t for the enemy, it was for the jewels. His
orders were to destroy the jewels rather than allow them to be
taken. Years later, Queen Elizabeth awarded him a medal for his
service.

I assume that this is a true story, although it doesn’t really
matter because I enjoyed hearing it. We didn’t find the thing we
were shopping for, but this was much better.

Janet


#2

Janet, Great story, and it may very well be true.

This is what I know about the other treasures.

Between Aug 23rd and Sept 2 1939, Britain’s art treasures and other
historical artifacts were removed from the National Galleries and
from Hampton Court and transported to Wales for safe keeping. They
were eventually housed 1,750 feet above sea level in the tunnels of
the slate quarry at Manod, near Ffestiniog in North Wales. Atmosphere
was kept at a steady 64 degrees F. with 40 degrees humidity. All were
returned safely to London in 1945.

I was born and bred about 12 mles from this site in a town called
Porthmadog, so I am very familiar with the mines and their history.

It is very well know, that the best kept secret of all during WW2,
was the destination of the Crown Jewels. To this day, the hiding
place has never been revealed by the British Government.

Janet, you may have met one of the very few individuals that
actually knows what really happened, and you spilled the beans :slight_smile:

On another note, Britain’s gold reserves, valued at 7 billion
dollars at the time, were taken to canada in the cruiser HMS Emerald
and stored in the faults of Montreal’s banks.

Best Regards.
Neil George
954-572-5829


#3

I believe it Jeanet.

Just before and even during the war alot of items from the
Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam were transported to secret locations,
amongst which some mines in the south.

Alain


#4

The post on the Crown Jewels of England brought to mind a story in
my family about an ancestor who stole the Crown Jewels. The story is
a part of the history of England as far as I know. Briefly, the
story is as follows: Thomas Blood (my brothers name) was born in
Ireland in the early 1600s. He was frequently involved in violent
political endeavors which kept him in trouble with the authorities.
One of his schemes was a plot to steal the Crown Jewels. He went to
see the Crown Jewels in the guise of a preacher and, under a false
name, he made friends with the Keeper of the Crown Jewels. The
Keeper and his family lived in a space above the vault containing
the Jewels. Thru Blood’s efforts, the friendship grew to the point
where Blood suggested a meeting between his wealthy “nephew” and the
Keeper’s very comely daughter. The Keeper and his wife were
delighted at the prospect of their daughter marrying into wealth and
readily agreed to the meeting. At the meeting, while Blood’s
"nephew" was getting acquainted with the Keeper’s daughter, Blood
asked the Keeper to show his “friends” the Crown Jewels. As soon as
the door to the vault was unlocked, Blood knocked the Keeper
unconscious. The Crown Jewels were stuffed in a bag. Items too big
were squashed under foot. The sceptre was too long to go in the
bag. While they were trying to cut it in half, the Keeper awoke and
raised the alarm by shouting and hollering. Blood and his crew ran
off carrying what they could, but were caught at the moat bridge as
they tried to leave the Tower.

Blood would not respond to question from anyone except the King
himself. King Charles was amused at Blood’s audacity and the manner
in which he spoke. He pardoned Blood and, to the dismay of the
court, gave Blood land in Ireland that was worth a considerable
amount.

Apparently that was the last time anyone tried to seal the Crown
Jewels of England.

Captain Blood
"Marlinespike Seamanship in Precious Metals"
@Alden_Glenda_Blood


#5

Alden and Glenda, Enjoyed reading your post. You may be interested in
this link, that mentions more on the exploits of your infamous
relative Colonel Thomas Blood.

http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/people/blood.htm

Best Regards.
Neil George
954-572-5829


#6

Hi Orchid Members:

May the Crown Jewels of England reign. I love British people, and
find them to be very interesting.

This is a little OT - but related to the jewelry business. I found an
Article about CoCo Chanel that I found to be very interesting if
anyone would like to read about CoCo Chanel.

http://www.oldandsold.com/articles/article128.shtml

CoCo Chanel always believed the No. 5 to be her lucky number.
Thus, the creation of Chanel No. 5 perfume. Chanel sold jewelry on
February 5th and August 5th of every single year. Sounds as if the
jewelry maker and clothing designer was somewhat superstitious.

I just bought a copy of the Chanel book titled “Chanel - A Woman of
Her Own” by Alex Madsen. Did anyone know that Chanel was also
involved with Igor Stravinsky and Winston Churchhill? I am
looking forward to reading this book, I bought it off E-Bay. Any
Chanel Lovers out there?

Enjoy the article ladies and gentleman.

Very Best,

Tina Ratner
@Tina_Ratner


#7

This is a very amusing story and I checked it, the outline seems
right, the details I now got form you. I need to correct you on the
"Apparently that was the last time anyone tried to seal the Crown
Jewels of England" part.

In 2003 another theft took place by Sauvage, fortunately Rowan
Atkinson brought them back.

Alain


#8
    an ancestor who stole the Crown Jewels... Blood would not
respond to question from anyone except the King himself.  King
Charles was amused...He pardoned Blood and... gave Blood land in
Ireland 

Alden and Glenda, does this mean you are landed gentry?! Titled?

I heard your story from a tour guide! Not at the Tower, but on one
of those double-decker tour buses. I really enjoyed the tour
guide’s stories and asked him a lot of questions. The fact that he
resembled Pierce Brosnan had absolutely nothing to do with it :wink:

The true City of London is a small area which the bus meandered in
and out of. Every entrance to the City was marked with a coat of
arms and London’s motto: “Domine dirige nos”. Pierce didn’t know
what the Latin meant (yes, I asked).

(I tried to noodle it out myself. “Domine” is obviously God and
"dirige" looked a bit like the word dirigible, but “God is our
hot-air balloon” didn’t sound a likely motto for an historic city.)

Janet


#9
 Every entrance to the City was marked with a coat of arms and
London's  motto: "Domine dirige nos". Pierce didn't know what the
Latin meant (yes,  I asked). 

Janet,

My latin is not exactly wonderful either, but I think it means
"Lord, guide us" or “God guides us”. Surely among our constituents
is one who is quite proficient in latin. Where are you when we need
you?

Kay


#10
  Every entrance to the City was marked with a coat of arms and
London's  motto: "Domine dirige nos". Pierce didn't know what the
Latin meant (yes,  I asked). 

O Lord, direct us.

Bill Bedford


#11

Alain - Thanks for the update on the latest attempt to steal the
Crown jewels.

Janet- Unfortunately, we are not landed gentry. Or maybe it is not
so unfortunate! I have read that some landed gentry have a problem
with taxes and upkeep costs and are charging for tours thru their
homes and estates. It is my understanding that the right to claim
titles and Coat of Arms pass to the first born son of each
generation. I do not even know if “Colonel” Blood had a son.

Captain Blood
"Marlinespike Seamanship in Precious Metals"
@Alden_Glenda_Blood


#12
      Every entrance to the City was marked with a coat of arms

and London’s motto: “Domine dirige nos”. Pierce didn’t know what
the Latin meant (yes, I asked).

    O Lord, direct us. 

And that’s why there’s Orchidians…
Thank You…
My Latin is way too rusty…

Illia id jacta est…

And other folks can argue what’s cast…or how it’s cast……

Gary W. Bourbonais
AJP (GIA)