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Creasing hammer


#1

Hi everyone - In several books (all published in the U.K.) I’ve seen
references to creasing hammers, which look like a pretty good tool
to have. In looking on the Web and in the catalogs I have, I haven’t
been able to find a U.S. source for one, only places in the U.K. Is
this type of hammer called by another name in the US, or are there
US sources where I could buy one? Thanks for any help you can give.
Cathy Heinz


#2
     Hi everyone - In several books (all published in the U.K.)
I've seen references to creasing hammers, which look like a pretty
good tool to have. In looking on the Web and in the catalogs I
have, I haven't been able to find a U.S. source for one, only
places in the U.K. Is this type of hammer called by another name in
the US, or are there US sources where I could buy one? Thanks for
any help you can give. Cathy Heinz 

What is this hammer to do? Contenti has a bordering hammer.
Silvermithing by Finegold and Seitz shows a crimping hammer that
resembles the bordering hammer. Are you raising metal or trying to
get an edge on a tray?

Marilyn Smith


#3
I haven't been able to find a U.S. source for one, 

Allcraft in New York. Phone or by mail. No web site.


#4

I think this might be what is called a bordering hammer (seems to
look like it). Centaur forge (http://www.centaurforge.com ) has 2
sizes of these made by Peddinghause 1 at 200 grams and the other at
500 grams… these are heavier than the 4 oz one sold by one of the
UK outlets.

Ordering from Europe isn’t such a big deal anymore but shipping can
be slow. There are some blacksmiths making very nice tools in the
US. one to consider is Jackpine. One of his hammers may be pretty
close to what you want ( jpine@ paulbunyan net ). Jesse


#5

This appears to be a cross peen hammer with the wedge section
parallel to the handle. The link below shows a creasing hammer.

http://www.deltahorseshoe.com/catalog.html then page down to James
Blurton Tools


#6

The books I have show creasing being done with a raising hammer,
that is the head extends quite a long distance from the handle at
each side, with each end having a sort of cross pein shape at right
angles to the shaft. The actual shape is more rounded than a cross
pein though.

The creasing is done (the books say) with the silver backed by a
sandbag or a grooved piece of wood. Looking at the illustrations it
does appear that a hammer with the long dimension at the end of the
head running parallel to the shaft might be easier to use. But, they
also mention that creasing is best attempted when good skills in
raising by the usual method have been attained. It is a way of
speeding up the early stages of raising.

See, for example: Silversmithing, Frances Loyen, Thames and Hudson,
ISBN 0 500 68021 3 Silversmith’s Manual, Bernard Cuzner, NAG Press,
ISBN 7198 0062 5

Kevin (NW England, UK)


#7

A wooden or leather mallet can be used for this purpose. It marks
the metal less during this crimping. The head of the wooden one can
be reshaped with files or belt sander if the usual shape is awkward.

Marilyn Smith