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Copyrights


#1

I am designing a line of jewelry and would like to know your ideas about
copyrights for jewelry. I’m a new member and would appreciate your input.

THANK YOU"
Marvin Hildebrant


#2

I am designing a line of jewelry and would like to know your ideas about
copyrights for jewelry. I’m a new member and would appreciate your
input.

This topic seems to come up a lot; and with good reason. So, I thought I’d
mention a couple links that may help answer some of your questions.

This first one is in plain english and somewhat easy to follow.

http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html
10 myths about copyrights

This second link involves some reasearch and a sense for adventure. Enjoy.

http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright
U.S. Copyright Office Home Page

Love is enjoying what you do. I enjoy being a jeweler; so I never sweat
the small stuff.

Erik Tyme Hand-Fabrication Art Jeweler Seattle, Wa.
http://www.eriktyme.com


#3

Dear Marvin,
recent Orchid archives should have quite a bit of useful
info for you. It is a vexing topic and a function of our society which is
designed specifically for making lawyers very wealthy. regards, Rex from
Oz


#4

Hi Marvin,

From what little I understand of that subject the first thing you would
want to do is to get a registered halmark. This will stamped in each piece
of jewelry you produce. That shows people in the marketplace who made it.
I beleive that there are certain guidelines that you would have to follow
also, such as tollerences to the karat which is stamped in the product.
If you were to contact the US Patent office in DC they probably would be
able to help you with the right literature.

Good luck Michael B


#5

The quickie on copyrights, under US law:

I am not a lawyer, but my understanding is:

  1. Copyrights. Put the message “© 1998 yourname, all rights reserved” on
    photos, brochures, websites, etc. You then have 7 years to file a
    copyright with the USPTMO.

  2. trademarks. If you have a name of something, used as an adjective, then
    you can put the words ™ by the name, i.e, thebest™ idea, etc. this
    reserves the words as a service mark. If you use this for a long enough
    time, and you apply for a registered trademark (you need a patent attorney
    to do this), and you spend the bucks (about $2,500, by the tiem you get
    doen with all the nonsense you need to do) you can then get a registered
    trademark.

Registered trademarks can be valuable. I recently sold a trademark to
3com, that makes a certain handhled computer device.

But, unless the product is going to be in extremely high volume production
(in this last case, well over 2 million units) and large dollar amounts
(over 1,000,000 million US$ / year) it probably is not worth the expense.

Worry less, sell more

MarkZ