Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Copper with Arsenic


#1

Does anyone there know where I could get some copper with arsenic in
it. i need it for a lamination project.

Thank you,
Mike Haley


#2

Say what? Sounds dangerous to me. Aresenic is a heavy metal with some
very nasty habits - what is the arsenic supposed to add to your
lamination project? How much arsenic in how much copper? Check this
one out more carefully before you contaminate your work area with
serious poisons.


#3

My recommendation. Don’t bother messing with anything with arsenic in
it unless you have a fume hood or equivalent chemical lab level
protection. Charles

Charles Lewton-Brain
Box 1624, Ste M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7, Canada


#4

Does anyone there know where I could get some copper with arsenic in
it. i need it for a lamination project.

Do you mean Kuromido… a Japanese alloy that contains arsenic? The
sheet looks just like copper. I vaguely recall using some for a mokume
kane project many years ago.

Felicity in west Oz… where winter has hit us again.


#5

Copper-arsenic alloys are perfectly safe to use and handle under
normal conditions. When grinding or melting, take precautions against
breathing dust or fumes. Same for the copper.

The notorious arsenic poisons are actually compounds, not the
element. http://msds.pdc.cornell.edu/msds/msdsdod/a122/m60896.htm

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#6

Lets all don’t throw too much scat until we know a little more about
the subject. According to my online reading arsenic bronze is more
dangerous to the foundryman who makes it than the person who hammers
it and it may have superior ductility caracteristics to tin bronze. I
haven’t found a source of it, not even in the Thomas Register
http://www.thomasregister.com/ but that doesn’t mean there is no one
left in the world who can make it or sell it. Considering the fact
that copper, zinc, cadmium and nickle can all be toxic in both the
vapor and salt form we need to take precautions in all our metal work.
(Speaking as one whose cancer may have come in part from inhaling
common welding fumes I speak with at least minimal authority on
this.) Here is a list of interesting references which at least mention
it: http://tunica.bu.edu/Abstracts/L/LechtmanH_23_4.html
http://www.grayson.edu/grayson/homepage/clarks/bronze.htm
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/rialto/metals-msg.text
http://www.goodfellow.com/static/E/AS00.html