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Costume Jewelery


#1

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US. I know nothing
technical about the business and would love someone to chat with in regard
to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used. Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Thanks!

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#2

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard

to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain©1994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain©1996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#3

Charles,

Thanks. I appreciate the however, I am not talking about
collecting antique jewelry. I am talking about having my own made, thus the
need to understand the process of manufacturing and materials used. Are you
saying that these books will help me with manufacturing today? Haven’t had
the opportunity to look at the Thomas site you mentioned, but if you think
of anything else that might help me, that would be great.

Cheers.

Crystal

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard

to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain©1994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain©1996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#4

Crystal,

Those books have some basic info on technical. Manufacturing options range
from spin casting (most common) to stamping and so on. People who make
souvenir spoon ends and Dungeons and Dragons people also spin cast. You
might check your phone book for costume jewelry manufacturers and go visit
them. Most people who do the spin casting route as designers draw the
design, make a full scale model in wax and have it cast as an original and
then have a service company do the actual casting, plating etc. You might
try Murray Bovin’s book on casting-I think there is spin casting info in
there.

Also try posting on rec.crafts.jewelry and rec.crafts.metalworking news groups

good luck

Charles

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard

to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain©1994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain©1996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#5

Crystal,

It depends on whether or not you are talking about making stuff for your
personal use, or designing as producable/saleable good too, in therm of what
direction you should look. Two different ends of the business.

Charles,

Thanks. I appreciate the however, I am not talking about
collecting antique jewelry. I am talking about having my own made, thus the
need to understand the process of manufacturing and materials used. Are you
saying that these books will help me with manufacturing today? Haven’t had
the opportunity to look at the Thomas site you mentioned, but if you think
of anything else that might help me, that would be great.

Cheers.

Crystal

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard

to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus=
or

from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use=
words

only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain=A91994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain=A91996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#6

Rick,

I’m wanting to (someday) have my own jewelry line and, therefore, would want
to produce saleable items. Initially, I would need to organize prototypes.

Crystal

At 05:37 PM 7/10/96 -0400, you wrote:

Crystal,

It depends on whether or not you are talking about making stuff for your
personal use, or designing as producable/saleable good too, in therm of what
direction you should look. Two different ends of the business.

Charles,

Thanks. I appreciate the however, I am not talking about
collecting antique jewelry. I am talking about having my own made, thus the
need to understand the process of manufacturing and materials used. Are you
saying that these books will help me with manufacturing today? Haven’t had
the opportunity to look at the Thomas site you mentioned, but if you think
of anything else that might help me, that would be great.

Cheers.

Crystal

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard

to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus=
or

from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use=
words

only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain=A91994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain=A91996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#7

Dear Crystal

You said:-

I’m wanting to (someday) have my own jewelry line and, therefore, would want
to produce saleable items. Initially, I would need to organize prototypes.

I am a professional jewellery designer with costume jewellery manufacturing
connections in India.

Assuming you are going the commercial route, I would be very interested in
working with you and having just completed a large diamond project aimed at
Europe for a large Indian group I can confirm that Net was a very
useful & positive tool in our working relationship.

The factory and I exchanged detailed sketches and full
colour art work image files using E-Mail. We were able to
do this from the initial sketches right and through the
design program up to and including finished paint-ups of
the completed work. (So much better than a fax)

I also have on my team some very skilful master makers and
wax carvers, so I can take any approved designs up to
master stage if required.

I look forward to hearing from you.
Best Regards

Sally Tyler
The Jewellery Design Network

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#8

Do you have any good connections for colored stone cutting. I am
constantlt on the look out for good , capable, cheap cutters. Please
let me know asap. Rob
Ringold’s Inc. est 1908. 9865 Bustleton Avenue Phila, Pa 19115
Ph(215)671-8190 / Fax(215)969-1803 / 800-234-GEMS
url: Http://www.ringolds.com / Email: Ringold@IX.netcom.com
Gem & Mineral mining / Product Development / Manufacturing
Attn: Mr. Robert D. Ringold

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#9

Sally Tyler - Jewelry Design Network,

Thanks for your e-mail. I would be interested in e-mailing you direct with
specifics about what I’m interested in doing. If you can e-mail me on
"@Peter_Jansson", we can talk further.
:slight_smile:

Crystal Sloan

At 06:24 AM 7/11/96 +0100, you wrote:

Dear Crystal

You said:-

I’m wanting to (someday) have my own jewelry line and, therefore, would want
to produce saleable items. Initially, I would need to organize prototypes.

I am a professional jewellery designer with costume jewellery manufacturing
connections in India.

Assuming you are going the commercial route, I would be very interested in
working with you and having just completed a large diamond project aimed at
Europe for a large Indian group I can confirm that Net was a very
useful & positive tool in our working relationship.

The factory and I exchanged detailed sketches and full
colour art work image files using E-Mail. We were able to
do this from the initial sketches right and through the
design program up to and including finished paint-ups of
the completed work. (So much better than a fax)

I also have on my team some very skilful master makers and
wax carvers, so I can take any approved designs up to
master stage if required.

I look forward to hearing from you.
Best Regards

Sally Tyler
The Jewellery Design Network

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#10

Crystal,

The first thing I would suggest you do is track down a book by Maurice
Galli, called The Art of Jewelry Design, published by Schiffer (1994). I
got mine at Borders Bookstore for $53.95. Pricey, but VERY worthwhile.
There are many fine model makers and casters who could help you through the
prototype/production process. What part of the world do you live in?

Rick

Rick,

I’m wanting to (someday) have my own jewelry line and, therefore, would want
to produce saleable items. Initially, I would need to organize prototypes.

Crystal

At 05:37 PM 7/10/96 -0400, you wrote:

Crystal,

It depends on whether or not you are talking about making stuff for your
personal use, or designing as producable/saleable good too, in therm of what
direction you should look. Two different ends of the business.

Charles,

Thanks. I appreciate the however, I am not talking about
collecting antique jewelry. I am talking about having my own made, thus the
need to understand the process of manufacturing and materials used. Are you
saying that these books will help me with manufacturing today? Haven’t had
the opportunity to look at the Thomas site you mentioned, but if you think
of anything else that might help me, that would be great.

Cheers.

Crystal

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.

Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard
to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.

Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus=

or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use=

words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain=A91994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain=A91996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#11

Rick,

I’m in LA. The type of jewelry that I’d be interested in producing is stuff
that I would be interested in wearing but can’t find much of in stores
(ranging from Neiman Marcus to Beverly Hills stores to other individual
shops). Thus, I felt there may be a market for it (since no one else seems
to have thought of it). I will look for that book. I am certainly not a
designer and just have ideas about what I would want. That’s why I thought
some generic book or source of would be good - because I don’t
even know what materials things are made out of!

Your help is really appreciated.

Crystal

At 06:13 PM 7/11/96 -0400, you wrote:

Crystal,

The first thing I would suggest you do is track down a book by Maurice
Galli, called The Art of Jewelry Design, published by Schiffer (1994). I
got mine at Borders Bookstore for $53.95. Pricey, but VERY worthwhile.
There are many fine model makers and casters who could help you through the
prototype/production process. What part of the world do you live in?

Rick

Rick,

I’m wanting to (someday) have my own jewelry line and, therefore, would want
to produce saleable items. Initially, I would need to organize prototypes.

Crystal

At 05:37 PM 7/10/96 -0400, you wrote:

Crystal,

It depends on whether or not you are talking about making stuff for your
personal use, or designing as producable/saleable good too, in therm of what
direction you should look. Two different ends of the business.

Charles,

Thanks. I appreciate the however, I am not talking about
collecting antique jewelry. I am talking about having my own made, thus the
need to understand the process of manufacturing and materials used. Are you
saying that these books will help me with manufacturing today? Haven’t had
the opportunity to look at the Thomas site you mentioned, but if you think
of anything else that might help me, that would be great.

Cheers.

Crystal

At 03:32 PM 7/9/96 -0600, you wrote:

Hi! My name is Crystal and I am interested in costume jewelry. It was
suggested that someone in the orchid group might be able to help me with
some initial on manufacturing in the US.
Try Thomas Register home page:

http://www.thomasregister.com:8000/home.html
Thomas Register, a great service and company finding site.

Also try the Providence, Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce.
I know nothing technical about the business and would love someone to chat
with in regard
to where I could go to speak to someone about how costume jewelry is made
and what type of materials are used.
Mostly it is ‘spin-cast’ in large circular rubber molds which spin while
the ‘white metal’ (zinc plus other stuff) is poured into it. There are
service companies around which can carry out jobs for one.
Costume jewelry to me is not copies
of fine jewelry and not cheap stuff. Hi-end stuff seen at Neiman Marcus=

or
from designers like Swarovski or harking back to eras like the '50s.

Any help would be appreciated. (Remember - novice - please don’t use=

words
only a jewelry manufacturer could understand!)

Good Luck

Charles

Here are a couple of reviews of starter books:

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” An identification and
Value Guide By Maryanne Dolan
Lewton-Brain=A91994

This book by Maryanne Dolan is in its third edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
rhinestone jewelry.
The Rhinestone Jewelry market has grown over the past few years as
anyone who goes into antique shops knows. What you might not be aware of is
that many of those ‘junk jewelry’ pieces command prices between two and
three hundred dollars and some of them are worth thousands. This book
explains the field for a neophyte and looks to be an indispensable resource
for those already involved with it. It was interesting to get a sense of
the scene and the seriousness with which pieces are avidly collected,
traded and valued.
Chapters address definitions, history, manufacturers, designers, the
making methods, care and keeping, trademarks, photos, descriptions, values
and finally seventeen chapters on jewelry by object type (‘Bracelets’ for
example). These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current
value ranges for the piece. There are between four and seven pieces per
page in this section. At three hundred and eighteen pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field. The trademarks
section alone is about a hundred and fifty pages with about fourteen
trademark pictures per page, comments and a paragraph about the company
concerned and the marks first date of use.
While the section on designers is short it sums up much of the
pertinent about famous names to watch for and comments on the
current valuation for a particular name’s worth. An example is ‘Mosell as a
signature on jewelry is really climbing to the top of the charts’.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 24 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty. The book is however concerned primarily with
documentation and so for those using the photo only to identify a given
piece for a valuation the photographs will serve. The cover is attractive.
The material qualities are not extremely high but besides being a
historical document about rhinestone jewelry it is also a current market
guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side of it. The
research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book that is a
tool for people who trade in rhinestone jewelry. A well done and
professional reference book.

“Collecting Rhinestone and Colored Stone Jewelry” By Maryanne Dolan
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-099-6

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.

Review by Charles Lewton-Brain=A91996

This book by Jeanenne Bell is in its fourth edition and is clearly a
required text for those interested in buying, selling and evaluating
antique and old jewelry, particularly at the regular levels of
commerce-that is that there are lots of examples cited with prices between
50.00 and 400.00 dollars rather than the much higher prices that museums
and major collectors deal with. Most of the items shown are production
pieces.
The antique jewelry collectors market has grown over the past few years
as anyone who goes into antique shops or notices auction advertisements
knows. This book explains the field for a neophyte and seems to be an
indispensable resource for those already involved with it. At $22.95 I’d
call this a good deal for what you get.
The chapters address history in various period chunks (1840-60,
1861-89, 1890-1917, 1920’s-30’s, 1940-50), further sections include ‘What
is this Metal’, ‘Is it Real’? (some gemologists might cringe a bit-of
course its ‘real’, whether natural, synthetic, simulant etc. is another
matter-but I know what she meant), Makers Marks and a section on cameos.
There is a glossary and a nice selected bibliography at the end which while
a little general interest oriented (a number of magazine citations for
instance) is pretty good.

The historical sections are good, brief, fashion oriented and fairly
accurate though prone to generalizations-well cited however with suitable
quotations to illustrate points made.

The bulk of the book is taken up with photographs of pieces with brief
descriptions.

These descriptions include a photo, comments, dating and current value
ranges for the piece. At four hundred and two pages the book packs an
enormous amount of reference on the field.
A soft cover book in an 8" and a half by 11" format, it has hundreds of
black and white photos and 16 color photographs. The color photos are
fairly good but the black and white ones vary considerably in quality and
tend to be quite contrasty (they go from quite good to pretty abysmal). The
book is however concerned primarily with documentation and so for those
using the photo only to identify a given piece for a valuation the
photographs will serve. The material qualities are not extremely high but
besides being a historical document about antique jewelry it is also a
current market guide and so has a ‘life span’, at least on the pricing side
of it. The research part of it will remain of value. It is clearly a book
that is a tool for people who trade in old jewelry. A well done and
professional commercially oriented reference book.

If you are dealing in old jewelry I would say this book would be an
essential addition to your library.

“Answers to Questions about Old Jewelry” An identification and Value Guide
By Jeanenne Bell, G.G.
Books Americana Inc
PO Box 2326
Florence, Alabama
35630, USA

ISBN 0-89689-115-1

$22.95
(521 words)

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

Refractal Design, Inc. | voice: 508-777-5500 / fax: 508-777-6575
57 North Putnam St. | Internet: rbecker@refractal.com
Danvers, MA 01923 | Home page: http://www.refractal.com/
USA | Compuserve: 71664,600

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com
    

procedures *

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#12

300/9-10 Charoenkrung Road Soi #43
Bangrak 10500 Bangkok Thailand
Tel: (662) 266-9689 Fax: (662) 266-3565

X-01 Processing charges for precious stones :
(Ruby, Sapphire, Emerald…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.75 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid sizes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.85 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $4.00 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

X-02 Processing charges for high-end semi-precious stones :
(Tanzanite, Tsavorite, Tourmaline, Synthetics…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.75 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid sizes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.80 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $3.50 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

X-03 Processing charges for semi-precious stones :
(Amethyst, Citrine, Garnet, Topaz, Peridot…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.65 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid shapes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.75 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $3.00 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

Note: for facetting calibrated preforms only we deduct $0.10 US per
piece from above prices.
all prices are NET (do not included taxes, treatments, shipping,
or any other expenses).
*** FOR LARGE AND CONSISTENT ORDERS PRICES ARE NEGOTIABLE!!!
* we do not handle lots under 200 gms.


#13

Thanks for your offer,.
We’ll see what we can do and we’ll get back to you asap.
Regards
Don
Begin Included MessageDate: Sat, 3 Aug 1996 12:58:10 +0700 (GMT+0700)
From: “Yuval Menachem (Hemi)” englishe@mozart.inet.co.th
Reply-To: 199607111335.GAA12116@dfw-ix2.ix.netcom.com
Subject: Re: Costume Jewelery
To: orchid@ganoksin.com

From: GEMCAL CO.,LTD.
300/9-10 Charoenkrung Road Soi #43
Bangrak 10500 Bangkok Thailand
Tel: (662) 266-9689 Fax: (662) 266-3565

X-01 Processing charges for precious stones :
(Ruby, Sapphire, Emerald…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.75 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid sizes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.85 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $4.00 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

X-02 Processing charges for high-end semi-precious stones :
(Tanzanite, Tsavorite, Tourmaline, Synthetics…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.75 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid sizes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.80 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $3.50 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

X-03 Processing charges for semi-precious stones :
(Amethyst, Citrine, Garnet, Topaz, Peridot…)

Melees (of all sha- | 2mm up to 3mm | $0.65 US per piece
pes) | 1.5x3 up to 2x4 |

Mid shapes (of all | 3.25mm up to 5mm | $0.75 US per piece
shapes) | 2.5x5 up to 4x6 |

Big & free sizes (of | 5x7 and up | $3.00 US per carat
all shapes) | 5.25mm and up |

Note: for facetting calibrated preforms only we deduct $0.10 US per
piece from above prices.
all prices are NET (do not included taxes, treatments, shipping,
or any other expenses).
*** FOR LARGE AND CONSISTENT ORDERS PRICES ARE NEGOTIABLE!!!
* we do not handle lots under 200 gms.

procedures

End Included Message

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.OOOo/oOOO._________

         CHEERS!
        Don Rocha 

PO Box 9581, Brasilia, DF 70001-970 - Brazil
Tel/Fax +55-61-386-5558

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